Trajan & Imperial Forums, Rome

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    Detail
    by roamer61
  • Trajan's Column from Il Vittoriano
    Trajan's Column from Il Vittoriano
    by fdrich29
  • Trajan & Imperial Forums
    by Turska
  • viddra's Profile Photo

    The Forum of Augustus

    by viddra Updated Aug 10, 2010
    the Temple of Mars

    This used to be a court of law, but only the stairs that once led to the temple and 2 basilicas have remained.

    Augustus had the forum built to avenge the death of Caesar. Thus the name of the temple - the Temple of Mars Ultor (Avenger).

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    The largest of the Imperial forums

    by viddra Updated Aug 10, 2010
    Trajan's column

    This used to be a religious and political centre of Ancient Rome. It included the Temple of Trajan, 2 libraries, the basilica Ulpia (you can still see its marble columns), the markets with stores and the column with the statue of Trajan (almost intact).

    If you take a closer look at the 40m-high column, you'll see the scenes from Trajan's campaign against the Dacians (e.g. the building of the bridge over the Danube, crossing rivers or conquests).

    Trajan's Forum was planned by Apollodorus of Damascus and built around 110.

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    Trajan's Market

    by June.b Written Jun 23, 2010
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    Crossing the street coming from the Roman Forum or opposite end is the market of Trajan. Might be the world's largest shopping mall. Although I always thought it's the Grand Bazaar in Istanbul. Built between 100-110AD by Apollodorus of Damascus.

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    Imperial Fora and Trajans Column

    by roamer61 Written May 4, 2009

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    These forums were part of the center of Ancient Rome and date from 46 BC to about 113 AD.
    Little remains of most of these. The last of these was Trajans Forum, which was inaugurated in 112. The column a year later. Trajans Coumn is the most outstanding remnant. It stands 98 feet high, 125 if you add the pedestal. It is wrapped with freizes commemorating Trajans campaigns against the Dacians.

    In 1587, Pope Sixtus V placed a statue of St. Peter on top.

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    Trajan's Column & Imperial Forums

    by fdrich29 Written Feb 12, 2009

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    We passed through this area on our way from our hotel to Il Vittoriano and didn't realize what it was until after returning home. This area has the feel of an archaeological dig, like people are still uncovering it's secrets. Trajan's Column commemorates his victory in Dacia and completed in 113 AD. The column is 138 feet high, the same height as the hill that stood at it's site prior to it's demolition to make way for the Forums.

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  • monica71's Profile Photo

    Fiori Imperiali, Trajan's Market & Trajan's Column

    by monica71 Updated Jan 28, 2009

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    Trajan's Market is the last imperial forum built during the ancient Rome times. It was inaugurated around 112-113 AD.

    Trajan's Column was constructed by Apollodorus of Damascus at the order of the Roman Senate to celebrate Trajan's victory over Dacia(now Romania). It was completed in 113 AD. The column had a statue of an eagle on top originally. After Trajan's death, it was replaced with a statue of Trajan himself. His ashes (and those of his wife, Plotina) were placed in the based of the column. In 1587 the statue of Trajan's was replaced by the statue of St Peter (still in place today).

    The Trajan column including its base is 42m high (138ft). This was exactly the height of the hill that stood at this site and that had been leveled to create the open space for the construction of Trajan's Forum.

    We did not visit the ruins, but we stopped by to take some pictures and admire the site from the street level.

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  • WheninRome's Profile Photo

    Trajan's Column

    by WheninRome Written Jan 17, 2009

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    Trajan's Column

    Next to the Victor Emmanuel Monument is Trajan's Column. Being a fan of Rome's various columns and arches, I enjoyed Trajan's Column greatly, if even simply viewing it from afar. The column rises 140 feet tall and has a continuous relief around its facade depicting Trajan's (Roman General) victories and conquests. At the top of the column used to be a bronze statue of Trajan, which is now replaced by a statue of St. Peter.

    You can pay admission to get into Trajan's Market (ruins of a commercial area in Roman times), but we did not do this. It did not seem worth the admission fee to us.

    I was simply content to gaze upon the Column for a short while. It is beautiful as seen from the rooftop of the Victor Emmanuel Monument.

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    Mercati di Traiano

    by Turska Written Oct 13, 2008

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    We allmost missed this,because at my guidebook it was told to be closed to public.We just walked by oe day,and noticed that it´s open.It has been since autumn 2007.
    We liked it a lot-like we allways do in "good"ruins.There is quite a lot saved,and it´s amazing to think that place has been like modern shopping-centres,with lots of littel shops.And how long ago this was!Over 2000 years still.
    Ticket was only 6.50e,and we thought it was worth it.Of course not everyone is such history-lover as we are(we didn´t love history at school-it came when we could go and see these things).

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    Trajan column - restoration works.

    by breughel Written Jun 17, 2008

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    Trajan column - with the works.

    If you want to learn something about the Roman army at the time of the empire you can't avoid turning 23 times around the Trajan column. I suggest taking binoculars because the restoration works keeps tourists at some distance.

    It is what I would call a difficult monument to look at. There are more than 2000 finelly carved figures about 2/3 life size. The scenes cover the entire range of military activity and also details of the land of Dacia. Historians and present tourists wonder how the spectators of the time of Trajan were able to view the spirals, especially the upper ones?

    The present restoration works aim at restoring the original polychromy of the column by a reversible technology. Light beams will color the column for some minutes each hour at night in 2009.

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    Imperial Forum

    by Skibbe Written Jun 16, 2008

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    This was built after the Roman Forum and was completed around 113 A.D. Most of it can be seen from the street so its a better deal for people on a budget than the Roman Forum, which is across the street from it.

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    TRAJAN'S COLUMN

    by DAO Updated Apr 26, 2008

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    CLICK ON THE PHOTO FOR THE POSTCARD VIEW !!!!
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    This has to be the most unappreciated and overlooked monument in (Ancient) Rome. Just to the East of the Plazza Venezia, it lies in the shadow of the impossibly large Victor Emmanuel Monument (1911) and is near the imposing Coliseum. Unlike so much of Ancient Rome, this column is virtually intact from its creation in 113 AD. It is both Victory Monument and Tomb. The 40 meter monument has 2500 figures in 155 scenes on 18 marble blocks and tells the story of Trajan’s victory over the Dacians in 2 wars fought in what is now Romania. The original statue of Trajan atop the monument was replaced by one of Saint Peter in 1587. It is hollow and has 183 stairs to the top. Because of its advanced age, the stairs are not open to the public.

    Emperor Trajan (98-117 AD) expanded the Roman Empire defeating Dacia (Modern Romania), Arabia, Mesopotamia and taking Babylon. He also directed the building the Markets of Trajan on the slopes of the Quirinal Hill. Unfortunately he had no place to be buried as the resting place of Emperors, the Mausoleum of Augustus, was full. So the Column of Trajan was built and Trajan and his wife were buried in the base.

    Please click on the photo to get the full Postcard view!

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    Torre delle Milizie

    by breughel Updated Apr 19, 2008

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    Torre delle Milizie

    FORUM REPLY.

    Visitors of the Museum and Mercati di Traiano have access to the feet of the tower and the small garden around but the tower himself is closed.
    I really recommend the whole site of the Mercati di Traiano for the views from the balconies. (re. my recent tip on the history of the tower)

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    The Rome's leaning tower

    by marco2005 Written Apr 18, 2008

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    the Tower outlining the Trajan Market
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    This tower characterises the outline of the Trajan Market in the Imperial Fora.
    The Torre delle Milizie (Militiae Tower) is one of the oldest and strongest fortified towers in Italy and the largest in Rome.
    It is popularly believed that Augustus is buried under the tower and the Nero watched the burning of Rome from the top (here comes the popular nickname of "Nero's Tower").
    Actually the tower was built by Pope Gregory IX in the 13th century and probably takes its name from a nearby barracks of Byzantine militia.

    The tower is on a square plan, its base sides measure 10.5 x 9.5 m, and it currently stands at almost 50 meters.
    Soon after its erection an earthquake in 1348 caused both the crumbling of an upper floor and the tower began sinking on one side, so that Rome, like Pisa, has its leaning tower (see photo).
    From the top of the tower there are magnificent views of central Rome and the ancient remains. But currently it is closed (undergoing renovations).

    info and booking for Mercati di Traiano (Trajan Market):
    +39.06.0608 9.00am-10.30pm
    (multilingual)

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  • wilocrek's Profile Photo

    Trajan's Column

    by wilocrek Written Mar 29, 2008

    Trajan's Column is a monument in Rome raised in honour of the Roman emperor Trajan and constructed by the architect Apollodorus of Damascus at the order of the Roman Senate. It is located in Trajan's Forum. This is one column worth checking out as the etchings are about as diverse and detailed as any column you will find in Rome, or even the world for that matter.

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    the Dacian wars

    by domenicococozza Written Aug 4, 2007

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    Trajan's column
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    Trajan's column depicts the wars against Dacia(modern day Rumania)in graphic detail.
    This column sits at the corner of Via Dei Fori Imperiali and Foro Traiano. Well worth a look as you leave the forum. It is set back from the main drag but you cant miss it.

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