Walking, Rome

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  • Walking
    by brendareed
  • If you don't walk you won't spot this....
    If you don't walk you won't spot...
    by leics
  • ....or this.
    ....or this.
    by leics
  • fairy_dust's Profile Photo

    Walking

    by fairy_dust Updated Jun 7, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Yes, I walked all over town in these shoes!

    Walking is one of the best ways to explore Rome. That way, you can see the city itself instead of just the inside of a subway/bus car and what's surrounding the tourist attractions. On my first night, I walked from Piazza di Spagna, to the Trevi Fountain, to the Piazza del Popolo, to the river, down the river, and across a bridge to St. Peter's Square, and though my feet took quite a beating, I loved every minute of it! If you have the time and/or are visiting Rome without a set schedule, I highly recommend taking the time to stroll around the city to explore on your own.

    Be sure to wear comfortable shoes. I managed in strappy high-heel sandals but I'm a dancer - we have tough feet. There are a lot of cobblestone streets in Rome and you don't want to end up with a sprained ankle. One thing that did annoy me at times is when I'd be walking on a cobblestone street, and the skinny heel on my sandal would sink into the space between the stones and get stuck. That meant I had to yank my foot out and it could be dangerous whenever I happened to be in the middle of the street.

    Also, watch out for the traffic - drivers (both car and motorbike) are crazy. I once nearly got run over by a motorbike that jumped the curb onto the sidewalk, so don't think you're safe even if you're on the sidewalk!

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  • brendareed's Profile Photo

    Walking around the city

    by brendareed Written Jun 2, 2014

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    Once we got into Rome, we walked just about everywhere. This is what we do on most of our trips unless we absolutely have to get somewhere too far away to walk.

    I found Rome to be a very easy city to walk in. There are only a few hills, but the majority of sites are located on a flatter part of the city. I was surprised at how compact everything was and how close the various sites are to each other.

    We divided our days in Rome to specific locations which also cut down on the amount of walking required. Rather than zig-zag back and forth, we focused on all the sites in a particular area for the day before moving on. This can be a challenge depending on what you are seeing and if the site/church closes for several hours in the afternoon. Do your research ahead of time and set up a schedule if you want to avoid walking all over the place.

    Taxis, buses, and the metro are available if you need them, but my recommendation is to put on a good pair of walking shoes and see the city from the pavement!

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Walk........or not.......

    by leics Updated Jul 25, 2012

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    Walking....
    3 more images

    Central Rome is eminently walkable...its historical centre is compact, and walking is very much the norm (as it is in all European cities and towns). You won't be alone (unless you are walking in the early hours of the morning) and you will be perfectly safe as long as you use normal city common sense precautions.

    And you will see so very, very much more if you walk as much as you can.

    Rome also has an excellent and efficient public transport system: buses, trams and Metro (and some suburban trains to places such as Ostia Antica). so you can walk until your feet can walk no more, then just hop on a bus, or a tram, or take the Metro back to wherever you are staying.

    You can buy tickets from some tabacchi (cigarette/tobacco sellers, signed with a white 'T' on a blue background, or a black T on a white background), from some newstands and from machines dotted about the city. A single ticket lasts 70 minutes on all forms of transport.

    The easiest thing is to buy a 3-day ticket (also available for other periods). This will cover any and all bus, tram, Metro and suburban train rides you take over those 3 days; it only needs validating once, at the start of your first journey. Make sure you always have it with you, and that you have filled in your name and date of birth on the back: inspectors do check, and they don't always wear uniforms (though they do carry ID, so check it).

    The simplest places to purchase such a travel pass are the booths at the Termini bus station. Strangely, you won't get it from the bus information building there: look for the little row of booths near the Metro entrance in the bus station. At the moment (July 2012) there is a massive construction project in this area, part of the new Metro line, so you'll have to wander a little bit more to find the booths. But they are still there (I checked).

    The carabinieri (police) at Termini, by the way, seem to have abandoned their Segways since my last visit. They now use a rather nifty golf buggy to get around!

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  • azz8206's Profile Photo

    From the Colosseum to the Forum to the Pantheon

    by azz8206 Updated Jul 21, 2010

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    View of the Colosseum from the Palatine Hill
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    Rome is a very walkable city. You can walk in Rome and see so many things. In an afternoon I went from the Colosseum inside and out then walked through the Palatine Hill and into the Forum. I then walked through Piazza Venezia down the street Via del Corso which is right in front of the monument and on to the Pantheon which is on the left hand side of the street, there are signs that will guide you. It took me about 5 hrs and I'm a big guy. And all this wouldn't cost you much money. Only 10 euros for the entrance to the Colosseum and the Forum or if you have the Romapass it won't cost you anything.

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  • jlanza29's Profile Photo

    Bring a good pair of walking shoes !!!!!

    by jlanza29 Updated Sep 21, 2009

    Just as in Paris, and London, Rome is great on foot, the metro drops you off close to the major sites but a good amount of your time getting to places from the metro is on foot !!!! Be warned the walks are great but look down to make sure your foot doesn't get caught in between the crack of the 1,000 year old streets !!!!! Bring good shoes, if not you'll regret it !!!!!

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  • WheninRome's Profile Photo

    Rome is Meant for Walking

    by WheninRome Written Feb 10, 2009

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    Narrow Street Lit Up With Lights

    Rome is a wonderful city to walk in. I was surprised at first how quickly you can get from one point to another in Rome by walking. For example, we walked from the Borghese Museum back to our hotel near Fiume Square with no problem. Same with the Roman Forum to Pantheon and then on to Trevi Fountain. In some areas, like through Trastevere around Piazza Navona, walking through the narrow streets, window shopping and popping in the various shops is the only way to get around.

    One word of caution however, the walking surfaces are virtually all hard stone so wear comfortable shoes. After a week of a lot of walking, our feet were definitely sore; however, if we had uncomfortable shoes on it would have been much worse.

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  • marielexoteria's Profile Photo

    We walked and did "pay as you go"

    by marielexoteria Updated Dec 22, 2008

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    Our hotel was centrally located for the places we wanted to visit, so that's why we chose to walk to most places and then take the subway for those who weren't that close. We also plan so that we can "hit" several adjacent sights on the same zone.

    For subway tickets, we chose to buy a BIT, valid for 1 trip within 75 minutes.

    Always remember to validate your ticket and keep it with you throughout your whole journey. You don't want to get a juicy fine because you either didn't validate your ticket or didn't have one, if a controller catches you.

    The link below will give you updated info about the transportation tickets and a useful route planner.

    Pictures coming up.

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  • Paisleypaul's Profile Photo

    Shortcut for walkers !

    by Paisleypaul Updated Jan 11, 2007

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    Via del Traforo,off Via del Tritone,near Barberini
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    It is appalling - the length of time it took me to figure this ! We all know you wear out a few pairs of boots, the amount of walking you do in Rome. However , there is a great shortcut through the tunnel under the Quirinale, but it is never on any maps as they always show the Quirinale itself.
    It runs from very near the Trevi, just outside the Albert pub (see Nightlife Tip) in Via del Traforo to the short Via Milano, which leads to Via Nazionale. This is the main shopping street from Piazza Republicca (near Termini) to Piazza Venezia (Monumento Vittorio Emanuele II). A revelation when you first try it ! Not too many tourists in the know either as there is regularly just half a dozen - at very most - people walking it at any one time. Ther are small pavements(sidewalks) either side of the road.

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  • magyarozag's Profile Photo

    Transportation in Rome

    by magyarozag Written Dec 29, 2006

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    Most Romans get around by Scooters

    When you are in Rome you don't really need transportation. From the the Presidents Summer Palace you can see the Vatican at the other end of the city which just shows how small Rome is. I managed to walk to every place I wanted to go within twenty minutes of starting out. (Also having a hotel in a central position helped) The city did also have an efficient Metro system, bus service and taxi service.

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  • IckleHelen's Profile Photo

    You will do a lot of walking in Rome

    by IckleHelen Written Nov 26, 2006

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    We stayed in a hotel around the Castro Pretorio Metro station, which on the map doesn't look all that far so I didn't bother finding out about the transportation. However once you walk to and from the tourist attractions and walk around/up them it all adds up to a lot of walking.

    My advice, even if you think you will walk everywhere it's worth finding out about public transport anyway.

    We were surprised to find that the underground shuts at about 9:30pm so you have to get a bus after this time if your hotel is a little further out as ours was. We found the number 64 very useful in getting from Termini (Central Train Station) to the Piazza Navona Area. I don't know how often this bus runs, but it was always at the train station when we went there so I guess it's pretty frequent.

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  • illumina's Profile Photo

    On Foot

    by illumina Written Jul 5, 2006

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    The best way to get to know any place is to walk around it, and Rome is a fairly easy place to get around on foot. You can walk from one ancient site to another, you're constantly surrounded by fascinating ruins. Just make sure you know where you want to go and what you want to look at in each area, otherwise you will find yourself going backwards and forwards covering the same ground. We got to know certain routes very well indeed!

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  • Jenniflower's Profile Photo

    On your back!

    by Jenniflower Updated Mar 16, 2006

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    Ready to go!

    My brother found this back carrier really helpful when carrying his daughter around. Often, the roads are not very child-friendly, and a toddler trying to traverse these pathways would hold everyone up they would be going s slowly, plus they could get hurt quite easily. It is also a good thing to have as buggy/prams are difficult to use on many roads in Rome. This is only advisable for young, light children though, as you will have a certain amount of back pain otherwise!

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  • chiara76's Profile Photo

    The best go on foot

    by chiara76 Updated Feb 14, 2006

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    Well, there is the underground in Rome and also the trams and buses are there and of course taxis but to be honest in my opinion the best way to sightseeing of Rome is go on your own foot.
    To be honest the underground there is not very pleasant comparing to the Lisbon's one for example.
    The underground in Rome is too crowded and the trains go not very often. It is also very stuffy there and we used it only twice when we really had to do it.
    I also noticed that the underground there is not very useful for handicapped people.

    see the page:
    http://www.virtualrome.com/english/trasporti/mappe/metropolitana.htm

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  • baronedivandastad's Profile Photo

    Walking rules

    by baronedivandastad Written Jul 14, 2005

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    If you spot this car, you're safe: it's mine.

    A city with 2.3 million cars deserves a walking tip. While most of Rome's centre is pedestrianized, you'll occasionally have to cross a street with lots of traffic. Here's a couple of useful rules.

    1) Remember that 90% of traffic deaths and injuries come from pedestrians, and take care.

    2) Find the nearest zebras or traffic lights, then start crossing with moderate and constant speed, always looking to the forthcoming driver (there'll be one). Don't wait for drivers to stop, just walk ahead and don't panic: they will.

    3) If you don't feel safe crossing at some point, walk ahead or back a few hundred meters, and you'll most probably find zebras or at least a place with better visibility.

    4) Follow the flow, do as the Romans do.

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  • IIGUANA's Profile Photo

    Walk

    by IIGUANA Written Feb 28, 2005

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    Rome is quite "walkable". I mean, the city has many interisting spots, and between these spots, walking along the small streets is definately beautiful. The streets, the architecture and the smells of the city are quite enjoyable.
    Don't even think of renting a car, because Rome is not a city for cars. Don't even think of renting a motorcycle, as you probably won't have the guts that romans do to ride them, and don't even think of taking a cab, as they're very expensive for such short rides.
    So walk. And enjoy.

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