Church Santa Maria Delle Grazie, Milan

4.5 out of 5 stars 25 Reviews

Corso Magenta 02 467 6111

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  • Church Santa Maria Delle Grazie
    by ettiewyn
  • Santa Maria Delle Grazie
    Santa Maria Delle Grazie
    by IreneMcKay
  • Santa Maria Delle Grazie
    Santa Maria Delle Grazie
    by IreneMcKay
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    Santa Maria Delle Grazie

    by IreneMcKay Written Jan 8, 2014

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    Santa Maria delle Grazie is mainly famous for Leonardo da Vinci's 'Last Supper' which is housed in the adjoining refectory.

    The Dominican Order commissioned Guiniforte Solari to build this church for their monastery. The church was finally completed in 1490. In 1943 allied bombings damaged the church, but it was restored in 1947.

    To see the Last Supper you must book in advance. We did not. We just admired the beautiful church from outside. There is a lovely view from the rear courtyard.

    Santa Maria Delle Grazie Santa Maria Delle Grazie Santa Maria Delle Grazie Santa Maria Delle Grazie
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    Some interesting details.

    by Oleg_D. Updated Nov 9, 2013

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    The history of the Dominican Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie starts in 1463 when Francesco Sforza the famous Italian Condotier and Grand Duke of Milan endowed the parcel of land to Dominican Friars. Others sources say that donated land belonged to Count Gasparo Vimercati who was the commander of city militia of Milan. Dominicans hired Giunforte Solari who started to build the Convent. The New Grand Duke of Milan Ludovico il Moro Sforza commissioned Donato Bramante to enlarge the church. Bramante rebuilt church and added large semi circular apses, built new dome tower, cloisters and refectory. The church is famous because its refectory houses the Leonardo da Vinci mural “The last supper”.
    You can see another interesting triptych icon in the first chapel on your left hand side. There are Virgin Mary with baby Jesus, Saint John the Baptist and Saint Peter the Martyr also known as Peter of Verona in the icon. Peter Martyr was born in the family of Cathar heretics but was converted to Catholicism because the sermon of Saint Dominique. Peter joined the Order of Brothers the Preachers and became Dominican Monk and Inquisitor of Lombardy. He was killed by the assassins hired by Milanese Cathars. There are a lot of icons with Black Friars (Dominicans) who were killed and became martyrs. We should remember that they controlled the Inquisition and were Inquisitors. That profession, I mean the trade of Inquisitor, was very unpopular and dangerous.
    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod inside the church is allowed but strictly prohibited in refectory.

    Open from Monday through Friday:
    From 07:00 – 12:00 hrs.
    And 15:00 – 17:00 hrs.
    Saturday and Sunday:
    From: 07:15 – 12:15 hrs.
    And 15:30 – 21:00 hrs.
    Opening hours of the Sagrestia Bramantesca are:
    Monday: 09:30 – 13:00 and 14:00 – 18:00 hrs.
    From Tuesday through Sunday:
    08:30 – 19:00 hrs.

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    Santa Maria Delle Grazie‎. Altar&Choirs.

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 30, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The history of the Dominican Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie starts in 1463 when Francesco Sforza the famous Italian Condotier and Grand Duke of Milan endowed the parcel of land to Dominican Friars. Others sources say that donated land belonged to Count Gasparo Vimercati who was the commander of city militia of Milan. Dominicans hired Giunforte Solari who started to build the Convent. The New Grand Duke of Milan Ludovico il Moro Sforza commissioned Donato Bramante to enlarge the church. Bramante rebuilt church and added large semi circular apses, built new dome tower, cloisters and refectory. The church is famous because its refectory houses the Leonardo da Vinci mural “The last supper”.
    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod inside the church is allowed but strictly prohibited in refectory.
    Open from Monday through Friday:
    From 07:00 – 12:00 hrs.
    And 15:00 – 17:00 hrs.
    Saturday and Sunday:
    From: 07:15 – 12:15 hrs.
    And 15:30 – 21:00 hrs.
    Opening hours of the Sagrestia Bramantesca are:
    Monday: 09:30 – 13:00 and 14:00 – 18:00 hrs.
    From Tuesday through Sunday:
    08:30 – 19:00 hrs.

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    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Delle Grazie‎. Iteriors.

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 30, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The history of the Dominican Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie starts in 1463 when Francesco Sforza the famous Italian Condotier and Grand Duke of Milan endowed the parcel of land to Dominican Friars. Others sources say that donated land belonged to Count Gasparo Vimercati who was the commander of city militia of Milan. Dominicans hired Giunforte Solari who started to build the Convent. The New Grand Duke of Milan Ludovico il Moro Sforza commissioned Donato Bramante to enlarge the church. Bramante rebuilt church and added large semi circular apses, built new dome tower, cloisters and refectory. The church is famous because its refectory houses the Leonardo da Vinci mural “The last supper”.
    Interiors of the church are beautiful although we should remember that almost all ceiling painting are not original because they the destroyed during WW II by allied air bomb. Thank the painters who restored it for us.
    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod inside the church is allowed but strictly prohibited in refectory.

    Open from Monday through Friday:
    From 07:00 – 12:00 hrs.
    And 15:00 – 17:00 hrs.
    Saturday and Sunday:
    From: 07:15 – 12:15 hrs.
    And 15:30 – 21:00 hrs.
    Opening hours of the Sagrestia Bramantesca are:
    Monday: 09:30 – 13:00 and 14:00 – 18:00 hrs.
    From Tuesday through Sunday:
    08:30 – 19:00 hrs.

    Piazza Santa Maria delle Grazie, 2
    20123, Milano
    +39 02 467 6111

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Delle Grazie‎

    by Oleg_D. Updated Apr 29, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The history of the Dominican Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie starts in 1463 when Francesco Sforza the famous Italian Condotier and Grand Duke of Milan endowed the parcel of land to Dominican Friars. Others sources say that donated land belonged to Count Gasparo Vimercati who was the commander of city militia of Milan. Dominicans hired Giunforte Solari who started to build the Convent. The New Grand Duke of Milan Ludovico il Moro Sforza commissioned Donato Bramante to enlarge the church. Bramante rebuilt church and added large semi circular apses, built new dome tower, cloisters and refectory. The church is famous because its refectory houses the Leonardo da Vinci mural “The last supper”.
    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod inside the church is allowed but strictly prohibited in refectory.
    Open from Monday through Friday:
    From 07:00 – 12:00 hrs.
    And 15:00 – 17:00 hrs.
    Saturday and Sunday:
    From: 07:15 – 12:15 hrs.
    And 15:30 – 21:00 hrs.
    Opening hours of the Sagrestia Bramantesca are:
    Monday: 09:30 – 13:00 and 14:00 – 18:00 hrs.
    From Tuesday through Sunday:
    08:30 – 19:00 hrs.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

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  • ettiewyn's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria delle Grazie - inner courtyard

    by ettiewyn Written Sep 8, 2012

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    After you have explored the beautiful interior of the church, please take your time and discover another gem of this building - the inner courtyard. You can enter this courtyard either from Corso Magenta, or from the church, there is a small door leading to it close to the apse.

    The courtyard is a beautiful and very tranquil place, and we spent some time just sitting here in the shade and relaxing, enjoying the cool and quiet, and the spiritual atmosphere. It is a very green place, and you also have a great view of the church's high apse.

    There were also posters pointing out a Leonardo da Vinci exhibition in another part of the building, but we did not visit it because we already had seen the one in the Pinacoteca Ambrosiana.

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  • ettiewyn's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria delle Grazie

    by ettiewyn Updated Sep 8, 2012

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    Many people visit Santa Maria delle Grazie just to see the "Last Supper", but the church itself is absolutely worth a visit! And it is not at all connected to the painting these days - the painting is not owned by the church, and the church does not get any of the entrance fees paid by visitors who go and see the painting.
    After we had visited the painting ourselves and had had a little break on the square in front of the church, we went inside it - and it took our breath away. It was just so beautiful! Probably part of this is due to the fact that this was the first time that I saw a church of this style, so different to what I had seen before. But even so, I think it must amaze everyone who loves architecture and the arts.

    The church was built from 1463 to 1490, but the interior was changed many times during the course of time. The exterior looked quite unusual to me, mainly because of the bricks used - I think it is amazing that the building looks so beautiful and elegant despite of the use of this rough material.
    Inside, the nave largely has the original design, with beautiful frecoes and gothic arches. I thought that the light was just right inside, and the patterns painted on the ceiling and the arches were so wonderful. I had never seen a church like this before, and I loved it so much!

    Picture 2 shows the façade which looks quite plain, but has an interesting fresco above the door, showing the Virgin Mary freeing Milan from the plague (Madonna delle Grazie libera Milano dalla peste). It was painted by Giovanni Battista Crespi in 1631. You can see the door in picture 3.

    Five pictures are simply not enough for such a building, therefore I also have created a travelogue :-)

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria delle Grazie - the Tribune by Bramante

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 13, 2011

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    The church was just about ready when the new ruler of Milan, Lodovico il Moro, ordered it enlarged. Both presbytery and apse were torn down so that Donato Bramante could put his own design for the huge apse. It was begun in March 1492 and when it was completed in 1497 Lodovico had his wife, Beatrice d'Este, buried there. Bramante's great tribune was a lesson in Renaissance architecture to the artists of Lombardy, even though his idea of three apses radiating from a square is actually based on an older building, the Parma Cathedral. From the outside the tribune looks like a giant wheel resting upon a cube.
    Right now, July 2003, the Tribune is in the reconstruction.

    the Tribune of Santa Maria delle Grazie
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    Santa Maria delle Grazie

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 13, 2011

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    In 1463, a captain in Francesco Sforza's army, Gaspare Vimercati, donated a plot of land to the Domenican order. On the site was a chapel adorned with a fresco of the Virgin, the so-called Madonna delle Grazie. The monks commissioned Guiniforte Solari to build a church and monastery on the plot, and ground was broken on September 10, 1463. The church that Solari built between 1466 and 1490 is a typical example of the transition stage between Gothic and Renaissance, as can be seen in the Lombard style gabled facade decorated with pilaster strips and pierced by a single opening below and several niches above. Only the gabled portal belongs to the period when the Renaissance architect Bramante was involved in the work.
    Leonardo's "Last Supper"
    Leonardo da Vinci spent eighteen years in Milano, at the court of Ludovico il Moro. He started work on the fresco in 1496 when he recived a commission from Ludovico who, after having enlarged the church of Santa Maria delle Grazie, decided to enlarge and decorate the Refectory (Dining Hall) of the adjacent Dominican monastery.
    Do not miss to see it when visiting this church!

    Santa Maria delle Grazie Santa Maria delle Grazie Dominican Monastery
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  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria delle Grazie

    by MalenaN Written Mar 14, 2009

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    Santa Maria delle Grazie is the church where you can see Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper, but there is a separate entrance and an admission to see the painting (see another tip). After I had bought the ticket for The Last Supper I had 20 minutes to explore the church before it was time for me to see the painting.

    Santa Maria delle Grazie is a beautiful church where I liked the light colours, the vaults with frescos, the granite columns and much more. Construction of the church begun in 1463 and it was completed in 1482. It is made by Guiniforte Solari and it is built in a Lombard gothic style. The façade is made of red brick. Inside there are three aisles and it is 63 metres long and 30 metres wide and there are several chapels. There are work of art made by Butinone, Montorfano, Demìo, the Cazzaniga brothers, Zenale and Bergognone.

    The church is open between 7.30 - 12.00 and 15.00 - 19.00.

    Santa Maria delle Grazie Santa Maria delle Grazie Santa Maria delle Grazie Santa Maria delle Grazie Santa Maria delle Grazie
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    Santa Maria de Gracia

    by lina112 Written Aug 2, 2008

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    The Church and Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie were built between 1465 and 1482 to designs by Guiniforte Solari. The church's original architectonic layout, now only visible in the form of the nave and aisles, was a typical example of Late Gothic Lombard art of which Solari was a well-known exponent. If you want to visit the famous Da Vinci last supper, you have to book in very advance by internet or by phone.

    Es la iglesia mas visitada de milan ya que se encuentra la famosa última cena de Leonardo Da Vinci, pero si quieres ver la susodicha última cena hay que reservarlo por telefono o por internet con bastante antelación, porque solo dejan entrar a grupos de 25 personas cada media hora creo. Dicha pintura no se encuentra en la misma iglesia sino en una sala anexa a la iglesia la cual tiene otra entrada para acceder.

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    Santa Maria delle Grazie - outside

    by Diana75 Updated Jun 9, 2007

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    The church of Santa Maria delle Grazie was built on the place of a small chapel adorned with a fresco of the Virgin and called Madonna delle Grazie.

    Built on a plot of land donated by Gaspare Vimercati to the Dominican order, the church is a typical example of the transition stage between Gothic and Renaissance, with simple elegant Tuscan architectural forms and colourful Lombard decorative motifs.

    By the time of the new ruler of Milan, Ludovico il Moro, the presbytery and the apse were modified with the help of Donato Bramante.

    Bramante's great tribune, looking like a giant wheel resting upon a cube from outside, is a lesson in Renaissance architecture.

    The wonderful combination of volumes and lines and the high quality of decoration make from Santa Maria delle Grazie a masterpiece of renaissance architecture in Europe.

    Unfortunately Santa Maria delle Grazie was another attraction of Milan that was going through an extensice restoration works, thus the most important part of it was covered.

    Santa Maria delle Grazie - April 2007 Santa Maria delle Grazie - May 2006 Santa Maria delle Grazie - May 2006 Santa Maria delle Grazie - May 2006 Santa Maria delle Grazie - May 2006
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    Santa Maria delle Grazie – inside

    by Diana75 Updated Jun 9, 2007

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    Inside the church maintains some elements for the original layout, visible in the form of the nave and aisles.

    Ludovico Sforza wanted to make the church his family mausoleum thus he orders some modifications, such as building a new apse to replace Solari's presbytery or the replacement of the facade and part of the nave and aisles. But due to the fall of the Sforza regime in 1499 work have beeb interrupted and never finished.

    More over the bombing on August 16, 1943 destroyed the library and the cloister of the dead.

    Santa Maria delle Grazie ��� inside Santa Maria delle Grazie ��� inside Santa Maria delle Grazie ��� inside Santa Maria delle Grazie ��� inside Santa Maria delle Grazie ��� inside
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    Santa Maria delle Grazie – Bramante's tribune

    by Diana75 Written Apr 9, 2007

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    Bramante's great tribune, looking like a giant wheel resting upon a cube from outside, is a lesson in Renaissance architecture.

    The wonderful combination of volumes and lines and the high quality of decoration make from Santa Maria delle Grazie a masterpiece of renaissance architecture in Europe.

    Santa Maria delle Grazie ��� Bramante's tribune Santa Maria delle Grazie ��� Bramante's tribune Santa Maria delle Grazie ��� Bramante's tribune Santa Maria delle Grazie ��� Bramante's tribune
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    SANTA MARIA DELLE GRAZIE

    by Maggies Written Nov 5, 2006

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    This gothic church is world famous thanks to Last Supper painted in 1494 - 1498 in the reflectory adjoining the church. Leonardo da Vinci was commissioned to paint this great work of art by Ludovico il Moro, a parton of Leonardo and other famous arists who made Milan one of Italy's great centres of art and culture.
    The church was built in the 2nd half of 15th century by Guiniforte Solari and then rebuilt few times, however Solari's wide brick facade can still be admired.

    Make sure you check the opening hours before coming to see the Last Supper. Unfortunatelly it was closed when I came here.

    Santa Maria delle Gracie The facade of Santa Maria delle Grazie
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