Chiese - Churches, Milan

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  • Chiese - Churches
    by Oleg_D.
  • Chiese - Churches
    by Oleg_D.
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    Mocking of Christ
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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria in San Satiro

    by croisbeauty Updated Jan 30, 2014

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    San Satiro
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    Santa Maria in San Satiro embodies the architectural concept of the great architect Donato Bramante. Few traces are left of the original building built by Bishop Ansperto in the 9th century; in 1478 Bramante was commissioned with rebuilding and enlarging the church.
    Bramante used a single aisle, T-shaped plan, but with an exceptionally large nave and transepts whose grandeur extends right up to the semi-circular dome. By using a clever perspective device, Bramante gives the interior the appearance of a Greek cross, where the presbytery is actually only an optical illusion. A similar spatial feeling is achieved in the adjoining Sacristy.
    The pure lines of the Romanesque baptistery develop into a play of perfectly defined and circumscribed shapes.

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    La basilica di Sant'Eufemia de Chalcedon

    by Oleg_D. Updated Nov 19, 2013

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    The Basilica of Saint Euphemia was probably founded around 472 A.D. by the Bishop of St. Senator from Settala who participated in the Council of Chalcedon and from there brought a relic of the saint to whom the church is dedicated back to Milan.
    The church was then rebuilt in the XV-th century and then rebuilt again in the following centuries thanks to the intervention of important patrons. Here in 1564 was baptized Federigo Borromeo the nephew of Cardinal Carlo Borromeo also known as San Carlo or Saint Charles and the future Archbishop of Milan. That “saint” left after him the very bloody traces in Switzerland.
    In 1870 the architect Henry Terzaghi created the current high central hall eliminating three naves. Facade was also rebuilt. That’s why today we have, although beautiful, but built mostly in XIX-th century church. Only one real medieval fresco survived till nowadays.
    Admission is free but any kind of donations is welcomed and highly appreciated.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial pictures without flashlight and tripod.
    Open:
    From Monday through Saturday, 07:45 – 12:00 and from 15:30 to 18:30
    Sundays and Holidays, from 07:45 – 12:00 and from 16:00 to 18:30

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    La basilica di Sant'Eufemia de Chalcedon. Interior

    by Oleg_D. Updated Nov 19, 2013

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    The Basilica of Saint Euphemia was probably founded around 472 A.D. by the Bishop of St. Senator from Settala who participated in the Council of Chalcedon and from there brought a relic of the saint to whom the church is dedicated back to Milan.
    The church was then rebuilt in the XV-th century and then rebuilt again in the following centuries thanks to the intervention of important patrons. Here in 1564 was baptized Federigo Borromeo the nephew of Cardinal Carlo Borromeo also known as San Carlo or Saint Charles and the future Archbishop of Milan. That “saint” left after him the very bloody traces in Switzerland.
    In 1870 the architect Henry Terzaghi created the current high central hall eliminating three naves. Facade was also rebuilt. That’s why today we have, although beautiful, but built mostly in XIX-th century church. Only one real medieval fresco survived till nowadays.
    Admission is free but any kind of donations is welcomed and highly appreciated.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial pictures without flashlight and tripod.
    Open:
    From Monday through Saturday, 07:45 – 12:00 and from 15:30 to 18:30
    Sundays and Holidays, from 07:45 – 12:00 and from 16:00 to 18:30

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    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel
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    La basilica di Sant'Eufemia, Chapel and frescoes.

    by Oleg_D. Updated Nov 19, 2013

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    The Basilica of Saint Euphemia was probably founded around 472 A.D. by the Bishop of St. Senator from Settala who participated in the Council of Chalcedon and from there brought a relic of the saint to whom the church is dedicated back to Milan.
    The church was then rebuilt in the XV-th century and then rebuilt again in the following centuries thanks to the intervention of important patrons. Here in 1564 was baptized Federigo Borromeo the nephew of Cardinal Carlo Borromeo also known as San Carlo or Saint Charles and the future Archbishop of Milan. That “saint” left after him the very bloody traces in Switzerland.
    In 1870 the architect Henry Terzaghi created the current high central hall eliminating three naves. Facade was also rebuilt. That’s why today we have, although beautiful, but built mostly in XIX-th century church. Only one real medieval fresco survived till nowadays.
    Admission is free but any kind of donations is welcomed and highly appreciated.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial pictures without flashlight and tripod.
    Open:
    From Monday through Saturday, 07:45 – 12:00 and from 15:30 to 18:30
    Sundays and Holidays, from 07:45 – 12:00 and from 16:00 to 18:30

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    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

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    San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore. Details.

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 24, 2013

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    That beautiful church was built in Milan, Lombardy between 1503 and 1518 as a subordinate church of Benedictine female Convent of Maggiore Monastery. In fact that church stands on the place of ancient hippodrome that’s why the archeological museum is billeted in the buildings of former monastery.
    Church and museum are worth to visit. Church has many excellent frescos with scenes from the Holy Bible and Gospels. Among the painters worked here were famous Antonio Campi, Bernardino Luini and his son Aurelio and Simone Peterzano. Just have a look at that beauty and be convinced that church is the must see place in Milan.

    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed. Admission to church is free.
    Working hours:
    09:30-17:30 from Tuesday through Saturday

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    San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore. Favorite.

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 24, 2013

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    Juda received his silver
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    That beautiful church was built in Milan, Lombardy between 1503 and 1518 as a subordinate church of Benedictine female Convent of Maggiore Monastery. In fact that church stands on the place of ancient hippodrome that’s why the archeological museum is billeted in the buildings of former monastery.
    Church and museum are worth to visit. Church has many excellent frescos with scenes from the Holy Bible and Gospels. Among the painters worked here were famous Antonio Campi, Bernardino Luini and his son Aurelio and Simone Peterzano. Just have a look at that beauty and be convinced that church is the must see place in Milan.
    Here attached the pictures with some of my favorite frescos from that church.
    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed. Admission to church is free.
    Working hours:
    09:30-17:30 from Tuesday through Saturday

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    San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore, II.

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 24, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    That beautiful church was built in Milan, Lombardy between 1503 and 1518 as a subordinate church of Benedictine female Convent of Maggiore Monastery. In fact that church stands on the place of ancient hippodrome that’s why the archeological museum is billeted in the buildings of former monastery.
    Church and museum are worth to visit. Church has many excellent frescos with scenes from the Holy Bible and Gospels. Among the painters worked here were famous Antonio Campi, Bernardino Luini and his son Aurelio and Simone Peterzano. Just have a look at that beauty and be convinced that church is the must see place in Milan.

    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed. Admission to church is free.
    Working hours:
    09:30-17:30 from Tuesday through Saturday

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 24, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    That beautiful church was built in Milan, Lombardy between 1503 and 1518 as a subordinate church of Benedictine female Convent of Maggiore Monastery. In fact that church stands on the place of ancient hippodrome that’s why the archeological museum is billeted in the buildings of former monastery.
    Church and museum are worth to visit. Church has many excellent frescos with scenes from the Holy Bible and Gospels. Among the painters worked here were famous Antonio Campi, Bernardino Luini and his son Aurelio and Simone Peterzano. Just have a look at that beauty and be convinced that church is the must see place in Milan.

    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed. Admission to church is free.

    Working hours:
    09:30-17:30 from Tuesday through Saturday

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

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    San Pietro in Gessate, High Altar.

    by Oleg_D. Updated Mar 2, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    There is the statue of Virgin Mary and many vow gifts in the altar. Ambrogio Bergognone (Burgundian) also known as Ambrogio di Stephano da Fossano painted the fresco showing the scene of the Funeral of Saint Martin in 1514. There was too dark but anyway there are a lot of fabulous frescos and that church is worth to visit and spend there one hour.

    Working hours
    From September 15 to May 30 :
    07:30 to 18:00 and 8:30 to 12:00 on the days before holidays,
    Then from 16:30 to 20:00.
    Sunday and holidays: 8:30 to 1:00 p.m., 4:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

    From July 1 to September 14:
    08:00 to 12:00 and from 08:30 to 12:00 on the days before holidays,
    Then from 17:00 to 20:00.
    On Sundays and holidays: 08:30 to 12:00 and 17:00 to 20:00

    Admission is free. Noncommercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed. Donations are highly welcomed!

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

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    San Pietro in Gessate, Interior.

    by Oleg_D. Updated Mar 2, 2013

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    San Pietro in Gessate is the home to a series of paintings of the Lombard Renaissance. Artists who worked here include Giovanni Donato Montorfano, Bernardino Butinone and Bernardo Zenale. In the early 16th century Vincenzo Foppa completed for this church his famous Deposition, which later acquired by the Museum of Berlin and lost during World War II.
    All interesting frescos of XV century are in the chapels on your left hand side along the Western wall of the church and in transept. Frescos in the chapels on your left hand side were painted mostly in XVII century.

    Working hours
    From September 15 to May 30 :
    07:30 to 18:00 and 8:30 to 12:00 on the days before holidays,
    Then from 16:30 to 20:00.
    Sunday and holidays: 8:30 to 1:00 p.m., 4:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

    From July 1 to September 14:
    08:00 to 12:00 and from 08:30 to 12:00 on the days before holidays,
    Then from 17:00 to 20:00.
    On Sundays and holidays: 08:30 to 12:00 and 17:00 to 20:00

    Admission free. Noncommercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed. Donations are highly welcomed!

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    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

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    San Pietro in Gessate, Grifi Chapel.

    by Oleg_D. Updated Mar 2, 2013

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    Bernardo Zenale painted the impressive frescoes with the Histories of Saint Ambrose in the Grifi Chapel. The Grifi chapel has a notable tombstone with statue of Ambrogio Grifi the donator of this church made by Benedetto Briosco. This is the very typical for XV century red marble stone effigy.

    Working hours
    From September 15 to May 30 :
    07:30 to 18:00 and 8:30 to 12:00 on the days before holidays,
    Then from 16:30 to 20:00.
    Sunday and holidays: 8:30 to 1:00 p.m., 4:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

    From July 1 to September 14:
    08:00 to 12:00 and from 08:30 to 12:00 on the days before holidays,
    Then from 17:00 to 20:00.
    On Sundays and holidays: 08:30 to 12:00 and 17:00 to 20:00

    Admission free. Noncommercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed. Donations are highly welcomed!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

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    San Pietro in Gessate

    by Oleg_D. Updated Mar 2, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    The Church of Saint Peter in Gessate is in the city of Milan, Lombardy, Northern Italy. That church was built in the XVth century. It is a noteworthy example of typical Italian single nave and two aisles church architecture.
    The architect was either Guiniforte Solari or his son Pietro Antonio Solari. The church has a nave and two aisles, with square-plan, groin vaulted spans, flanked by two rows of chapels.

    Working hours
    From September 15 to May 30 :
    07:30 to 18:00 and 8:30 to 12:00 on the days before holidays,
    Then from 16:30 to 20:00.
    Sunday and holidays: 8:30 to 1:00 p.m., 4:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

    From July 1 to September 14:
    08:00 to 12:00 and from 08:30 to 12:00 on the days before holidays,
    Then from 17:00 to 20:00.
    On Sundays and holidays: 08:30 to 12:00 and 17:00 to 20:00

    Admission free. Noncommercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed. Donations are highly welcomed!

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    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

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    Chiesa di San Gottardo in Corte

    by Oleg_D. Updated Feb 19, 2013

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    Church of Saint Gothard in Court.
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    Church of Saint Gothard in Court.
    Church San Gottardo in Corte or San Gottardo a Palazzo was built as the Ducal Chapel by Azzone Visconti by 1336. It was originally dedicated to the Blessed Virgin but Azzone who suffered from the gout later changed the dedication to St. Gothard of Hildesheim the patron saint of all gout sufferers. Interior of the church has been renovated, or destroyed speaking honestly, in neoclassical style. That’s why today you can see typical XVIII century interior instead of high gothic one inside that church. Nonetheless that’s church is worth to be visited and put to so-called “must see” list. Why? The reason is the fresco with the scene of Crucifixion painted by Giottesque I mean either immortal Giotto di Bondone or somebody of his pupils and followers. Unfortunately that fresco is faded but even its remains showing it was the masterpiece.
    And one more reason to visit this church is the tomb of Azzone Visconti. I’m going to describe it in the next review.
    Service hours:
    Monday to Friday 08h00 - 18h30
    Saturday 09h30 - 12h30 / 14h30 - 19h30
    Sun 08.30 - 13.30
    Free admission. Donations are welcomed!
    Visitors are allowed to take the non commercial photo without flash light and tripod but please be polite and don’t disturb priests and flock during the service.

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    Chiesa di San Gottardo in Corte, Part II.

    by Oleg_D. Written Feb 19, 2013

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    Don't turn around here.
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    Well, when you enter to the Church of San Gottardo in Corte you just see the high altar and that’s it. Everything is looking like in the first picture I attached here. Usually people just turn around, make some pictures of the fresco with Crucifixion and go out. That’s the mistake! To see the masterpiece of medieval stone carving you must come up to the high altar barrier. The view on the Azzone Visconti tomb will be your just reward!
    Azzone Visconti’s tomb was sculpted by Giovanni di Balduccio. The relief on the tomb shows Emperor of Holly Roman Empire Ludwig of Bavaria investing Azzone Visconti with the crown as imperial vicar of Milan. The monument was dismantled during the neoclassical reconstruction of the church and rebuilt in modern times in the way we can see it now. In fact Azzone bought the title of Imperial Vicar of Milan in 1329 for 60 000 florins from the Emperor Ludwig IV in opposition to the Pope, who nominally held the right of the nomination. Azzone paid only 12,000 of the promised florins, the feeble Ludwig being unable to force the payment. Anyway Emperor was in urgent need to put some prominent Ghibelline to rule over Milan and defend it from the Guelphs and Pope. That’s why on March 15, 1330 Azzone was appointed perpetual lord of Milan, actually the first Great Duke of Milan. He died in 1339 of a gout attack, and was buried in the church here. So, Azzone left after him excellent source of information on the fashion, arms and armor of his time! Thanks him and Balduccio!
    Service hours:
    Monday to Friday 08h00 - 18h30
    Saturday 09h30 - 12h30 and 14h30 - 19h30
    Sun 08.30 - 13.30
    Admission free. Donations are welcomed!
    Visitors are allowed to take the non commercial photos without flash light and tripod but please be polite and don’t disturb priests and flock during the service.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

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    San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore

    by ettiewyn Updated Sep 15, 2012

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    When we walked along Corso Magenta, we also visited San Maurizio alla Monastero Maggiore, basically just because it was there. We had read that there was a church in this street, but we did not expect too much. From the outside, it did not look too exciting.
    But then we entered and ... wow!!!
    The interior was simply breathtaking. All of the interior is painted, every single bit. There are many, many rectangular pictures as well as some that are rounded off, and even every single arch, pillar and frieze is painted. Even all the wooden parts of the organ are!!!

    The church was built in the 16th century, and the paintings were created at that time, too. Before the erection of this church, there had already been a convent dating back to the 9th century and before - parts of this are now incorporated into the Archaeological Museum which is just next door.
    Unfortunately, not much is known about why and by whom the church was constructed - neither the name of the patron, nor who the architects and the creators were. The names of the painters who did the earlier paintings are lost. The church was inaugurated around 1515 and it clearly shows the taste of the Lombard aristocracy at that time. There are pictures of many saints, heraldic ribbons, fruits and many different ornaments.
    A few decades later, new paintings were created, and although there is no evidence, it is believed that the patron was Alessandro Bentivoglio, the prince of Bologna, who married a noblewoman of the Sforza family from Milan. The new pictures depict the couple and other members of their families in different scenes.
    The convent was suppressed in 1798, and together with the fact that the church is located in a very humid part of Milan, this threatened the paintings immensely. A lot of restoration work was done over time, recently in 1964 and 1986.

    This church, where every single spot is covered in bright paint, is simply amazing, and we spent so much time here looking at all the paintings. The fantastic thing is that the room you see when you first enter is only one room of the church - when there was still a convent located here, this was the place where people went to mass, the public sanctuary. A small door leads you to another room which is even bigger, and which was where the nuns attended mass, the convent hall. The two rooms have a similar style, but still a different atmosphere. And of course the walls in-between provide yet more space for paintings, ornaments and wonderful depictions!

    Picture 1 & 2: The public sanctuary
    Picture 3 & 4: The convent hall
    Picture 5: The church from outside. How plain it looks - who could guess that there are such treasures inside?

    As I really wanted to show more of this gem, I have created two travelogues. The first shows several pictures I particularly liked. The second shows some of the things I found unusual - ornaments and special pictures.

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    • Arts and Culture
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