Trevi Fountain - Fontana di Trevi, Rome

4 out of 5 stars 340 Reviews

Trevi Fountain, Piazza di Trevi, 00187 Roma, Italy +39 06 0608

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  • Sienlu's Profile Photo

    May your wishes come true

    by Sienlu Updated Nov 13, 2014

    This magnificent piece of art was designed by Italian Architect Nicola Salvi and completed by Pietro Bracci. The man standing in the middle is Neptun (God of the Sea) accompanied by 2 tritons

    It's probably the most famous fountain in the world and the biggest one in Rome. It's also known for making your wishes come true by throwing a coin in it. (about 3000 euros are thrown into the fountain each day)...Mine came true, my girl was born a year after I wished for her. ;) The legend says you wish to one day return to Rome but I made my own wish..ahah

    Definitely one of the highlights of Rome.

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  • GracesTrips's Profile Photo

    Trevi Fountain

    by GracesTrips Updated Nov 2, 2014

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    The Trevi Fountain is located in a short distance from the Spanish Steps so you should combine this visit. You can exit at the Spagna metro station to see the Spanish Steps first or you can exit the Barberini metro station to see Trevi Fountain first.

    The fountain is quite magnificent. It's creation took a long path from 1629 with initial designs by Gian Lorenzo Bernini. Then torn down to create the Salvi Fountain. But Nicola Salvi died in 1751 and then the Trevi Fountain was then finished in 1762 by Giuseppe Pannini.

    The Trevi Fountain is the largest Baroque fountain in Rome and one of the most famous in the world. A nice replica of the fountain can be found at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

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  • TLWiz's Profile Photo

    Closed for Renovations

    by TLWiz Written Oct 14, 2014

    Be aware that the fountain is currently undergoing extensive renovation and is pretty much closed for business. No water and most of the structure is covered in scaffolding and tarps. I gave 5 Stars for when it opens back up in mid 2015

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  • egonwegh's Profile Photo

    The Trevi Fountain. It's huge!

    by egonwegh Updated Jun 13, 2014

    I was really surprised by the size of this well-known fountain. The statues are much larger than life, and they stand against a very impressive backdrop that is about the size of the apartment block where I used to live.

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  • brendareed's Profile Photo

    Trevi Fountain

    by brendareed Written Jun 2, 2014

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    How many fountains in the world have their own website…or their own Facebook page? Or how many fountains have a daily revenue of €3,000 solely from donations (no admission fee). The Trevi Fountain does. It is one of the most popular sites in Rome, attracting crowds of tourists on a daily basis.

    This Baroque style fountain was initially designed by Bernini, who did so much architecture and sculpture in Rome. However, his plan was not carried out many years later after both Bernini and Pope Urban VIII (who commissioned Bernini for the work) had died. While there are some touches from Bernini’s original plans, the final design was by Nicola Salvi with the fountain being finished in 1762 (11 years after the death of Salvi) by Giuseppe Pannini, nearly 150 years after Bernini’s commission.

    The location of the fountain rests at the point where three roads intersect and the ancient aqueduct ends – and this is where the name comes from: three roads in Latin is tre vie, thus Trevi. Ancient Romans would mark the terminal spot with a fountain, a custom that Pope Nicholas V reinstated at the Trevi Fountain area. Today, the fountain uses pumps to keep the water flowing.

    What is it that attracts the tourists? First of all, it is a beautiful fountain. As the largest Baroque fountain in Rome, it is 85 feet tall and 65 feet wide. The white marble sculptures show Neptune in the center with tritons, seahorses, shells, and snakes balancing out the fountain, giving symmetry to the piece.

    So why does the fountain get €3,000 a day in donations? Because there is a legend that if you throw a coin (over your shoulder with your back to the water) into the fountain you will return to Rome. I guess there are lots and lots of people that hope to return to Rome! By the way, the money is used to support feeding the needy in Rome.

    The Trevi fountain has seats for people to sit and watch the fountain at all hours of the day. It gets very crowded with tourists taking photos. Unfortunately, when large crowds of tourists gather, the chance that there will be pickpockets will increase. So before you head to the Trevi fountain, ensure that all your valuables are safely hidden away and stay aware of those around you. Then, grab your camera and a coin and enjoy the Trevi fountain!

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  • gordonilla's Profile Photo

    The Trevi Fountain

    by gordonilla Written Mar 15, 2014

    This was another one of the things you are supposed to see when you visit Rome. I have to admit to finding it a little disappointing, and not so impressive. It was not so busy, but there were many hawkers and people offering to sell you a photograph of yourself and the fountain.

    It was January when I visited so was not warm, but there were many couples who seemed to be in love making a visit to make wishes.

    Trevi Fountain (1) Trevi Fountain (2) Trevi Fountain (3) Trevi Fountain (4) Trevi Fountain (5)

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  • WulfstanTraveller's Profile Photo

    The Trevi Fountain

    by WulfstanTraveller Updated Nov 11, 2013

    This is truly an amazing, stunning fountain. Much of its greatness to me lies in how much it hits you and how powerful an impact it has upon seeing it for the first time, when one enters the piazza from one of the narrow streets, the crashing sound of the falling water progressively getting louder as one approaches, until the site and the sound hit loudly and suddenly as one enters the piazza.

    It is also famous for a scene in the Fellini film, La Dolce Vita, where some characters go into the fountain.

    Trevi Fountain, Rome, 1994
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  • gwened's Profile Photo

    Fountain of Trevi

    by gwened Written Aug 26, 2013

    One of the most if not the most emblematic symbols of laica Rome is the fountain of Trevi. It has been photograph by millions and I am sure plenty here in VT. I came early to avoid the crowd and saw the cleaning of the fountain and collection of coins by the municipal workers.

    Then came back in the afternoon to see the fountain filled with water. Both times, there were hordes of people waiting around it, like a magnet.

    Its really a small place the facade of a building and the fountain is not really big by my standards but its beautifically architecturally stunning, and worth the visit. A bit of history

    A fountain was built in 19 BC by Marco Vipsiano Agrippa, she brought the Virgin water to supply the baths he built the pantheon.The water was described as Virgin in tribute to a girl that would have indicated the source a to the thirsty soldiers. In 1453 Pope Nicola V built the fountain of Battista Alberti in the district "of Trejo", which became "Trevi".The fountain was important for the city which was used to have spring water after using water from the Tiber River for centuries.

    Three centuries later, Pope Clement XII decided to transform it by organizing a contest where he invited the best artists of the time.The challenge was to adorn Rome of a grandiose work and provide him with much of its drinking water. Among the sketches, that of the Roman Nicolò Bianco was chosen. The construction of the fountain lasted 23 years.The triumphal arch is surmounted by a penthouse on which dominate the arms of Pope Clement XII. In the centre, on a rocky base, the statue of the Ocean is on a shell cart dragged by two sea horses guided by tritons.The horses represent the sea rough and calm.The two statues alongside Ocean represent health and prosperity, referring to the beneficial effects of pure water.The bas-reliefs that dominate recall the project of the aqueduct of Agrippa and the legend of the Virgin that indicate the source to the Romans.

    Monumental.

    the front fountain of Trevi with water closeup fountain of Trevi far fountain of Trevi left sided shot of fountain of Trevi the far front fountain of Trevi with water
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  • GentleSpirit's Profile Photo

    Trevi Fountain- Fontana di Trevi

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jul 10, 2013

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    Perhaps the single most famous fountain in Rome is of course the Trevi Fountain. The story says that if you throw a coin in the fountain that it will guarantee your return to Rome.

    The first thing you really notice about the fountain is its massive size. It is 25 meters high and 49 meters wide. It basically takes up and entire square. At first glance you see it and realize it is not a building, the whole thing is just a fountain.

    In 1629 Pope Urban VIII (Maffeo Barberini) commissioned Bernini to draw up plans to make the fountain more dramatic. You will remember from other tips that Bernini had a very close relationship with the Barberini (of Florence) and they used him a great deal once they became popes. Urban VIII was a known generous patron of the arts, though he was also most active in wars.

    The Trevi fountain was finished much later, in 1762 by one Giuseppe Pannini.
    At the center of the statue is the representation of Oceanus, the personification of the World Ocean, a river surrounding the world. Naturally, this would be most appropriate a theme for a fountain, but this location had something to do with it as well as this was where the end of a great aqueduct used to be. So here, water represents not only life, but power.

    An absolute must see in Rome, you can take great pictures of the fountain by day or night as it is wonderfully lit at night.

    They say that about 3,000 euro in coins are thrown into the Trevi Fountain every day. This money is used to fund a supermarket for the poor. I wondered about security because i saw no obvious security to prevent someone from just reaching in and helping themselves to the coins they wanted. Security was very low key during my visit, im sure they were there, but weren't immediately noticeable.

    Trevi Fountain Oceanus
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  • goodfish's Profile Photo

    THAT Fountain

    by goodfish Updated May 15, 2013

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    This is the Grandaddy of Roman Fountains: the biggest, the most ornate, most photographed and the one everyone just has to see. Completed in 1762, the watery, Baroque-style wonder was designed by Nicola Salvi from an earlier plan by Bernini. The central figure on the seashell is Neptune, and his seahorses are guided by two Tritons. Trevi is situated at the intersection of three roads - tre vie, in Italian - hence its name. And as the legend goes, toss a coin over your shoulder into the fountain and you'll be sure to return to the Eternal City. I pitched one in 1973 and have found my way back twice since so there just might be some truth to that story? The revenue from all those tosses goes to charity so if nothing else, it's a good use of some small change.

    The fountain hogs most of the room in its square and what little space it doesn't fill, the tourists do. And they come here in hordes: it's been mobbed every time we've passed through. Still, the thing is so big that you won't have any trouble seeing it; it just won't be a quiet or romantic experience unless maybe you're here very early in the morning or very late at night. Also, no Fellini-like romping in the pool: Anita Ekberg was allowed; you are not. The square is heavily patrolled to keep a hairy eyeball on potential fountain-paddlers and pickpockets.

    http://www.060608.it/en/cultura-e-svago/beni-culturali/beni-architettonici-e-storici/fontana-di-trevi.html

    There's a good, reasonable restaurant, L'archetto, just a block or two from here - see my review on that.

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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    The Trevi Fountain

    by IreneMcKay Written Jan 5, 2013

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    We walked here from the Spanish Steps, but the nearest metro is Barberini on A line. Like the Spanish Steps the fountain was drowning under a sea of people. However, unlike the Spanish Steps you could at least take a good photo of it by fighting your way through or using a zoom. Would never visit this again either, though.

    Trevi Fountain. Trevi Fountain. Trevi Fountain. Trevi Fountain.
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    Piazza Navona e Fontanna di Trevi

    by tvor Updated Nov 28, 2012

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    The Piazza Navona and the Trevi Fountain are wonderful examples of the over the top Baroque era of Rome.

    Piazza navona is an oval piazza built on top of an old Roman circus, that is, stadium. The oval echos the circular race track. The centerpiece is the obelisk and grand fountain designed by the great Bernini. This fountain represents the four quarters of the earth and the great rivers of eachm, Nile, the Danube, the Ganges, and the Rio della Plata. The fountain at one end, showing a moor fighting with a dolphin is one of his as well. The church on the west side Sant'Angese in Agone, was designed by Bernini's great rival, Borromini. The Piazza is filled with cafes, buskers, artists, souvenir sellers and tourists. It might be considered a tourist trap but it's a place filled with energy and definitely worth a look.

    the Trevi fountain isn't that far away and is actually the terminus of an old aquaduct that brought fresh water to the citizens of Rome from up to 20 km away. It was designed by Nicola Salvi in the 18th century. The square itself is small and is dominated by the huge theatrical fountain which is set against the side of a building. The crowds around the Trevi are kind of thick even in off season so you might want to go early. It's popular at night as well because it's lit up.

    Trevi Fountain Fontanna di Trevi at night Trevi fountain detail Piazza Navona Piazza Navona

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  • anilpradhanshillong's Profile Photo

    03-Fountain At 3-Street Junction

    by anilpradhanshillong Updated Nov 19, 2012

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    From the Pantheon to the Trevi Fountain is a 10-minutes’ walk. Once there, you are struck by the compactness of the place. It is an oblong area with the famous fountain at one end, shops opposite it, a church to its side and other buildings all around. I counted 3 streets leading from/into this place, therefore, tre vie or Trevi. The streets are, Via De Crocicchi, Via Poli and Via Delle Muratte.

    The sculptures themselves are imposing, almost 85 ft (26 m) in height by 65 ft (20 m) in width. The central figure is of Oceanus, in Greek mythology the son of Sky and Vesta, the immeasurable river that encircles the globe. He is holding a wand in his right hand and commanding the Tritons (in Greek mythology, a god of the sea, with the head and trunk of a man and the tail of a fish) below him on either side. The figure on our left is shown attempting to tame an unruly sea horse, symbolic of the turbulence of the sea while the one on our right is leading a docile animal and blowing a conch, symbolic of a tranquil sea. The water flows from the feet of Oceanus.

    The two figures on either side of Oceanus exhibits the power of water: the figure on our right, representing Health, holds a cup from which a snake drinks while the figure on our left representing Fertility holds a basket full of fruits while near her left feet is an upturned urn from which water flows. The bas reliefs on the right side above Oceanus, shows the maiden pointing to the Roman soldiers the spot from which a spring emerges. The one of the left depicts Marcus Agrippa supervising the construction of the aqueduct.

    Though Bernini was asked to re-build the fountain, it was Nicola Salvi who designed it in 1732. It was competed in 1762. Originally, Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa had built it around 19 BC. The acqueduct is the Virgo and was 21 kms long but 19 kms were underground.

    The sitting area, in a step-wise fashion, is semi-circular and facing the fountain with three aisles allowing access to the lowest steps. You go down the steps, hunt for a suitable seat, park yourself, unpack your sandwich, open your cold drink and marvel at the sculpture, all the while gazing at the innumerable tourists tossing coins into the fountain. According to tradition, a coin thrown into the fountain guarantees your return to Rome. So you nip down to the base of the fountain, sit with your back to the sculpture, grab a coin in your right hand, pray for a return to Rome and throw your euro over your left shoulder. You’ll see quite a few tourists practice this move a few times before they part with their money. If you can get someone to click you as you execute this move, so much the better. A second coin is believed to ensure an Italian lover and a third coin, marriage to that lover. You can dream on ...

    The fountain has been made famous by quite a few movies, especially, 'Three Coins in a Fountain', 'Roman Holiday' and 'La Dolce Vita'. In the last-named film, the scene of Anita Ekberg frolicking in the fountain, with Marcello Mastroianni joining her a few minutes later, is unforgettable (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKN1T3K1idg).

    When you tire of the crowd and want a bit of shade, peace and quiet, turn back and slip into the Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio a Trevi. This church is adjacent to one of the roads that lead into Trevi Fountain. Built between 1646 and 1650, the church is unique in Rome for two reasons. First is the preservation of 25 embalmed hearts of 25 Popes from Sixtus V to Leo XIII within the Church. The second is the depiction of two bare-chested women supporting a cardinal's coat of arms in the Church's facade. It was originally a Roman Catholic Church. However, since 2002, the Bulgarian Orthodox Church has been using it.

    First Written: Aug. 29, 2012

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Trevi Fountain

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jul 1, 2012

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    The Trevi Fountain is a fountain in the Trevi district. Standing 26 metres high and 20 metres wide, it is the largest Baroque fountain in the city and one of the most famous fountains in the world.
    Appropriately for a fountain resembling a stage set, the theatrical Trevi Fountain has been the star of many films shot in Rome, including romantic films such as "Three coins in a fountain" and "Roman holiday", but also "La dolce vita", Federico Fellini's satirical portrait of Rome in the 1950s.
    Tradition has it a coin thrown into the water guarantees a visitor's return to Rome.

    You can watch my 3 min 20 sec Video Rome walking around the city part 2 out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    Trevi Fountain Trevi Fountain Painters at Trevi Fountain
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  • fabric_letters's Profile Photo

    Fontana di Trevi

    by fabric_letters Written May 27, 2012

    To call it a fountain would be an understatment, the scale of this monumental baroque fountain is amazing and spills 80.000 cubic meter of water (2,824,800 cubic feet) everyday!

    Unbearably crowded as with most of the attrations in Rome but its more than worth a visit.

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