Trastevere, Rome

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  • Trastevere
    by RoscoeGregg
  • The view from Ponte Geribaldi
    The view from Ponte Geribaldi
    by RoscoeGregg
  • Piazza Belli in Trastevere
    Piazza Belli in Trastevere
    by Paisleypaul
  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    Villa Farnesina

    by von.otter Updated Nov 20, 2008

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    Villa Farnesina, May 2007
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    “There was much to please a somewhat peculiar taste in our visit to the Farnesina. … The door-keeper, amiably obese, was better still in her acceptance of the joke with which the hand-mirror for the easier study of the roof frescos was accepted. … In showing a Rubens in one of the rooms, with the master’s usual assortment of billowy beauties, when she could say — and she ought to have known — that they had eaten too much macaroni. It was not much of a joke; but one hears so few jokes in Rome.”
    — from “Italian Journeys” (1867) by William Dean Howells (1837-1920) American author and U.S. Consul in Venice during first Lincoln Administration

    COUNTRY HOUSE Located on the edges of the working-class district of Trastavere, Villa Farnesina was built in 1506 for Agostino Chigi, a rich Sienese banker and treasurer to Pope Julius II. This villa, intended to be a summer pavilion, has a rear wing that opens to a garden that faces the River Tiber. In Antiquity, this was the site of the country villa of Julius Caesar; in 44 B.C. Cleopatra stayed there with their illegitimate child, Caesarion.

    Agostino Chigi enjoyed showing off his great wealth. During dinner parties, as each course ended, the golden dishes were tossed in the river, which was much closer to the villa’s gardens at the time. But the cagey Chigi did not get rich by throwing away money, or gold dishes; nets were placed in the water that caught the plates, allowing the staff to recover the dishes once the guests had gone home!

    In 1577 the Farnese family bought the villa. Because it was smaller than their Palazzo Farnese on the other side of the Tiber, ‘ina,’ the suffix meaning small in Italian, was added to Farnese creating its current name.

    Today, owned by the Italian State, the villa houses the Accademia dei Lincei, a well-respected 17th-century academy of sciences, and the Department for Drawings and Prints.

    Commissioned by Chigi, all fresco decoration in the ground floor Loggia is by Raphael or his followers and date from the villa’s construction. These frescos are sublime. The colors are bright and well preserved; the figures look very real, very human. The two main themes of Raphael’s frescoes in the Loggia depict the world of Cupid and Psyche (see photo #5), and “The Triumph of Galatea” (see photo #3). This second fresco, one of Raphael’s few completely secular paintings, shows Galatea, a nymph almost completely naked, on a shell-shaped chariot amid frolicking attendants and rolling waves. It brings to mind Botticelli’s “The Birth of Venus.”

    Photos are not permitted; but I was able to take three detail picture of the frescos before a guard scolded me, and told me to stop. Originally, the loggia had been opened to the elements; thankfully, for the preservation of these marvelous art works, it is now enclosed.

    On the first floor there are trompe-l’œil frescoes executed by the building’s architect, Baldassare Peruzzi. There are frescoes on the walls surrounding the windows and on the opposite wall of Rome as it looked in the 16th century; if you had been gazing out the window at the time these frescos were painted you would see what is now on the walls. It is an excellent record of the city.

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    Museo di Roma in Trastevere

    by abarbieri Updated Oct 14, 2008

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    The Museum of Rome in Trastevere is located in what was once the Monastery of Sant'Egidio, where discalced Carmelite nuns lived until the capture of Rome. The building was restored and, in 1976, became a museum of Roman folklore and poetry, displaying material on the Roman people and their traditions, which had previously been kept in the Museum of Rome and the Municipal Ministry of the Press.
    In the year 2000 the museum was reopened to public with the name of The Museum of Rome in Trastevere. This most recent refurbishment has been adapted to current museological needs: the building has been designed to be suitable for temporary exhibitions, particularly of photography, shows, conferences and concerts.
    The museum's permanent exhibition focuses on the main aspects of everyday Roman life in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, filtered through the tastes and convictions of the artists and folklorists who described it. Major themes are costume, folk dancing, festivals, both religious and secular, and crafts.
    The collection includes paintings, prints, drawings and watercolours, among them the famous series of "Vanished Rome" by Ettore Roesler Franz (Rome 1845 - 1907), a crib incorporating scenes of daily Roman life in the nineteenth century, and six life-size representations of day to day life in the period, known as "Roman Scenes". The museum also contains some of the personal possessions of the great poet Trilussa (Rome 1871 - 1950), which were donated to the Municipality of Rome after his death and are in part exhibited in the video installation space called after him.

    Closed Monday

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    Today it's trendy

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Aug 11, 2008

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    Trastevere gold
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    Once very much a working class area of the city, shabby and more than a little seedy, a place tourists ventured into briefly,musicians to pay homage to St Cecilia who is buried in the church of her name at one end of the quarter, or maybe to see the mosaics in the Church of Santa Maria in Trastevere, take a few "atmosphere shots" of washing flapping on lines stretched between peeling ochre-painted buildings or a Sunday morning foray into the flea market at Porte Portese - Trastevere these days has become a trendy spot, as popular with bohemian expats and young professional families as it is still the home of families who have lived here for generations.

    You need to cross the Tiber to get here - what better way than to walk across the ancient bridges that connect the two banks of the river at Isola Tiberia? Ponte Fabricio on the Centro Storico side of the island is the oldest bridge in the city, Ponte Cestio isn't much younger - it was built in 46AD. Alternatively, there's the pedestrian Ponte Sisio near Campo de' Fiori, or you could catch Tram No 8 and get off at the first stop once you've crossed the river.

    Trastevere's history has been one of a long slide down and a recent trend up in its desirability as a place to live. The area "across the Tiber" (the meaning of Trastevere) was taken up by noble families in early times - Julius Caesar lived here - and kept his mistress Cleopatra here too. Most of the city's Jews lived here before they were forced into the ghetto in 1555. The 19th century urban renewal of much of the city passed it by and, more than anywhere else, the area retains the look and feel of mediaeval Rome.

    Very popular at night for the restaurants and bars that can be found everywhere, a walk through the quarter in the daytime reveals lovely quiet corners, greenery tumbling over russet and ochre walls, a daily life of children playing and neighbors chatting. We spent time here with an Australian friend who now calls Trastevere her home, complete with a plant-filled garden behind a high wall, local shops and local restaurants where familiar faces bring forth smiles and questions about the bambini and a delicious lunch was ordered after a long discussion with the waiter without recourse to the menu. No "sightseeing ", no shopping - though there are opportunities for both, just a few hours spent doing what Romans have always done so well - enjoying the moment.

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    Get lost in Trastevere.

    by Maurizioago Updated Dec 15, 2007

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    Trastevere is a district in Rome on the west bank of the Tiber. Its name derives from the Latin word "trans Tiberim" that means beyond the Tiber.

    In Trastevere there are lots of restaurants and cafes; some churches and various shops.

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    A Stroll in Trastevere

    by fairy_dust Written Aug 16, 2007

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    A fountain in Trastevere
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    Across the river and south of the Vatican, is the charming little district of Trastevere. It's definitely worth a visit, especially if you're tired of the tourist-filled attractions in downtown Rome. Trastevere has a lot of narrow, cobblestone streets, little shops and restaurants, and beautiful statues and fountains. There is also a beautiful church - Santa Maria in Trastevere. It's not very crowded and there are barely any tourists there. It's nice to spend an afternoon there to explore the neighbourhood, and have a drink in one of the bars there in the evening.

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    Museo di Roma in Trastevere

    by Paisleypaul Written Apr 29, 2007

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    Museo di Roma in Trastevere

    This was formerly the Folklore museum, the MdRiT is the sort of museum other cities have - i.e. it is inclined to Rome's own recent history and 19th and 20th century artists, whreas all of the other museums seem to be aimed at 2000 years ago.

    Trastevere, it has been suggested, replaced Via Vittorio Veneto as the night time haunt for La Dolce Vita. The Museum is typicallu open until 20:00 of an evening and as Trastevere should also be seen in daylight, take a look at the Museo di Roma in Trastevere for content and for the many visitng exhibitions.

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    Basilica of Santa Maria in Trastevere

    by von.otter Updated Mar 15, 2007

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    Santa Maria in Trastevere, 1.January.2001
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    The Basilica of Santa Maria in Trastevere was the first church dedicated to the Blessed Mother, dating from the late third or early the fourth century. One of the first communities of Christians in Rome met here and celebrated mass. Pope Innocent II (1138 –1148) had the church rebuilt in the 12th century.

    Above church’s portico are three arched windows, and above them is a 12th-century mosaic of the Virgin Mary holding the Christ Child; ten lamp-bearing female attendants are on either side of them.

    This church’s wonderfully simple, simply statuesque Romanesque bell tower, like others throughout the city, is a delight.

    Throughout the church’s interior are some late 13th-century mosaics by Pietro Cavallini recounting scenes from the life of the Blessed Virgin. The best known of these, “The Coronation of the Virgin,” is in the apse. The nave’s 22 granite columns, topped by Ionic capitals, are ancient Roman ruins.

    The basilica is located in the Piazza Santa Maria in Trastevere, the heart of working-class Trastevere.

    This church is very beautiful. When there last, New Year’s Day 2001, the church was ablaze with candlelight. There were a number of people seated quietly in the pews, praying, meditating. The atmosphere was peaceful and harmonious. It’s one of the most vivid memories of this trip to the Eternal City.

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    Santa Maria Trastevere Piazza

    by icunme Updated May 22, 2006

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    Trastevere Piazza Santa Maria
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    Photo 1 - We are in the heart of Trastevere. The church was originally built in 499 and restructured in the XIIth century. It has retained the typical facade of the old Roman churches along with the bell tower.

    Photo 2 - On the site of one of the most ancient fountains in Rome, Carlo Fontana built this fine fountain which had coats of arms of Innocentius XII later on modified into coats of arms of Rome.

    Photo and reference text by permission Robert Piperno to be used for non-commercial purpose only

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    Bernini sculpture - Church St Francis Trastevere

    by icunme Updated May 21, 2006

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    Bernini's  Blessed Ludovica Albertoni

    In the Trastevere church of San Francisco di Rippa, St. Francis resided for some time when he came to Rome to gain recognition for his order.
    Just to the left of the alter is a late work by Bernini, where he shows once again his mastery. The Blessed Ludovica Albertoni - and it is reminiscent of Bernini's Ecstasy of Saint Teresa in the church of Santa Maria della Vittoria.

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    When in Rome - do as the Romans

    by Peccavi Written May 16, 2006

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    The fountain at Piazza di Santa Maria

    This is a part of Rome where you will find what you don’t find anywhere else. Regular Romans, living their regular life. Eating out with their friends and families, young boys playing football in front of the local church, or young Romans just hanging out by a fountain. As anywhere else in Rome the fountain they hang out by is old, the church they play by is ancient, and the food they eat is pizza, pasta and ice cream. Its just that in Trastevere its all laid back, its all done in a nice relaxed mood, and with all the people, shops and places to eat you can spend a whole day there just forgetting about Capitol, Forum, The Vatican and Pantheon. The shops you find here are not found anywhere else and the restaurants have prices Romans can live with. Ofcourse there are tourists in Trastevere as well, but since none of the “tourist magnets” of Rome is located in or very near this part of town you don’t find the guided tours trough the area. You really should spend a day, or at least a evening and night in this part of Rome. The nightlife is great.

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    Santa Maria in Trastevere

    by lina112 Updated May 12, 2006

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    Roof

    When you reach the altar on the left side there is a small chapel, is very nice but if you look at the roof you vill see this beautiful paint. When i saw it i could not take my sight of the paint.

    Cuando llegas al altar en el lado izquierdo hay una pequena capilla, es muy bonita pero si miras hacia arriba veras esta maravilla de pintura. Cuando la vi no podia quitar la vista de la pintura de lo bonita que es.

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    Santa Maria in Trastevere

    by lina112 Updated May 12, 2006

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    Santa Maria
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    The Basilica of Santa Maria in Trastevere was on of the first consecrated in Rome.It construction begun in the century III was finished between the years 341-52 and it is the first church dedicaded to Maria (Virgen Maria). During the century XVIII had several restructurations and years later arquitectonic modifications.
    You will see inside 21 romans columns and an spectacular decoration and beautiful altar.
    You can not miss the oportunity to visit this basilica is one of the most important in Rome

    La basilica de Santa Maria del Trastevere fue una de las primeras consagradas en Roma. Su construccion comenzo en el siglo III y acabo entre los anos 341-52 y es la primera iglesia dedicada a la virgen Maria. Durante el siglo XVIII tuvo diversas restructuraciones y anos mas tardes modificaciones arquitectonicas. Su interior es impresionante y es una de las iglesias a las que debes ir.

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    Feel the spirit of Rome

    by SiCkb0y Written Apr 14, 2006

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    While in Rome, there's no better place to spend a relaxing evening than the Trastevere. You can walk through the narrow streets, listen to the street musicians and eat some true italian pizza or lasagne afterwards. Don't forget to order some "Vino della casa" along with the food ;)
    The district can be reached with tram lines 8 and 9 (both stop in front of the Trastevere train station) and bus line 3 (directly from the Colosseo!). After getting off the bus/tram the views aren't really impressive, but don't get discouraged. You'll reach the right part of the district just after a couple of minutes long walk in the direction of S. Maria in Trastevere Church.

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    Heart of Rome

    by AlexDJ Updated Jan 21, 2006

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    Santa Maria in Trastevere Square
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    Trastevere is one of the best part and most typical and caracteristic place to visit. It is particularly known for its nightlife, especially during the summer months, as well as its many excellent resturants and unique small shops. You can also find a lot of bars, pubs and open air shows for the huge quantity of people who always come to visit this area to find some fun! Trastevere also hosts an English movie theater and an English bookstore.
    A lot of tourists choose this area for their accommodation in Rome, so they have the possibility to feel like a typical roman living in the heart of the city!

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  • Spirit of Rome's by-gone days

    by Ailis Written Jan 14, 2006

    Separated from the heart of central Rome by the river, this area of Rome is as old as Rome itself. There are some interesting sites to visit here - the church of Santa Maria in Trastevere and the church of Santa Cecilia in Trastevere. But the main attraction of the area in itself, while walking through its streets or sitting in a trattoria you have a feeling of beeing in a traditional small Italian town.

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