Chiese - Churches, Milan

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  • Chiese - Churches
    by Oleg_D.
  • Chiese - Churches
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    Mocking of Christ
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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    San Marco - interior

    by leffe3 Written Aug 5, 2011
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    The sheer size of San Marco becomes much more apparent when you walk through the main doors with its single nave and two aisles. The main part of the church highlights the Baroque rebuild and renovations of the 17th century.

    The side chapels on either side of the nave are full of frescoes and statues, with many 'newer' frescoes having been painted over the original 14th century work.

    At the rear of the church, the right transept is the 'mainstay' of the earlier church, with stunning sarcophagi along with early 16th century frescoes.

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    San Marco

    by leffe3 Written Aug 5, 2011
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    Literally just round the corner from the Pinacoteca di Brera, the 13th century San Marco was built by Augustinian monks. Heavily modified during the 17th century (although retaining much of the original, hence its hotchpotch appearance), it became the largest church in the city after the Duomo.

    San Marco has a long history of importance to Milan: Verdi's Requiem was premiered at the church in 1874 on the first anniversary of the death of Milanese poet Alessandro Manzoni. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart stayed at the monastery as a young man in 1770.

    The facade is somewhat newer than the rest of the church, added in 1871, with the lunette above the main door of the Madonna and saints a copy of the original by Angelo Inganni.

    The campanile (tower) dates from the 14th century but was renovated in the 1880s.

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    San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore

    by leics Written Mar 6, 2011

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    Noahs' Ark (Luini)
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    This church was originally part of the Benedictine monastery, the other buildings of which are now used as Milan's Museum of Archaeology.

    Dating from 1503, the church is divided in two by a partition which allowed the nuns to follow the service and receive Communion without mixing with the general public on the other side.

    It's a jewel of a place. Almost every inch of its walls and ceilinghas been painted, with side chapels and alcoves containing colourful scenes of religious stories. The fresco cycle which covers the walls dates from the 1600s and includes works by Bernadino Luini, more of which can be seen on the partition.

    I particularly like the illustration of Noah's Ark I found on the nuns' side, painted by Luini.

    Well worth visiting.

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    Santa Maria Presso di San Satiro

    by penny_g Updated Feb 19, 2011

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    First built in 876, the church was dedicated to St. Satyrus, brother of St. Ambrose. Later the church was called to St. Mary, so nowadays its name is after both of them - Santa Maria Presso di San Satiro.

    The church was very important in the 13th and 14th centuries, after news spread through Christendom that an image of the Madonna here shed real blood when stabbed.

    San Satiro was later perfected by Bramante, demonstrating his command of proportion and perspective, keynotes of Renaissance architecture.

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    San Fedele

    by penny_g Written Feb 17, 2011

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    One of Tibaldi’s most famous designs, San Fedele in Milan, built for the Jesuits, combined a creative interior spatial enclosure with a strong expression of the architectural Orders.

    Named after the old church entrusted in 1567 by Cardinal Carlo Borromeo to the Society of Jesus, the San Fedele now houses a variety of activities. The place is an inspiration for some young Jesuits.

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    San Carlo al Corso

    by penny_g Written Feb 17, 2011

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    San Carlo al Corso is a neo-classic church in the center of Milan. It was built to replace the medieval church of Santa Maria dei Servi. The construction and the design themselves were inspired by the Pantheon of Rome.

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    Church of San Maurizio

    by Rixie Updated Nov 14, 2010

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    Artwork, Church of St. Maurizio
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    We wandered into the Church of San Maurizio by mistake - we were looking for the Archeological Museum next door, and they seem to share a common address.

    The church is also known as the Monastero Maggiore and houses frescoes by 16th century artist Bernadino Luini. I thought the colors in this one were so beautiful.

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    Chiesa di Santa Maria in San Satiro

    by Diana75 Updated Jun 7, 2006

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    Chiesa di Santa Maria in San Satiro
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    Santa Maria in San Satiro or just simply San Satiro is another monument in Milan marked by the concepts of the great architect Donato Bramante.

    Bramante was commissioned in 1478 to rebuild and enlarge the church and used a single aisle, T-shaped plan.

    Due to Bramante fabulous work the interior has the appearance of a Greek cross, but the presbytery is actually only an optical illusion.

    The church is addiacent to Piazza del Duomo with the entrance in Via Torino.

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    Chiesa di San Sebastiano

    by Diana75 Updated Jun 7, 2006

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    Chiesa di San Sebastiano inside
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    The round form of the church has its origin in the early destination as civic votiv temple for stopping the plague.

    The church was commissioned by San Carlo Borromeo in 1576 and subsequently restored many times.

    The windows belong to the painter Piero Marussig (1879-1937).

    The church of San Sebastiano is located in Via Torino, on the way to Porta Ticinese.

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    Chiesa di San Giuseppe

    by Diana75 Updated Jun 7, 2006

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    Chiesa di San Giuseppe
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    On via Giuseppe Verdi, on the way from Teatro alla Scala to Pinacoteca di Brera, there is the beautiful church of San Giuseppe.

    With its elegant baroque facade San Giuseppe is one of the finest architectural achievements of Francesco Maria Richini (1630).

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    San Vittore al Corpo

    by Diana75 Updated Jun 6, 2006

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    The facade of San Vittore al Corpo
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    Built in the 8th century and rebuilt starting with 1560, San Vittore al Corpo it is said to be one of the most beautiful churches in Milan due to its spectacular decoration.

    Erected on the site of a mausoleum for the emperor Valentiniano II, the romanic style church was intended to shelter the remains of the saint.

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    Chiesa di San Carlo

    by Diana75 Updated May 30, 2006

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    San Carlo al Corso on Corso Vittorio Emanuele

    Named also San Carlo al Corso, this classical church was buit between 1832 and 1847 by Amati.

    Its wonderful cupola was made by Felice Pezzagalli in1844 and is put directly on the high timpan without reinforcements.

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