Trajan & Imperial Forums, Rome

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    Detail
    by roamer61
  • Trajan's Column from Il Vittoriano
    Trajan's Column from Il Vittoriano
    by fdrich29
  • Trajan & Imperial Forums
    by Turska
  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Fori Imperiali

    by MM212 Updated Jun 12, 2007

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    Fori Imperiali
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    During the zenith days of Ancient Rome around the time of Julius Caeser, the Roman Forum, which was the centre of daily life in the Empire's capital, became too small. Successive Emperors, beginning with Julius Caeser, built new Fora near the Roman Forum and named them after themselves (Caeser, Augustus, Nerva, etc.). Although smaller than the Roman Forum, these Fora were equally magnificent, but did not survive the test of time and also remained buried under ground for centuries. Parts of these Fora have been excavated in recent years, but unfortunately, a large portion remains buried under their namesake avenue, the monumental Via dei Fori Imperiali, which was created by Mussolini and runs from Piazza Venezia to the Colosseum. The attached photo is a poster board on Via dei Fori Imperiali that explains the continuing excavation work.

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    Foro di Nerva

    by MM212 Written Jun 11, 2007

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    Foro di Nerva

    Built in 97 AD, the Forum of Nerva contained the Temple of Minerva and was adjacent to the Forum of Augustus. Much of the Forum of Nerva is now buried under Via dei Fori Imperiali. However, a small section of the Temple of Minerva, showing Corinthian columns and a beautiful frieze with sculptures of Roman women, is visible (see photo).

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    Foro di Traiano

    by MM212 Written Jun 7, 2007

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    Trajan's Forum
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    Trajan's Forum was built in the 2nd century AD and is located next to Trajan's Column and Markets. The largest basilica in ancient Rome, Basilica Ulpia, was located in this Forum. Only a small section of Trajan's Forum has been exposed and excavated. The rest, unfortunately, is buried under Rome's streets.

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    Mercati di Traiano (Trajan's Markets)

    by MM212 Updated Jun 5, 2007

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    Via Biberatica within Trajan's Markets
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    Built in the 2nd century AD by Emperor Trajan, his namesake markets could be considered ancient Rome's souk or bazaar. Not surprising perhaps, since the architect Apollodorus, who designed the markets, was from Damascus, a city known for its souks to this day. Although fairly well preserved, Trajan's Markets are said to show little of their original splendour. Every day produce and products were sold in these markets in Roman times. Tourist visits to the Markets are permitted.

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    Trajan`s Column

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated May 18, 2007

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    This 40m - high column was erected by Emperor Trajan after he conquered the Dacians (in modern-day Romania). The column shows the history of the conquest, as well as the clothing and equipment of Roman and Dacian soldiers, and gives a wealth of information if you study it closely. Unfortunately, the sculpture suffers heavily from the traffic fumes.

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    Colonna di Traiano (Trajan's Column)

    by MM212 Written May 16, 2007

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    Details of Trajan's Column
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    Erected in the early 2nd century AD, Trajan's Column celebrates his victories in Dacia, a region in today's Romania. The impressive 40 metre column tells the story of the Roman campaign to Dacia in the most detailed and beautiful carvings circling the column. The statue of Saint Peter's on top of the column replaced Trajan's statue in the 16th century. The column is located by Trajan's Market, just off Via dei Fori Imperiali and opposite Monumento a Vittorio Emanuele.

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    The Trajan's Markets

    by croisbeauty Updated Jan 28, 2007

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    Trajan's Market
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    The Emperor M. Ulpius Trajan expanded the Empire towards the east, making it the biggest in whole of its history. After he conquested Dacia, in 105 A.D., Trajan returned to Rome laden with treasure and made decision to commemorate the victory by building a Forum that would surpass all other in the city in splendor and scale. This project was entrusted to the great architect Apollodorus of Damascus, who build the forum which became the most admired place in the city.
    Trajan's Market consists of well preserved semi-circular three story structure and large vaulted hall which resembles a basilica. It is amazing in its proportions and one of the best preserved structure from the Roman times of the city.

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    Imperial Forums

    by effeti Updated Dec 10, 2006

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    The forum as seen from Capitol Hill
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    If you like history or archeology, in the very center of the town you have to visit the imperial forums... yes, the name arrived in the internet with the meaning of "the places where people meet each other"... like ancient romans did in those square an buildings. Here you can visit the ancient "Senatus" (another name survided more than 2500 years, right?) building, the Curia (see the floor on pict #2).
    And, winking to all of US VT friends, the picture #1 is from the Capitol Hill... Oh, yes, the ORIGINAL one! ;-)

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    Via Fori Imperali

    by rcsparty Written Sep 6, 2006

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    This road runs from the 'Typewriter or Wedding Cake' to the Colisseum. You have a great view of the Colisseum down this road. We didn't notice if this is always true, but Sunday mornings, it is closed to traffic and packed with people. It seemed like all of Rome was walking on this road, along with a ton of market stalls and street performers.

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    Trajan Column

    by rcsparty Written Sep 6, 2006

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    Trajan's Column marks the beginning of Trajans market. It was erected in 113 AD and illustrates the war with the Dacians. It is hollow inside and has 185 steps to the top, although it is not open to the public. It is made up of 19 cylindrical blocks. Atop the column sits St Peter, who at some point replaced the original sculpture of Trajan.

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    The Ancient Trajan's Market Place

    by miso80 Written Aug 18, 2006

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    Developed in the 2nd century AD, the roman forums and the whole surrounding area is a place that is soaked with history and culture.. The Trajan Marketplace is a fascinating work of art, and is said to be the world's first shopping mall ;) (Its no wonder you save up for your trip to Italy)!! If you look at the architecture of this market, you'll notice that there were more than 100 shops lined up, and there seem to be corridors passing through the different parts..just like your modern mall.

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    casa dei cavalieri di rodi

    by doug48 Written Jul 25, 2006

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    casa dei cavalieri di rodi

    on the hill overlooking the forum of augustus is the casa dei cavalieri di rodi. this was the medieval roman headquarters of the knights of rhodes, also known as the knights of malta. open to the public by appointment only.

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    forum of augustus

    by doug48 Written Jul 25, 2006

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    forum of augustus

    this forum was built by emperor augustus to celebrate his victory over the assassins of julius caesar, brutus and cassius in 41BC. the columns in the picture are the ruins of temple of mars. much of the forum now lies under the via dei fori imperiali.

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    trajan's market

    by doug48 Written Jul 25, 2006

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    trajan's market

    built in the 2nd century AD trajan's market is considered one of the marvels of the classical world. this multi level building housed shops selling silks and spices from the middle east, produce, clothing, as well as restaurants and drinking establishments.

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    Trajan's Market

    by BorneoGrrl Updated Jul 10, 2006

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    Ruins of Trajan's Market

    Trajan's Market is located at Via dei Fori Imperiale, at the opposite end to the Colosseum, and is the ancient roman market or shopping center. You can walk through the market and imagine yourself back in the days of the Roman Empire. From there, you can also have beautiful views of the Vittoriano.

    Entrance of Trajan's Market is in Via IV Novembre

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