Villa Borghese, Rome

4.5 out of 5 stars 76 Reviews

Via Aldrovandi, Via Raimondi (2 entries), Via Pinciana (2 entries), Piazzale Sao Paulo, Piazzale Flaminio Square Cervantes, Rome Italy +39 06 0608

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  • Bring a picnic
    Bring a picnic
    by goodfish
  • We had a few beers here
    We had a few beers here
    by goodfish
  • One of the park's numerous fountains
    One of the park's numerous fountains
    by Jefie
  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Palazzo Borghese

    by MM212 Updated Dec 14, 2009

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    One of Rome's grandest palaces, Palazzo Borghese belonged to the Borghese family. The palace was originally built in 1560 by the architects Giacomo Barozzi da Vignola and Martino Longhi il Vecchio for the Spanish cardinal Dezza. It was purchased in 1596 by cardinal Camillo Borghese, future Pope Paul V, along with a few adjacent buildings. The future Pope enlarged the palace for his family and employed the architect Flaminio Ponzio for the project. Other renowned architects, such as Carlo Rainaldi, also worked on future projects to enlarge or decorate the palace. The most notable features are its courtyard with its arched porticoes and the nymphaeum. Up until 1891, the palazzo housed the family's incredible collection of European art, which was subsequently transferred to Villa Borghese where it is now on display for the public. The Borghese family still resides in their palazzo, but parts of it have been rented out to various entities, such as il Circolo della Caccia (a private club) and the Spanish embassy. Unfortunately, it is not possible to visit the interior.

    The courtyard of Palazzo Borghese The fa��ade of Palazzo Borghese
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    Villa Borghese

    by roamer61 Updated Oct 3, 2009

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    Located in northwest Rome, this elegant villa dating to the 17th and 18th Centuries is home to one of the finest art collections anywhere. The first floor is devoted to sculpture, both classical and later. Masterworks by artists such as Bernini and Canova are on display. Most notably the spectacular Pauline Borghese by Canova. The upstairs is devoted to paintings and has masterpieces by such artist as Raphael, Carravagio and Ruebens.

    Bags and cameras must be checked and reservations are mandatory. A maximum of 2 hours is allotted for each entry. Though 45 minutes to an hour is enough for most. A cafe is on the premises also.

    The museum is located with the aptly named Borghese Gardens, named for the famous family bearing that name. There are wide lawns, walking paths and numerous benches. All making for an enjoyable and relaxing escape from the hustle and bustle of the city.

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    Villa Borghese LAKE - Tempio di Esculapio

    by icunme Written Aug 17, 2009

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    Imagine a lovely ride in a row-boat on a peaceful lake in the center of Rome! This serene lake in Villa Borghese will take you into a living Monet painting - lush greenery, swans, small row boats seek out little hidden nooks around the lake and the center-piece Tempio di Esculapio. Villa Borghese is an oasis of peaceful serenity in the center of Rome - my favorite get-away. As you stroll through the gardens, paths and, especially the lake - there is a sense of simplicity and calm that will slow your pace.
    Photo 1 - Full View Lake
    Photo 2 - Swan & boat explore the Lake
    Photo 3 - Close-up Tempio di Esculpio
    Photo 4 - Hidden nook in the Lake
    Photo 5 - Rear walkway behind Tempio di Esculpio
    Don't miss the Casina del Lago - restored to house a new charming cafe - right close by the lake amidst the garden on the left. New VT restaurant tip just added.

    Full view of the Lake from front Boat & swan explore the lake Close-up Tempio Hidden nook in Lake Walkway behind Tempio on Lake
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    The Pines of Rome

    by von.otter Updated Apr 16, 2009

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    A species of pine native to Southern Europe in the Mediterranean region, the Italian Stone Pine, commonly called the Umbrella Pine, has been cultivated for its edible pine nuts since prehistoric times. It has a widespread use as a horticultural tree, too. The Umbrella Pine can grow to heights exceeding 82 feet; but the average is height is 35 to 65 feet.

    The reason for its more popular name is clear; the characteristic smooth, round, umbrella-like crown is made up of flexible, needle-like leaves that have a mid-green color. Its edible seeds have been the chief reason for its cultivation for at least 6,000 years, even being used for trade since early-recorded history.

    Although its original range included Spain, Portugal and North Africa, I associate it with Italy and Rome. I know I am in Rome when I see these trees. There is an outstanding example on the Palatine Hill (see photo #4); standing alone with little around it, this tree suits its majestic setting. It can thrive in California, Australia, and Western Europe, as far as north southern Scotland. On America’s East Coast, it can survive as far north as New Jersey; however, there is danger that significant damage to its evergreen leaves will result in the winter when planted that far north.

    This tree has been celebrated in music. Pini di Roma, the Pines of Rome, is a 1924 symphonic tone poem by Italian composer Ottorino Respighi. It is one work in Respighi’s Roman Trilogy, which includes Feste Romane and Fontane di Roma. Each movement portrays the location of pine trees in the city during different parts of the day. First performed under the baton of Bernardino Molinari in the Augusteo, Rome, on 14.December.1924.

    Scientific classification—Kingdom: Plantae; Division: Pinophyta; Class: Pinopsida; Order: Pinales; Family: Pinaceae; Genus: Pinus; Subgenus: Pinus; Species: P. pinea

    Umbrella Pines, Villa Medici, Roma, 05/07 Umbrella Pines, Villa Borghese, Roma, 05/07 Umbrella Pines, Villa Borghese, Roma, 05/07 Umbrella Pines, Palatine Hill, Roma, 05/07 Umbrella Pines, Ostia Antica, May 2007
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    Borghese Museum and Park

    by WheninRome Updated Jan 27, 2009

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    I highly recommend the Borghese Museum and surrounding park, although we had very little time to explore the park due to the onset of night. We were able to walk here from our hotel and did so late in the afternoon of our arrival in Rome. It was nice way to begin our week.

    We purchased our Roma Passes here. Rick Steves recommends making reservations up to a week in advance; however, we arrived about an hour early and had no trouble buying tickets. That might not be wise in the summer though. Even with tickets, you must arrive at least a half hour in advance.

    The beautiful sculptures and paintings were almost too much to behold all at once. Overwhelming to the senses, but a good primer for the week that lay ahead (i.e. Vatican Museum, Colosseum, etc...).

    A fellow VT'r also recommended going to the Etruscan Museum, which is very close to the Borghese Museum, but unfortunately we ran out of time that day and did not get back to this area.

    Borghese Gallery Borghese Park Borghese Gallery at Night Statue at Borghese Gardens

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    When you want to rest your mind

    by Turska Written Oct 13, 2008

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    It was our last day,and we were so tired after two weeks of walking so much every day(and it had been +37to +39c all time-witch I usually love,but when we were so tired,it made us lazy).So even if we usually walk in how hot ever weather and long walks,now we were feeling lazy.So we went her,and only walked very slowly-we even sit 15min on bench-witch we harly ever do at our hollidays.We were planning to go to zoo,but it was quite expensive,and we had seen so much oos around the Europe,that we forgot it.
    The air also felt cleaner here,and they rented some kind of bike-cars.We actually saw one accident done by it.No-one got hurt badly,but old man had broken bike,when young boys drove straight throug him.

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    Giardini Segreti di Villa Borghese

    by sikorka Updated Apr 3, 2008

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    Giardini Segreti (Secret Gardens) are part of Villa Borghese, they are called "secret" because they were private and for exclusive use of the owner. Usually, they are closed for public, but last Saturday we were lucky to enter and see them thanks to the Culture Week in Rome (25- 31 March) and the tour “Visita guidata ai Giardini Segreti del Principe”.

    The Secret Gardens are located right close to Galleria Borghese, the first one was created around the end of XV century and is called "The Garden of Bitter Oranges" (in Italian "dei melangoli" o "aranci amari"). The second one, the beginning of XVI, is called The Flower Garden (dei fiori) and besides beautiful flowers there is unique building of aviary.
    The third one was built around 1680 and on one of its end there is Casino della Meridiana, the building which used to be a snack spot back in XVII ("la casina delle delizie").
    The gardens surely are worth your visit while you will be in Villa Borghese and even though they are usually closed you can see a lot thru the fence.

    The first garden, in the background Casino Nobile The third garden Casino della Meridiana in the third garden
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    One of my favourite places in Rome

    by betako3 Written Jan 8, 2008

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    One of the best sculptures I've seen was in this museum, worth every euro I spent. The display is great, the villa itself is a very handsome building too, and the immence park surrounding it gives you the impression that you somehow managed to escape the city. Cons: time in the museum is limited as I remember to 2 hours (am I correct?), you need to pre-book by phone, and the queue to get tickets and then the time you have to wait to get inside is quite too long (considering pre-booking). But otherwise it's a perfect place to chill out.

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  • WanderingFinn's Profile Photo

    Perfect picnic in romantic park of Villa Borghese

    by WanderingFinn Written Dec 7, 2007

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    A pique-nique in Rome is a must for romantic people. We were there in January, and it was not that cold! The grass was green, no snow, no ice, lake open, people with rowing boats. No gloves needed; it was easy and warm enough to sit down to the grass, lean back to a tree and enjoy the local delicacies.

    Around you you have green grass, very old beautiful trees, birds (even swans in the small lake), some old buildings. Lots of space. Though I guess that during the high season; summertime; the park is more crowded naturally.

    One of our best day trips during the stay in Rome.

    The Roman style old small buidling, lake, swan... A small lake with swans and old buildings, trees Husband opening a bottle of Italian wine Pique-nique with wine, cheese, ham, olives... People with rowing boat. Doesn't seem like January
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  • rita_simoes's Profile Photo

    Nature in the City

    by rita_simoes Written Nov 11, 2007

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    If you get tired of visiting museums, ruins and churches, and you want to catch some fresh air and relax for some hours, I suggest a visit to Villa Borghese.

    The entrance near Piazza del Popolo offers an amazing view of the square and the surrounding areas.

    There are a lot of things to do: you can rent a bike or a 'riccio' (a kind of bike for two people), a boat, go to the Zoo (called Bioparco), or just sit and relax in one of the benches, watching silly people like me and my boyfriend trying to ride a 'riccio'. If you do rent one, be sure it's a semi-automatic, because the normal one is just too hard to ride!!

    museum

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  • Thommmo56's Profile Photo

    Picnic

    by Thommmo56 Written Nov 8, 2007

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    For a quite day, we caught the underground train to the Borgese Gardens (the train stops within a short walk), at the station there was a supermarket where we picked up an assortment of cheeses, meats and bread, plus the ever present bottle of vino.

    We found a nice shaddy position under a tree and had a most pleasant afternoon in the cool of the park.

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    Villa Borghese Park

    by aquatic Written Oct 4, 2007

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    Leave a lest 2 hours for this park to see at least one part of it. It was ment to walk slowly in it and enjoy the view...
    Most of the tourist run through it or don't even see it after a visit to villa.
    Great landscaping will calm your tourist appetittes and will help you to remember it as wonderfull moments among trees and happy families in Rome...

    Villa Borghese Park, Rome
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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    Villa Borghese

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated May 18, 2007

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    One of the most beautiful public parks in Rome, also home to the Galleria Borghese, an art collection in the former residence of the noble and influential Borghese family.

    When I visited Rome, a reservation for the Galleria was necessary, and the the visting time was limited to two hours.

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    Overwhelming

    by NedHopkins Written Oct 28, 2006

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    Villa Borghese ranks with the Uffizi in Firenze and the Vatican Museum as a treasure-trove of Renaissance paintings. No photography is allowed inside (though sneaks with camera-phones took pictures during our visit).

    The numbers of visitors is strictly limited: it's wise to make reservations well ahead of the day you want to visit. One source is selectitaly.com.

    The day we visited the staff was having a union meeting. The line, or mob, outside the entryway included both "9 o'clock" and "11 o'clock" people. The niners had been waiting for over two hours by the time the door was opened. Some of them grew furious -- we feared something akin to a riot might erupt -- when the staff announced that we 11 o'clockers would be allowed in first, the the 9 o'clockers only as people from our time-group exited.

    The turmoil made our visit less rewarding than it might otherwise have been. We were, however, overwhelmed by the works we saw and admired -- paintings by masters like Raphael and, the museum's most notorious work, Canova's nude sculptue of Bonaparte's sister, Pauline.

    Villa Borghese
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    Goethe statue sets trend in Villa Borghese

    by icunme Updated Aug 19, 2006

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    In 1903 the German Emperor William II commissioned a statue to commemorate the Roman sojourn of Goethe and this was placed in Villa Borghese. Other governments followed and meet many world renowned poets: Puskin, in particular seems to enjoy the Roman sunshine and rightly so, as he was used to the never-ending Russian winter nights. The Persian Firdousi and the Egyptian Shawky were more accustomed to a bright light. Many other notables can be found in the busts that adorn Piazza Bucarest on the Villa Borghese's Pincio.

    Photo and reference text by Permission Roberto Piperno - granted for non-commercial purpose only. Visit Roberto's website: http://www.romeartlover.it/

    Goethe in Villa Borghese Goethe has his own little mound
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