Arco della Pace - Arch of Peace, Milan

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Parco Sempione

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  • Arco Del Pace from the Park
    Arco Del Pace from the Park
    by TooTallFinn24
  • Arco Del Pace
    Arco Del Pace
    by TooTallFinn24
  • Arco della Pace - Arch of Peace
    by lina112
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    Arco Del Pace in Parco Sempione

    by TooTallFinn24 Updated Jul 3, 2013

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    The Arco del Pace was not something we set out to see. However leaving Sforza Castle and walking into the large lush Parco Sempione the arch is hard to miss.

    Started in 1807 by the architect Luis Cagnola, the arch was intended to celebrate Napoleon's victory in Italy. However numerous delays and issues caused the arch not to be completed until 1838 under the Austrian rule of Milan. At one time the plan was to link the arch in Milan with the central boulevard of Paris. Unfortunately of course that never happened.

    The bronze chariots on the attic of the arch are particularly impressive.

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    Arco della Pace

    by basstbn Written Mar 18, 2013
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    To me, the most interesting aspect of the Arco della Pace (Peace Arch) is the story about why the horses face the direction they do:

    Construction of the neo-classical monument began in 1807. At that time, it faced Paris in honor of Napolean whom the Italians hoped and believed would bring the ideals of the French Revolution to their country. When locals became fed up with the emperor's rule, they turned the horses around so their tail ends faced Paris.

    In 1861, the Peace Arch was the site of King Vittorio Emanuele's triumphal entry into Milan.

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    Arch of Peace

    by leffe3 Written Aug 10, 2011

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    Although built in the early 19th century, the Arco della Pace corresponds with the location of the Roman walls of Milan and the Porta Giovia.

    It was Napoleon, following his conquering of Lombardy and Milan, who commissioned the building of the Arch of Peace in 1807, celebrating his triumphant victory (and thus adding to his many 'triumphant' arches, including the Arc de Triomphe in Paris).

    Napoleon didn't get to see it - the Austrian defeat of the French army saw the project abandoned until 1826, when work once again started and it as completed in 1838.

    Neoclassical in design, it's 25 metres high and features bas-reliefs and statues celebrating historical events of Italy and Europe as well as mythology.

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    The Arch

    by lina112 Written Aug 2, 2008

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    The works for arch construction started in 1806 thanks to Luigi Cagnola, who was asked by Napoleon to build a celebrative arch. After Napoleon’s defeat of Waterloo, the arch was not completed and in 1826 Franz I of Austria ordered to finish the construction with some alternations, because he wanted to dedicate the Arch to the European Peace reached in 1815. When Cagnola died in 1833, the Arch was finished by Francesco Peverelli and Francesco Londonio. It was inaugurated on September 10th, 1838 by the Emperor Ferdinand I of Austria.

    Los trabajos para la construcción del arco empezaron en 1806 gracias a Luigi Cagnola, al cual Napoleón pidió construir un arco celebrativo. Después de la derrota de Napoleón en Waterloo, el arco no se llevó a términe y en 1826 Francesco I de Austria ordinó que la construcción fuera terminada pero con algunas alternativas, porque él quiso dedicar el Arco a la Paz Europea alcanzada en 1815. Cuando Cagnola murió en 1833, el Arco fue llevado a termine por Francesco Peverelli y Francesco Londonio. Se inauguró el 10 de Septiembre 1838 por el Emperador Ferdinando I de Austria.

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  • icunme's Profile Photo

    Arch of Peace

    by icunme Written Sep 30, 2006

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    At the behest of Napoleon to celebrate his triumphant victory, construction started in 1806 was only two-thirds completed when Napoleon was defeated at the Battle of Waterloo. After Napoleon’s defeat of Waterloo, the arch was not completed and in 1826 Franz I of Austria ordered to finish the construction with some alternations, because he wanted to dedicate the Arch to the European Peace reached in 1815. When Cagnola died in 1833, the Arch was finished by Francesco Peverelli and Francesco Londonio. It was inaugurated on September 10th, 1838 by the Emperor Ferdinand I of Austria.

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    Arco della Pace

    by buzzz Written Jul 29, 2006
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    The day we were in Milan we took a walk through the Parco Sempione. The was a kind of afternoon tea dance taking place. All the kids were looking on and respectfully clapping the dancers. Not so sure that would happen in UK!!! Anyway, overlooking the park is the beautiful Arco della Pace (Arch of Peace) It was built to mark Napoleon's entry into Milan.

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    Arco della Pace

    by Diana75 Updated Jun 7, 2006

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    The impressive Arco della Pace (Peace Arch), made in 1807 by Luigi Gagnola was supposed to be the gate through which Napoleon would have made his entrance to Milan.

    But Napoleon did not succeed in celebrating its completion and the arch was inaugurated by Ferdinand I of Austria on 10 September 1838.

    As one of the best examples of Milanese Neoclassical art, the arch is decorated with bas-reliefs and scenes illustrating the many events before the fall of Napoleon.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Arco della Pace

    by Willettsworld Written Sep 18, 2005

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    In the middle of Piazza Sempione there is this huge monument 25 meters high, that dates back to Napoleonic era. Arco della Pace (Arch of Peace) is built in Neoclassical style, and is decorated with marble sculpture and Corinthian columns, and on the top there is a charming bronze “Sestiga”, a chariot drawn by six horses. It was built in 1826 by architect Luigi Cagnola to commemorate peace in Europe after defeat over Napolene in 1815.

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  • Pieter11's Profile Photo

    The Arco della Pace

    by Pieter11 Written Feb 2, 2005

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    In 1801 the walls around the Castello Sforzesco were destroyed by Napoleon. This provided the space that now is marked by the Piazza Sempione. But there also had to come a monument that marked the entrance to the city centre.

    The construction of the Arco della Pace, The Arch of Peace, started in 1807 and wasn´t completed until 1838. The construction went under supervision of the neoclassical architect Luigi Cagnola. He was inspired by the Arch of Settimo Severo in Rome. The result is a structure of 4 columns with two isolated boxes at both sides.

    It is made of granite, coming from Baveno and is decorated with marble coming from Crevola di Ossola. And the arch is decorated by the famous “sestiga della pace”, a chariot drawn by six horses and with 4 other statues.

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    Arch of Peace

    by antistar Written Jan 8, 2005

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    Arch of Peace, Milan

    It is said that if you walk in a straight line from the Arch of Peace down the Corso Sempione in front of it, you will eventually arrive at the Arc de Triomphe in Paris. There is a connection. The Arch of Peace in Milan was initiated by Luigi Cagnola in 1807 to celebrate the victories of Napoleon. The arch was only two-thirds completed when Napoleon was defeated at the Battle of Waterloo, but in 1826 Franz I of Austria ordered that it be completed, with a few alterations, and dedicated the European peace of 1815. This grand and famous monument, topped with bronze chariot with six horses, seems now sadly to have become a barren place, populated by the homeless and drug addicts. One guy was preparing to jack up on the steps overlooking the monument, completely oblivious to me taking pictures right next to him.

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    The Arch of Peace

    by Henrik_rrb Written Jan 7, 2005

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    Parco Sempione, with the Arch of Peace in the back

    At the end of Parco Sempione, seen from the Castello Sforzesco, you’ll find the Arco Della Pace, Milan’s answer to the Triumphant Arc in Paris. It was built to celebrate Napoleon, although he lost the battle at Waterloo before the Arc was finished.
    Later on, when Napoleon and wars was nothing you wanted to celebrate anymore, the Arc was instead dedicated to peace.
    The Arch of Peace is nowadays unfortunately not in so good shape anymore.

    If you prefer to watch something else the Parco Sempione itself is very nice, at least during the days. A lot of people goes there for relaxing, playing football, or talking to their friends.

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  • Krystynn's Profile Photo

    Arco Della Pace

    by Krystynn Written Jun 21, 2003

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    Arco Della Pace

    This is Milan's version of the Triumphant Arch. Officially known as Arco Della Pace (pronounced as "Ah-Ko Del-la Par-cheh') or in English - the Arch of Peace, this monument is located in Parco Sempione, right behind the Sforza Castle.

    The Arch was originally conceived to celebrate Napoleon, who was, however, defeated at Waterloo before its completion. In 1826 Emperor Francis I of Austria had it completed, dedicating the arch to peace.

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