Trastevere, Rome

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  • Trastevere
    by RoscoeGregg
  • The view from Ponte Geribaldi
    The view from Ponte Geribaldi
    by RoscoeGregg
  • Piazza Belli in Trastevere
    Piazza Belli in Trastevere
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  • icunme's Profile Photo

    Bernini sculpture - Church St Francis Trastevere

    by icunme Updated May 21, 2006

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    In the Trastevere church of San Francisco di Rippa, St. Francis resided for some time when he came to Rome to gain recognition for his order.
    Just to the left of the alter is a late work by Bernini, where he shows once again his mastery. The Blessed Ludovica Albertoni - and it is reminiscent of Bernini's Ecstasy of Saint Teresa in the church of Santa Maria della Vittoria.

    Bernini's  Blessed Ludovica Albertoni
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    Santa Maria Trastevere Piazza

    by icunme Updated May 22, 2006

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    Photo 1 - We are in the heart of Trastevere. The church was originally built in 499 and restructured in the XIIth century. It has retained the typical facade of the old Roman churches along with the bell tower.

    Photo 2 - On the site of one of the most ancient fountains in Rome, Carlo Fontana built this fine fountain which had coats of arms of Innocentius XII later on modified into coats of arms of Rome.

    Photo and reference text by permission Robert Piperno to be used for non-commercial purpose only

    Trastevere Piazza Santa Maria Piazza Santa Maria Fountain - Trastevere
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  • Ineedtogo's Profile Photo

    The real Rome

    by Ineedtogo Written Mar 17, 2010

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    Many tourists bypass the real Rome for the touristy things, like the Coloseo, the Vatican, the Forum, the Pantheon, the Trevi fountain. Many of them don't realize that Rome has a soul, where the Romans eat, drink, and socilaize. This soul is called Trastevere. Now often in my visits to Trastevere, I will see a few tourists. However, not nearly as much as I would see by the Trevi fountain or the Vatican. Trastevere, literally meaning "across the Tiber", is the hippest and coolest section of the city. In this dictrict, you will find the city's best restaurants and shops. You will find here, the cathedral of Santa Maria in Trastevere. This is the located in the district's main square, (Piazza Santa Maria in Trastevere), and is the districts main church. The chuch is beautiful, and some parts of the chuch date back to the 4th century. After seeing the district's main attraction, have lunch at a local restaurant. Most of the restaurants in Trastevere serve good food for good prices, just ask a local for their recommendation. Make sure you eat the specialties of Rome, spaghetti carbonara, (with eggs and pancetta), and spaghetti amatrichana. After lunch, just wander around the district. Maybe go shopping, or whatever you would like. Rome is a city that can sometimes be hectic, or overwhelming. But when you visit Trastevere, a section of the city that will captivate you, you will relax and really live the world-famous, Italian dolce vita.

    View of Trastevere Piazza Santa Maria in Trastevere Map showing you where Trastevere is in Rome

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    Today it's trendy

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Aug 11, 2008

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    Once very much a working class area of the city, shabby and more than a little seedy, a place tourists ventured into briefly,musicians to pay homage to St Cecilia who is buried in the church of her name at one end of the quarter, or maybe to see the mosaics in the Church of Santa Maria in Trastevere, take a few "atmosphere shots" of washing flapping on lines stretched between peeling ochre-painted buildings or a Sunday morning foray into the flea market at Porte Portese - Trastevere these days has become a trendy spot, as popular with bohemian expats and young professional families as it is still the home of families who have lived here for generations.

    You need to cross the Tiber to get here - what better way than to walk across the ancient bridges that connect the two banks of the river at Isola Tiberia? Ponte Fabricio on the Centro Storico side of the island is the oldest bridge in the city, Ponte Cestio isn't much younger - it was built in 46AD. Alternatively, there's the pedestrian Ponte Sisio near Campo de' Fiori, or you could catch Tram No 8 and get off at the first stop once you've crossed the river.

    Trastevere's history has been one of a long slide down and a recent trend up in its desirability as a place to live. The area "across the Tiber" (the meaning of Trastevere) was taken up by noble families in early times - Julius Caesar lived here - and kept his mistress Cleopatra here too. Most of the city's Jews lived here before they were forced into the ghetto in 1555. The 19th century urban renewal of much of the city passed it by and, more than anywhere else, the area retains the look and feel of mediaeval Rome.

    Very popular at night for the restaurants and bars that can be found everywhere, a walk through the quarter in the daytime reveals lovely quiet corners, greenery tumbling over russet and ochre walls, a daily life of children playing and neighbors chatting. We spent time here with an Australian friend who now calls Trastevere her home, complete with a plant-filled garden behind a high wall, local shops and local restaurants where familiar faces bring forth smiles and questions about the bambini and a delicious lunch was ordered after a long discussion with the waiter without recourse to the menu. No "sightseeing ", no shopping - though there are opportunities for both, just a few hours spent doing what Romans have always done so well - enjoying the moment.

    Trastevere gold Ponte Cestio Quiet streets leasing to ... A mediaeval palace.... ... and a flower filled garden

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    1689 - San Francesco a ripa

    by belgianchocolate Written Jul 17, 2004

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    'Mattia De Rossi' designed this baroque church.
    The reason why I wanted to visit it and did some
    effort to find this one is because it is
    a Franciscan church. And the spiritual founder
    of this order has been here.
    He visited in 1219 - at that time there was
    a hospitium. They kept his stone cushion
    and his crusifix.

    'Saint Francis of assisi 'has been here.
    (in Dutch - Sint Franciscus van Assisi)
    He was born in 1182 as a son of a rich
    merchant. His father, Pietro Bernardone,
    was a wealthy cloth merchant.
    Well his son was sorth of the 'Paris Hilton'
    of the 12th century. :-) Party here , didn't do
    much study. Well an illness changed his live
    intensively and he became very catholic.
    He also respected nature and animals
    deeply.
    My mom named me after him. She is not very
    religious but she had him in mind when she
    chose 'frank' as my first name.
    (She used to say 'Franciscus' to me when I
    did something wrong)
    If you have ever been before on one of my
    pages you know they are filled with animals
    and nature.

    In the 16th and 17th century this church was
    a bit special. A gang of visionary monks gathered
    around here. The church became a sort of
    airstrip for angels. None of these monks ever
    made it to Saint.

    Untill the second vatican concilie there were
    glass coffins on the pillars with in cowl dressed
    up monks. By a hole on top you could let a
    rosary sink upon them. Strange habbit.

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    Porta Portese Market

    by melissa_bel Updated Jun 18, 2004

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    It's a beautiful Sunday, by chance, you woke up early, why not drop by the Porta Portese Market? Located in the Trastevere neighbourhood, it's a huge flea market where you can find anything (provided you go there early enough). It's packed, noisy,and utterly Roman. You'll find everything from Football jerseys to beach towel, from antique (or antique-looking) religious painting to genuine old books, from faux Gucci bags to real vintage Gucci bags.
    Don't forget to barter though. Having a "banchinna" at Porta Portese is a sign of prestige for vendors and if you want to have a good deal (and gain their respects, which will help lower the price), don't get too impressed by their bartering abilities.
    Try to get there before 9 am, at 10, it's really, really busy and most of the good deals are gone. The market is open until 1:30.

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    Trastevere.

    by chiara76 Written Nov 8, 2004

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    If you are going to go for a nice, romantic and calm walk I really can recommend this place for you.
    It is the old part of Rome, full of old houses, great medieval churches, restaurants...
    You just have to go there for a nice walk and see it yourself.
    There are few nice churches there like the Church of Santa Maria in Trastevere for example with wonderful mosaics and great decor inside.
    The fountain on the Piazza di Santa Maria in TRastevere was designed by Carlo Fontana and it is popular place of meetings of young people there.

    Trastevere.
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  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    Trastevere

    by mindcrime Written Mar 21, 2011

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    We spend a day in Trastevere, a picturesque old district of Rome at the other side of Tiber with a maze of alleys full of old churches, small stores and a lot of restaurants.

    We crossed ponte Sisto, an old bridge(pic 1) that was built in 1474 by Sisto IV to connect Trastevere with Rome. At piazza Trilusa we got lost in the small alleys but we saw many interesting buildings.

    First we saw (at 23 via Santa Dorothea) the Romanesque church Santa Dorothea(pic 2) that was rebuilt in the 18th century and has a nice baroque facade, and it is dedicated to the virgin martyr St Dorothy(4th century).

    A few steps away is located Santa Maria della Scala (pic 3)that was at the end of 16th century and although boring outside it houses some nice paintings like the Beheading of St John(by G.VHonthorst) and Death of the Virgin(by C.Saraceni). In 19th century the church was used as a hospital for Garibalid’s soldiers that got wounded from the fights against the French.

    Unfortunately, most of the churches in Trastevere were closed, the same happened with Sant’Egidio church(pic 4). It was built in 1632 and it is dedicated to St.Giles, a hermit who died in 720. It’s also dedicated to Our Lady of Carmel and that’s why given to the Discalced Carmelites that had an adjacent convent for the poor. Now, it is a small museum of folk art but it was closed during our visit too :(

    Of course, the most famous church in Trastevere is Santa Maria in Trastevere (pic 5) located at a big square where many young people gather during the evening (they usually sit around the fountain in the middle of the square). The church is open daily 7.30-20.00 and has some beautiful mosaic from 12th century. That was probably the date that the church was built although it was this spot where probably the first Christian masses took place in Rome as the church was founded by Kalistos I during the 3rd century. We couldn’t take pictures of the interior because a mass was in progress but we really loved the atmosphere inside.

    ponte Sisto church Santa Dorothea Santa Maria della Scala Sant���Egidio church Santa Maria in Trastevere
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    Basilica di San Grisogono

    by mindcrime Written Mar 21, 2011

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    On our way out of Trastevere we passed from the church San Grisogono(pic 1). It has a nice bell tower that dates back from 12th century although under the church was an older one (probably from 8th century). Pietro Cavalini decorated the interior but what was impressive were the columns (probably from ancient temples) and the mosaic at the floor.

    We crossed the street and we saw Torre degli Anguilara(pic 2), an old tower from medieval era, the only one that can be seen today among the numerous towers that were built. It was part of a house-fortress that belonged to a prominent family of 14th century. The building was bought by the City of Rome in 1887 and it housed a workshop for painted glasses and later turned into hall for lectures on works of Dante Alighieri.

    church San Grisogono Torre degli Anguilara
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  • alza's Profile Photo

    Trastevere 2

    by alza Updated Sep 8, 2010

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    From Bibli, I walked to a small square where I spent some time people watching, taking a few pics, etc. Cafés, gelateria, and a nice church at the heart of it. Families and friends were meeting, everyone in a good "domenica" mood.

    I was at the square by Santa Maria della Scala. The inside of that church is known for its rich baroque design but I wanted to stay outside in the sun so I focussed on the façade as seen from the Gelateria across the square. (Excellent gelato!) (I must admit I was looking for Sta Maria in Trastevere and mistook the Scala place for it awhile...)

    From there to nearby Dar Poeta for a fantastic pizza and some fun reading of poems in Romanesco. The poems are framed on the walls and give the place a real feeling of Rome around 1900 (or so.) Dar Poeta is in a minuscule place along an alley and looked so quiet at first that I wondered if they were open. There were a couple of tables with people obviously regulars, and just the right rhythm of comings and goings. I'll put details under Restaurants. Just mentioning it here as part of that day's itinerary.

    I walked from there to the Janiculum Hill and then for hours, taking my time.

    Arriving Piazza Sta Maria della Scala across from the church My ggranma was a bbeautiful rragazza!

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    Heart of Rome

    by AlexDJ Updated Jan 21, 2006

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    Trastevere is one of the best part and most typical and caracteristic place to visit. It is particularly known for its nightlife, especially during the summer months, as well as its many excellent resturants and unique small shops. You can also find a lot of bars, pubs and open air shows for the huge quantity of people who always come to visit this area to find some fun! Trastevere also hosts an English movie theater and an English bookstore.
    A lot of tourists choose this area for their accommodation in Rome, so they have the possibility to feel like a typical roman living in the heart of the city!

    Santa Maria in Trastevere Square Map of Trastevere

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    Trastevere

    by AndreSTGT Updated May 1, 2004

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    If you want to get away from the hustle and bustle of the Centro Storico, i highly recommend taking a walk over the hills of Trastevere along Passegiata del Gianicolo south of St.Peters. This is one of Rome's most verdant and relaxed areas, and you get some fantastic vistas over the city.
    Going downhill, Via Garibaldi will lead you right into the heart of Rome's prettiest quarter Trastevere where you can relax in one of the many cafés or trattorias that are cheaper and slightly more authentic than the ones downtown.

    View from Passegiata del Gianicolo
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    Villa Farnesina

    by von.otter Updated Nov 20, 2008

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    “There was much to please a somewhat peculiar taste in our visit to the Farnesina. … The door-keeper, amiably obese, was better still in her acceptance of the joke with which the hand-mirror for the easier study of the roof frescos was accepted. … In showing a Rubens in one of the rooms, with the master’s usual assortment of billowy beauties, when she could say — and she ought to have known — that they had eaten too much macaroni. It was not much of a joke; but one hears so few jokes in Rome.”
    — from “Italian Journeys” (1867) by William Dean Howells (1837-1920) American author and U.S. Consul in Venice during first Lincoln Administration

    COUNTRY HOUSE Located on the edges of the working-class district of Trastavere, Villa Farnesina was built in 1506 for Agostino Chigi, a rich Sienese banker and treasurer to Pope Julius II. This villa, intended to be a summer pavilion, has a rear wing that opens to a garden that faces the River Tiber. In Antiquity, this was the site of the country villa of Julius Caesar; in 44 B.C. Cleopatra stayed there with their illegitimate child, Caesarion.

    Agostino Chigi enjoyed showing off his great wealth. During dinner parties, as each course ended, the golden dishes were tossed in the river, which was much closer to the villa’s gardens at the time. But the cagey Chigi did not get rich by throwing away money, or gold dishes; nets were placed in the water that caught the plates, allowing the staff to recover the dishes once the guests had gone home!

    In 1577 the Farnese family bought the villa. Because it was smaller than their Palazzo Farnese on the other side of the Tiber, ‘ina,’ the suffix meaning small in Italian, was added to Farnese creating its current name.

    Today, owned by the Italian State, the villa houses the Accademia dei Lincei, a well-respected 17th-century academy of sciences, and the Department for Drawings and Prints.

    Commissioned by Chigi, all fresco decoration in the ground floor Loggia is by Raphael or his followers and date from the villa’s construction. These frescos are sublime. The colors are bright and well preserved; the figures look very real, very human. The two main themes of Raphael’s frescoes in the Loggia depict the world of Cupid and Psyche (see photo #5), and “The Triumph of Galatea” (see photo #3). This second fresco, one of Raphael’s few completely secular paintings, shows Galatea, a nymph almost completely naked, on a shell-shaped chariot amid frolicking attendants and rolling waves. It brings to mind Botticelli’s “The Birth of Venus.”

    Photos are not permitted; but I was able to take three detail picture of the frescos before a guard scolded me, and told me to stop. Originally, the loggia had been opened to the elements; thankfully, for the preservation of these marvelous art works, it is now enclosed.

    On the first floor there are trompe-l’œil frescoes executed by the building’s architect, Baldassare Peruzzi. There are frescoes on the walls surrounding the windows and on the opposite wall of Rome as it looked in the 16th century; if you had been gazing out the window at the time these frescos were painted you would see what is now on the walls. It is an excellent record of the city.

    Villa Farnesina, May 2007 Tom at the door to the Villa Farnesina, May 2007 ���The Triumph of Galatea���, May 2007 Ceiling Fresco, Diana, May 2007 ���Wedding of Cupid & Psyche��� Detail, May 2007
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    Festa de Noantri

    by AlexDJ Written Jan 9, 2006

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    Festa di Noantri' in mid-July when some of Viale Trastevere and the surrounding streets are blocked to traffic. Filled with stalls, it stays open until the early hours of the morning and culminates with a firework display.

    Dance in typical local clothes

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    Janiculum (Gianicolo)

    by alza Written Sep 8, 2010

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    This is a hill in Rome which is reached from Trastevere. Panoramic view of Rome and outlying areas from the top, at Piazzale Garibaldi for one.

    From the heart of Trastevere (say, near Ponte Sisto), find via Garibaldi and start climbing along this winding road. The road soon takes the name Passeggiata del Gianicolo (Janiculum Promenade.)
    This is a nice way to spend a Sunday afternoon away from traffic, there are interesting monuments along the way and activities for families at the top (manège, pony rides, puppet theater.)

    The battle for the Roman Republic was fought on the Gianicolo, opposing Garibaldi and his patriots to French forces fighting for the Pope. Monuments to the fallen line the passeggiata. A cannon fires from the Gianicolo at noon every day -- I'm missed it unfortunately since I was reading poems at Dar Poeta at the time.

    The Gianicolo is featured in Respighi's Pines of Rome (mentioned in another tip.)

    The most striking monument I saw there was the Acqua Paola, a huge baroque fountain at the beginning of the promenade. Pope Paul V (a Borghese) restored the ancient Roman Aqueduct "Aqua Traiana" and it's been called "Paola" in his memory ever since.
    This beautiful white fountain was fed by sources of Lake Sabatinus, now known as Lake Bracciano, and that last name is inscribed in the monument.

    Another nice view along the way is beside the The Institutum Romanum Finlandiae (Finnish Institute in Rome.) The building is impressive both for its architecture and its great location.
    NOTE: also excellent panorama from the terrace of the Manfredi Lighthouse, above the church called Chiesa Nuova or Sta Maria in Vallicella. The lighthouse was a gift of Italians from Argentina in 1911.

    The road slowly winds its way down to Lungotevere in Sassia near the Vatican.

    Aqua Paola Monument to Garibaldi View to Colli Albani from Finnish Institute

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