Duomo - Cathedral, Milan

4.5 out of 5 stars 195 Reviews

Piazza del Duomo 02 7202 2656

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  • Duomo - Cathedral
    by Gypsystravels
  • Milan Cathedral.
    Milan Cathedral.
    by IreneMcKay
  • Milan Cathedral.
    Milan Cathedral.
    by IreneMcKay
  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Views from the roof.

    by Oleg_D. Written Mar 5, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you buy the ticket then you will be able to get up on the roof of Cathedral Terraces. Views from the roof of Duomo are stunning. Just have a look at the pictures. When you are on the roof the first your impression is as if you get in the forest of spires. That magnificent masterpiece is worth the money you spent for your visit.
    Opening times of Cathedral itself: daily 7.00 – 19.00. Last entry 18.45

    Prices:
    Admission to Cathedral itself is free.
    Combined tickets:
    Combined A €15.00
    Terraces by lift, Museum and Treasury, Baptistery of San Giovanni alle Fonti
    Combined B €11.00
    Terraces on foot, Museum and Treasury, Baptistery of San Giovanni alle Fonti

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Walking on the roof.

    by Oleg_D. Written Mar 5, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you buy the ticket then you will be able to get up on the roof of Cathedral Terraces. When you are on the roof the first your impression is as if you get in the forest of spires. That magnificent masterpiece is worth the money you spent for your visit.
    Opening times of Cathedral itself: daily 7.00 – 19.00. Last entry 18.45

    Prices:
    Admission to Cathedral itself is free.
    Combined tickets:
    Combined A €15.00
    Terraces by lift, Museum and Treasury, Baptistery of San Giovanni alle Fonti
    Combined B €11.00
    Terraces on foot, Museum and Treasury, Baptistery of San Giovanni alle Fonti

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    • Architecture

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Duomo by night

    by Oleg_D. Written Mar 4, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    My wife said “This is the most beautiful and fascinated Cathedral among all Great Medieval Cathedrals of Europe!” And I should tell that I agree. The only important thing you should always remember is that majority of statues and decorations of exterior were made in XIX and XX centuries when building technologies and material made possible the construction of such architectural masterpieces. Another important thing is that the Cathedral is even better looking by the night.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos and videos without flashlight and tripod but only if they bought additional photo permission. It cost two Euros and you can by it at the audio guide desk which is situated on the left hand side from the main entrance in the cathedral.

    Opening times of Cathedral itself: daily 7.00 – 19.00. Last entry 18.45

    Prices: admission to Cathedral is free.
    Combined tickets:
    Combined A €15.00
    Terraces by lift, Museum and Treasury, Baptistery of San Giovanni alle Fonti
    Combined B €11.00
    Terraces on foot, Museum and Treasury, Baptistery of San Giovanni alle Fonti

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Duomo

    by Oleg_D. Written Mar 4, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I’m not going to rehearse the history of the Cathedral of Santa Maria Nascente also know as Duomo because everybody knows that Archbishop Antonio da Saluzzo started its construction in 1386. Cathedral was finished only in XX century, at last and since then it is on endless repairs and renovations. How can I describe it? I can just repeat the words of my wife “This is the most beautiful and fascinated Cathedral among all Great Medieval Cathedrals of Europe!” And I should tell that I agree. The only important thing you should always remember is that majority of statues and decorations of exterior were made in XIX and XX centuries when building technologies and material made possible the construction of such architectural masterpieces. If it is not enough anybody can find the heaps of information on that Cathedral in internet.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos and videos without flashlight and tripod but only if they bought additional photo permission. It cost two Euros and you can by it at the audio guide desk which is situated on the left hand side from the main entrance in the cathedral.

    Opening times of Cathedral itself: daily 7.00 – 19.00. Last entry 18.45

    Prices: admission to Cathedral is free.
    Combined tickets:
    Combined A €15.00
    Terraces by lift, Museum and Treasury, Baptistery of San Giovanni alle Fonti
    Combined B €11.00
    Terraces on foot, Museum and Treasury, Baptistery of San Giovanni alle Fonti

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    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Interiors of Duomo

    by Oleg_D. Written Mar 3, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We should always remember that the Duomo is one of three biggest medieval Cathedrals in Europe. That’s why it has no three but five naves.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos and videos without flashlight and tripod but only if they bought additional photo permission. It cost two Euros and you can by it at the audio guide desk which is situated on the left hand side from the main entrance in the cathedral.

    Opening times of Cathedral itself: daily 7.00 – 19.00. Last entry 18.45

    Prices: admission to Cathedral is free.
    Combined tickets:
    Combined A €15.00
    Terraces by lift, Museum and Treasury, Baptistery of San Giovanni alle Fonti
    Combined B €11.00
    Terraces on foot, Museum and Treasury, Baptistery of San Giovanni alle Fonti

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    The Southernmost Nave.

    by Oleg_D. Written Mar 3, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Since Milanese Duomo has five naves I use this definition the southernmost nave. What can you see there? First of all, you will be able to observe the tomb with effigies of prominent Milanese merchant Marco Carelli who died in 1394. This is the oldest tomb in cathedral and only one survived till nowadays. You will see the relics of clergymen beatified in XX century. So, you will be a witness of symbolic bridge between the past and present times. And of course if you have a look up then you can enjoy pretty vaults.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos and videos without flashlight and tripod but only if they bought additional photo permission. It cost two Euros and you can by it at the audio guide desk which is situated on the left hand side from the main entrance in the cathedral.

    Opening times of Cathedral itself: daily 7.00 – 19.00. Last entry 18.45

    Prices: admission to Cathedral is free.
    Combined tickets:
    Combined A €15.00
    Terraces by lift, Museum and Treasury, Baptistery of San Giovanni alle Fonti
    Combined B €11.00
    Terraces on foot, Museum and Treasury, Baptistery of San Giovanni alle Fonti

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    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    The high Altar.

    by Oleg_D. Written Mar 2, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    High Altar of Milanese Duomo is one of the hugest in the Europe. It has two huge pulpits situated around the side columns.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos and videos without flashlight and tripod but only if they bought additional photo permission. It cost two Euros and you can by it at the audio guide desk which is situated on the left hand side from the main entrance in the cathedral.
    Opening times of Cathedral itself: daily 7.00 – 19.00. Last entry 18.45

    Prices: admission to Cathedral is free.
    Combined tickets:
    Combined A €15.00
    Terraces by lift, Museum and Treasury, Baptistery of San Giovanni alle Fonti
    Combined B €11.00
    Terraces on foot, Museum and Treasury, Baptistery of San Giovanni alle Fonti

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Ambulatory

    by Oleg_D. Written Mar 2, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    To get in the Ambulatory or the place behind the altar you are required to tale audio-guide/ When we visited the cathedral the rule wash neatly and simple “no audio-guide – no access to ambulatory”. In ambulatory you will be able to observe the stained glass windows, sculptures and some frescos.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos and videos without flashlight and tripod but only if they bought additional photo permission. It cost two Euros and you can by it at the audio guide desk which is situated on the left hand side from the main entrance in the cathedral.

    Opening times of Cathedral itself: daily 7.00 – 19.00. Last entry 18.45

    Prices: admission free.
    Combined tickets:
    Combined A €15.00
    Terraces by lift, Museum and Treasury, Baptistery of San Giovanni alle Fonti
    Combined B €11.00
    Terraces on foot, Museum and Treasury, Baptistery of San Giovanni alle Fonti

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Crypt

    by Oleg_D. Written Mar 2, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    To visit the crypt situated under altar is better to spend fifteen Euros and buy combined ticket. Entrance to the crypt is situated at the southern side of the altar and will see a queue there. What are you going to see there? Well, you shall be able to see the reliquary with some small part of the relics belonged to early Christian Martyrs Saint Gervisius and Saint Protasius. You should remember that the bodies and main relics of these saints are in the Basilica of Sant’ Ambrogio.
    On the other side of the crypt you shall be able to observe the sarcophagus of Saint Charles or Cardinal Carlo Borromeo (1538–1584) who was the Archbishop of Milan in from 1564 through 1584. He was one of main mastermind of Counter-Reformation and left the very bloody footprints after his presence in Switzerland. He was canonized in 1610.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos and videos without flashlight and tripod but only if they bought additional photo permission. It cost two Euros and you can by it at the audio guide desk which is situated on the left hand side from the main entrance in the cathedral.

    Opening times of Cathedral itself: daily 7.00 – 19.00. Last entry 18.45

    Prices: admission free.
    Combined tickets:
    Combined A €15.00
    Terraces by lift, Museum and Treasury, Baptistery of San Giovanni alle Fonti
    Combined B €11.00
    Terraces on foot, Museum and Treasury, Baptistery of San Giovanni alle Fonti

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    Milan Cathedral

    by IreneMcKay Updated Jan 7, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Milan's cathedral (The Duomo) is one of the world's largest churches. It is located in Cathedral Square. Milan Cathedral is positioned in the center of Milan. Construction of the cathedral began in 1386, and continued for hundreds of years until 1813; several finishing touches were not completed until 1965.

    The facade of the cathedral is very beautiful and is covered with wonderful statues and carvings. The cathedral has several beautifully carved doors.

    Inside the cathedral is spacious, but a bit gloomy.

    Access to the roof of the cathedral is from the rear of the building. It costs 12 Euro 50 to go up there. I intended to go, but long queues persuaded me otherwise.

    Milan Cathedral. Milan Cathedral. Milan Cathedral. Milan Cathedral. Milan Cathedral.
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  • Roadquill's Profile Photo

    St Bartholomew Statue in the Duomo

    by Roadquill Written Dec 22, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Located inside the NE portion of the Duomo is the statue of St. Bartholomew, draped in his own skin...Muscles, veins are all exposed. While rather gruesome, it is an amazing statue representing his martydom where he was skinned alive.

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Cathedral Roof Walk

    by antistar Updated Nov 20, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You can even go up onto the cathedral's roof for sensational views of the city, and some nice close up views of the impossible statues on the pinnacles. On rare days, when the sky is clear blue and the smog is not too thick, like the day I went up, you will be lucky enough to see all the way to the Alps (see my main Milan page for pictures of this). Unfortunately, and I don't know if this will change once the work on the front of the cathedral is completed, you can't look over the forward most wall of the cathedral into the Piazzo Duomo below. This is a shame due to the square below being so grand, but you can get a few views of the piazza from the sides of the cathedral.

    There are two ways up the cathedral, one is by walking and the other is by lift. The walk is quite strenuous. I do a lot of walking, and my legs were wobbly by the time I got to the top. It costs €3.50 to walk up a seemingly endless spiral staircase, and you can access these stairs by the long queues on the left hand wall of the cathedral (as you face it). The lift costs €5.00 and can be accessed on the right hand wall of the cathedral (as you face it).

    Roof of the Cathedral, Milan

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Duomo

    by antistar Updated Nov 20, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The construction of this vast Gothic cathedral was started in 1386, and built on a former medieval church of Santa Maria Maggiore. It is one huge mass of marble, containing about 3,500 statues, nearly 100 gargoyles, and far more buttresses, pinnacles, pillars and arches than necessary. The vastness, covering an area of nearly 12,000 square meters, has to be seen to be appreciated. It is third in size, after St. Peter's cathedral in Rome, and the Cathedral of Seville. Its highest pinnacle, at 109 meters, is topped by the golden statue of the Virgin Mary, covered in nearly 4,000 gold leaves. This towers over the cathedral's roof, which you can climb up and admire the views of Milan from, and also wonder at how they ever managed to put all those statues on all those pinnacles without either falling to their deaths, or getting a really bad bout of vertigo.

    You can also go inside the cathedral. Entry is free, but you will have to go through fairly strict security.

    Duomo, Milan

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  • TooTallFinn24's Profile Photo

    Climbing To the Roof of the Milan Duomo

    by TooTallFinn24 Written Jul 4, 2013

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    While the Milan Duomo is a magnificent site to view, climbing it is even more exhilarating.

    First off you have two choices for getting to the roof of the Duomo. Take the elevator for the price of 11 euros which will let you off at the lower of the two viewing points. Or climb the stairs for 7 euros. The climb is not a difficult one and even though the steps can be a tad slippery when it is raining it is by no means a dangerous climb.

    Once you ascend on the roof level there is also little danger. Walking on the roof is easy and there is little chance of falling. Views from the two roof levels are great. It feels amazing to see the detail in the spires. Just a great amount of detail at the roof level.

    TIP: To avoid the long lines for tickets, purchase your ticket across the way at the tobacco shop. You will then be allowed to go to the head of the line saving many minutes of waiting.

    Definitely worth the cost to walk on the roof and see the great detail.

    At the time we went the line opened at 9 am and the last trip up the stairway ceased at 1720. Everyone had to be off the roof by 1800 the day we were therel

    View From the Duomo Roof Duomo Roof Spires Duomo Tower Reconstruction Lookinh Down

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  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Duomo di Milano, Italy

    by TrendsetterME Written Jun 1, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Standing proudly on the piazza del Duomo, the third largest church in Christendom (outdone only by St Peter's in Rome and Seville's cathedral), the Duomo is truly a joy to behold. Although the key elements were in place by 1391, the Duomo took the best part of 500 years to complete - and indeed, building work continues today: a five-year project to clean the facade started in 2002, and the Duomo's full mind-blowing beauty is now there for all to behold.

    The Duomo was begun in brick, but upgraded to marble as its architects understood the grandeur of the project. Over time, it was adorned with Gothic spires and an astonishing wealth of statues, and has been adored by a huge number of art and architecture aficionados. As generations of Lombard builders and architects argued with French and German master stone-cutters about the best way to tackle their mammoth task, an enormous array of styles was employed.

    Construction began in 1386 by order of Bishop Antonio da Saluzzo, on a site that had been associated with places of worship since the third century: a Roman temple to the goddess Minerva once stood here. On the orders of Gian Galeazzo Visconti, then ruler of Milan, Lombardian terracotta stone was eschewed in favour of Condoglian marble shipped from Lake Maggiore on the Ticino river, and then along the Navigli, a network of canals in southern Milan built specially for the purpose.

    Although consecrated in 1418, the cathedral remained incomplete for centuries. Politics, physical setbacks (a pink granite column sank, in transit, in Lake Maggiore), a lack of money and downright indifference kept the project on permanent standby. Finally, early in the 19th century, the façade was put on the church by order of none other than Napoleon; he kick-started the final stages of construction before crowning himself king of Italy here in 1805.

    Duomo di Milano, Italy Duomo di Milano, Italy Duomo di Milano, Italy Duomo di Milano, Italy Duomo di Milano, Italy
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Comments (2)

  • goodfish's Profile Photo
    Feb 23, 2013 at 5:18 AM

    Recent rule change for the Duomo: as of December 10, 2012, all visitors wishing to take photographs or video inside the cathedral must purchase a €2 wristband. This applies to each visitor intending to use a photographic device of any kind - including phones and tablets - and permits images/video for personal, non-publication use only. Different regulations apply for professional photographers. Please see this website for full details:

    duomomilano.it/index.php/vis...

    • goodfish's Profile Photo
      Feb 24, 2013 at 5:27 AM

      In some ways I understand photo bans. Tourists unwilling to follow no-flash rules, who climb on monuments for the best angles, and who monopolize the best pieces to take many, many shots can be very disruptive to other visitors. And the sales of picture books, postcards, etc. can eliminate entry fees or keep them low so that the attraction is affordable to all. I've occasionally quietly snuck a quick (no flash) shot in these places just to have something to illustrate my reviews here but have also purchased a book or dropped coins in the donation box to compensate. The exception would be in specific sites where the taking of photos would be considered blasphemous to the extreme.

    • leics's Profile Photo
      Feb 24, 2013 at 5:36 AM

      I agree. It's really not a matter of being authorities being 'selfish' or 'impolite'. After all, what is on show can be seen in reality by members of the public, or in the hundreds of books and websites which are in the public domain. But it's a sad fact that far, far too many people ignore no-flash, no-commercial-publication rules..and yes, bevahe inappropriately in their desire to get *their* photos. So it is easier to enforce a total ban on photos than to continually have to 'police' throngs of visitors (something which is even more inappropriate in places of worship).

      By the way, saying 'it seems' is just a figure of speech...it does not imply that the statement was not clear.

  • MikeBird's Profile Photo
    Jan 4, 2013 at 7:56 AM

    Enjoyed your reviews of some of the Milan highlights. Just getting myself prepared for my visit there later in January.
    Best wishes,
    Mike

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