San Lorenzo and Sant'Eustorgio, Milan

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  • San Lorenzo and Sant'Eustorgio
    by goodfish
  • San Lorenzo and Sant'Eustorgio
    by goodfish
  • San Lorenzo and Sant'Eustorgio
    by goodfish
  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Basilica San Lorenzo Maggiore

    by Oleg_D. Written Dec 9, 2013

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    In the IV century B.C. San Lorenzo stood outside of the city walls, not far from the amphitheater, the imperial palace and the circus along the way Ticinensis, which joined Pavia to Milan and it was the access road leading to the city.
    For people who arrived to Milan that Basilica was presented as “one of the most impressive buildings of Christian West”.
    Since 1167, when the new walls with the moat were built, the Basilica of San Lorenzo, was incorporated into the circle of the city walls near the Porta Ticinese, the arrival point of the road from Pavia, one of the most important among those that led into town.
    In 1548 the Governor Ferrante Gonzaga built a new defensive walls and Basilica of San Lorenzo then found itself in a densely populated area. Basilica has been reconstructed many times during it one thousand and seven hundred years history. When you look at the apse you can unmistakably date any part of the church.
    Admission is free but any donations are welcomed and highly appreciated. Although is you wish to visit the Chapel of Sant’Aquilino with its late ancient mosaics and frescos of XV-XVI centuries then you are required to buy a ticket. Price of the ticket was 1.50 Euros.

    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flashlight and tripod.
    Open from Monday through Saturday
    from 07.30 to 18.45 hrs.
    Sunday from 09:00 to 19:00

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    San Lorenzo Maggiore.Chapel of Sant’Aquilino

    by Oleg_D. Written Dec 9, 2013

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    In the IV century B.C. San Lorenzo stood outside of the city walls, not far from the amphitheater, the imperial palace and the circus along the way Ticinensis, which joined Pavia to Milan and it was the access road leading to the city.
    For people who arrived to Milan that Basilica was presented as “one of the most impressive buildings of Christian West”.
    Since 1167, when the new walls with the moat were built, the Basilica of San Lorenzo, was incorporated into the circle of the city walls near the Porta Ticinese, the arrival point of the road from Pavia, one of the most important among those that led into town.
    In 1548 the Governor Ferrante Gonzaga built a new defensive walls and Basilica of San Lorenzo then found itself in a densely populated area. Basilica has been reconstructed many times during it one thousand and seven hundred years history. When you look at the apse you can unmistakably date any part of the church.
    Admission is free but any donations are welcomed and highly appreciated. Although is you wish to visit the Chapel of Sant’Aquilino with its late ancient mosaics and frescos of XV-XVI centuries then you are required to buy a ticket. Price of the ticket was 1.50 Euros.

    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flashlight and tripod.
    Open from Monday through Saturday
    from 07.30 to 18.45 hrs.
    Sunday from 09:00 to 19:00

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Religious Travel

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    Basilica San Lorenzo

    by antistar Updated Nov 20, 2013

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Basilica San Lorenzo, Milan

    The foundations of the Basilica San Lorenzo make it possibly the oldest surviving building in Milan. There's little left of the significant Roman presence in the city, which made Milan one of the foremost cities outside Rome at the time, but outside the Basilica is a row of Corinthian columns, the last vestiges of a third century Roman temple. The rest of the buildings that form part of the Basilica were constructed or reconstructed at various times over the last two millennia.

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    Sant’ Eustorgio. The Portinari Chapel

    by Oleg_D. Updated May 9, 2013

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    The Portinari Chapel was built between 1460 and 1468. Building of that chapel was commissioned and financed by Pigello Portinari the representative of Florentine bank of Medici in Milan. It was the very wise decision because the chapel became the mausoleum of Saint Peter the Martyr or Saint Peter of Verona. That man was born in the family of Lombardian Cathar Heretics. The sermon of Dominique Guzman or future Saint Dominique converted Peter to Catholicism and he joined the Black Friars or Order of Dominicans. Since they run the Office of Holy Inquisition, Peter became the Inquisitor General of Northern Italy in 1234. It was very unpopular and sometime dangerous profession that’s why on April 6, 1252 two assassins hired by the Milanese Cathars killed Peter and his companion monk brother Dominic. Next year Pope Innocent IV canonized Peter and Saint Peter the Martyr become protector of inquisitors. That luxurious tomb of Saint Peter the Inquisitor was made by the famous Giovanni Balduccio in 1336. And frescoes were painted by Vincenzo Foppa in second part of XV century. I believe Signor Portinari was the very wise man because it was better to be among the friends of inquisition. Whatever motives and reasons but we have the real masterpiece today.
    To visit that chapel you required to buy a ticket to museum because the chapel is the part of it.
    Tue to Sun: 10.00-18.00
    The ticket office closes at 17.30
    MON: Closed (Except Public Holidays)

    tickets:
    Tuesday: € 4.00
    Full price: € 8.00
    reduced : € 5.00
    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed.

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    The Portinari Chapel. Vincenzo Foppa's Frescos.

    by Oleg_D. Updated May 9, 2013

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    The Portinari Chapel was built between 1460 and 1468. Building of that chapel was commissioned and financed by Pigello Portinari the representative of Florentine bank of Medici in Milan. It was the very wise decision because the chapel became the mausoleum of Saint Peter the Martyr or Saint Peter of Verona. That man was born in the family of Lombardian Cathar Heretics. The sermon of Dominique Guzman or future Saint Dominique converted Peter to Catholicism and he joined the Black Friars or Order of Dominicans. Since they run the Office of Holy Inquisition, Peter became the Inquisitor General of Northern Italy in 1234. It was very unpopular and sometime dangerous profession that’s why on April 6, 1252 two assassins hired by the Milanese Cathars killed Peter and his companion monk brother Dominic. Next year Pope Innocent IV canonized Peter and Saint Peter the Martyr become protector of inquisitors. That luxurious tomb of Saint Peter the Inquisitor was made by the famous Giovanni Balduccio in 1336. And frescoes were painted by Vincenzo Foppa in second part of XV century. I believe Signor Portinari was the very wise man because it was better to be among the friends of inquisition. Whatever motives and reasons but we have the real masterpiece today.
    To visit that chapel you required to buy a ticket to museum.
    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed.
    Tue to Sun: 10.00-18.00
    The ticket office closes at 17.30
    MON: Closed (Except Public Holidays)
    tickets:
    Tuesday: € 4.00
    Full price: € 8.00
    reduced : € 5.00

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    Basilica of Sant’ Eustorgio. Frescos.

    by Oleg_D. Written May 8, 2013

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    Basilica of Sant’ Eustorgio was founded in IV century A.D. and this is one of the oldest churches of Milan. Although it has been reconstructed several times it saved its Romanesque architectural style. Eustorgio the Bishop of Milan brought here the relics of Magi also known as the Three Wise Kings from Constantinople in 344 A. D. Fredrick Barbarossa the Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire of German Nation transferred those relics to Cologne in XII century. Keiser Wilhelm II returned small parts of relics to Basilica of Sant’ Eustorgio in the beginning of XX century. You can see theirs relics on the altar of Southern nave.
    Since 1227 that basilica belonged Black Friars the preacher or just Dominicans and respectively became the HQ of Inquisition Lombardy. Church has three naves. The southern nave with its chapels housing the frescoes and tombs of XIV-XV centuries is more interesting than Northern nave. Majority of tombs of second part of XIV century belong to the members of Visconti Ducal Family. San Eustorgio buried right under the high altar of the church. Some frescos are real “Giotteschi”.

    The real masterpiece is the Portinari Chapel with the tomb of Saint Peter the Martyr and frescoes painted by Vincenzo Foppa. To visit that chapel you required to bay a ticket to museum. Admission to the Church itself is free, although any kind of donations are highly welcomed and appreciated. Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed.

    Time: from Monday through Sunday – 07:45- 18:30 hrs.

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    Basilica of Sant’ Eustorgio. Relics of Magi.

    by Oleg_D. Written May 8, 2013

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    Fresco Adoration of Magi over the Chapel
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    Basilica of Sant’ Eustorgio was founded in IV century A.D. and this is one of the oldest churches of Milan. Although it has been reconstructed several times it saved its Romanesque architectural style. Eustorgio the Bishop of Milan brought here the relics of Magi also known as the Three Wise Kings from Constantinople in 344 A. D. Fredrick Barbarossa the Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire of German Nation transferred those relics to Cologne in XII century. Keiser Wilhelm II returned small parts of relics to Basilica of Sant’ Eustorgio in the beginning of XX century. You can see theirs relics on the altar of Southern nave.
    Since 1227 that basilica belonged Black Friars the preacher or just Dominicans and respectively became the HQ of Inquisition Lombardy. Church has three naves. The southern nave with its chapels housing the frescoes and tombs of XIV-XV centuries is more interesting than Northern nave. Majority of tombs of second part of XIV century belong to the members of Visconti Ducal Family. San Eustorgio buried right under the high altar of the church.

    The real masterpiece is the Portinari Chapel with the tomb of Saint Peter the Martyr and frescoes painted by Vincenzo Foppa. To visit that chapel you required to bay a ticket to museum. Admission to the Church itself is free, although any kind of donations are highly welcomed and appreciated. Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed.

    Time: from Monday through Sunday – 07:45- 18:30 hrs.

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    Basilica of Sant’ Eustorgio. High Altar&Tombs

    by Oleg_D. Written May 8, 2013

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    San Eustorgio buried under the High Altar
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    Basilica of Sant’ Eustorgio was founded in IV century A.D. and this is one of the oldest churches of Milan. Although it has been reconstructed several times it saved its Romanesque architectural style. Eustorgio the Bishop of Milan brought here the relics of Magi also known as the Three Wise Kings from Constantinople in 344 A. D. Fredrick Barbarossa the Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire of German Nation transferred those relics to Cologne in XII century. Keiser Wilhelm II returned small parts of relics to Basilica of Sant’ Eustorgio in the beginning of XX century. You can see theirs relics on the altar of Southern nave.
    Since 1227 that basilica belonged Black Friars the preacher or just Dominicans and respectively became the HQ of Inquisition Lombardy. Church has three naves. The southern nave with its chapels housing the frescoes and tombs of XIV-XV centuries is more interesting than Northern nave. Majority of tombs of second part of XIV century belong to the members of Visconti Ducal Family. San Eustorgio buried right under the high altar of the church.

    The real masterpiece is the Portinari Chapel with the tomb of Saint Peter the Martyr and frescoes painted by Vincenzo Foppa. To visit that chapel you required to bay a ticket to museum. Admission to the Church itself is free, although any kind of donations are highly welcomed and appreciated. Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed.

    Time: from Monday through Sunday – 07:45- 18:30 hrs.

    Related to:
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    • Architecture

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    Basilica of Sant’ Eustorgio. Interior.

    by Oleg_D. Written May 8, 2013

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    4 more images

    Basilica of Sant’ Eustorgio was founded in IV century A.D. and this is one of the oldest churches of Milan. Although it has been reconstructed several times it saved its Romanesque architectural style. Eustorgio the Bishop of Milan brought here the relics of Magi also known as the Three Wise Kings from Constantinople in 344 A. D. Fredrick Barbarossa the Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire of German Nation transferred those relics to Cologne in XII century. Keiser Wilhelm II returned small parts of relics to Basilica of Sant’ Eustorgio in the beginning of XX century. You can see theirs relics on the altar of Southern nave.
    Since 1227 that basilica belonged Black Friars the preacher or just Dominicans and respectively became the HQ of Inquisition Lombardy. Church has three naves. The southern nave with its chapels housing the frescoes and tombs of XIV-XV centuries is more interesting than Northern nave. San Eustorgio buried right under the high altar of the church.

    The real masterpiece is the Portinari Chapel with the tomb of Saint Peter the Martyr and frescoes painted by Vincenzo Foppa. To visit that chapel you required to bay a ticket to museum. Admission to the Church itself is free, although any kind of donations are highly welcomed and appreciated. Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed.

    Time: from Monday through Sunday – 07:45- 18:30 hrs.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Basilica of Sant’ Eustorgio

    by Oleg_D. Written May 8, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    West portal
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    Basilica of Sant’ Eustorgio was founded in IV century A.D. and this is one of the oldest churches of Milan. Although it has been reconstructed several times it saved its Romanesque architectural style. Eustorgio the Bishop of Milan brought here the relics of Magi also known as the Three Wise Kings from Constantinople in 344 A. D. Fredrick Barbarossa the Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire of German Nation transferred those relics to Cologne in XII century. Keiser Wilhelm II returned small parts of relics to Basilica of Sant’ Eustorgio in the beginning of XX century. You can see theirs relics on the altar of Southern nave.

    Since 1227 that basilica belonged Black Friars the preacher or just Dominicans and respectively became the HQ of Inquisition Lombardy. Church has three naves. The southern nave with its chapels housing the frescoes and tombs of XIV-XV centuries is more interesting than Northern nave. San Eustorgio buried right under the high altar of the church.

    The real masterpiece is the Portinari Chapel with the tomb of Saint Peter the Martyr and frescoes painted by Vincenzo Foppa. To visit that chapel you required to bay a ticket to museum. Admission to the Church itself is free, although any kind of donations are highly welcomed and appreciated. Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod is allowed.

    Time: from Monday through Sunday – 07:45- 18:30 hrs.

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    • Religious Travel

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    Basilica San Lorenzo Maggiore

    by goodfish Updated Apr 27, 2013

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    This is a fascinating church with a mystery of a history. It has stood in its spot for around 1,600 years but no one is really sure who built it and for what purpose. Its sheer size and location, said to have been close to an Imperial palace, indicated that it was constructed for more than than purely public, ecclesiastical use. It was also outside of the city walls - where Romans of that period buried their dead - and inclusion of adjoining/freestanding structures of designs associated with funerary purposes point to possible origins as an Imperial mausoleum.

    Who knows?

    What is clear is that even though it was extensively overhauled several times, the main outline of its 4th-century footprint remains. This is an aisled tetraconch church, meaning it's roughly in the shape of a circle with apses that bulged from four sides, and an inner ring of pillars that creates an continuous ambulatory. You can see the original floor plan here:

    http://ciaomilano.it/e/sights/slorenzo.asp

    It was also partially constructed from materials lifted from a Roman amphitheater - a part of which can be seen underneath the church’s foundation. Outside, a colonnade of pillars looted from some long-gone pre-Christian pile mark the front of what was once a roofed, 4-sided portico.

    The interior originally would have been encrusted with fabulous mosaics - long gone due to rebuilding after several fires - but is now mostly bare stone with some scraps of later fresco work here and there including a 16th-century rip-off (and not a good one) of Da Vinci’s “Last supper.” A couple of euros gets you into a 4th-century chapel that was almost certainly meant as a burial chamber and contains a sarcophagus that may or may nor be occupied. Around the walls and niches are fragments of 12th and 14-century frescoes and what little remains of those ancient mosaics which would have brightly illuminated now-darkened spaces. Here also is the crystal reliquary of St. Aquilino, for whom the chapel is named, and a stairway that leads down to a bit of that Roman rubble which lies underneath.

    You can take a little 360-degree tour of the central sanctuary here:

    http://milan.arounder.com/en/city-tour/san-lorenzo-basilica-interior.html

    Entrance (except for the St. Aquilino chapel) is free.
    Monday/Friday/Sat: 7:30 AM - 6:30 PM
    Tues/Wed/Thursday: 7:30 - 12:30 and 2:30 - 6:30 PM
    Sunday: 9:00 AM - 7:00 PM

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  • ettiewyn's Profile Photo

    San Lorenzo alle Colonne

    by ettiewyn Updated Sep 16, 2012

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    San Lorenzo alle Colonne was the last church I visited in the end of a long day of sightseeing. My mom was so tired that she stayed in a café, while I walked here on my own.

    San Lorenzo is one of the oldest churches in Milan, it is believed that it incorporates the original chapel of the Roman Imperial Residence. When it was built in the 4th century, material from the nearby Roman amphitheater was used. Even to me, not knowing so much about architecture, it was obvious that this church is different to other churches I had seen in Milan. The style is not like the Lombard one, but rather Roman, with a central, round room in the middle of the church, and a high cupola. It is rather like a basilica.
    The church was substantially renovated in the 11th, 12th and 16th century, but its main characteristics were never changed.

    I visited quite late in the day, and unfortunately I was not able to see some of the most interesting things this church has to offer: The Capella di Sant' Aquilino has mosaics from the 5th century and as far as I have heard and read, they are just amazing. Unfortunately, the chapel was closed when I came here. In picture 4 you can see the entrance to the chapel, I was able to catch a glimpse of the frescoes when I looked through the door.
    There were some people praying in the church very loudly and absorbed, so I did not walk around a lot and did not take many pictures - I did not want to disturb them. Moreover, there were two dubious men walking around and following me, I am sure they were not tourists and it did feel very strange. When I left the church, they left, too, but they lingered on the steps of the entrance smoking a cigarette and, as I guess, waiting for other tourists? They were not really scary, but I wanted to tell this here as a remainder that pickpockets and other shady characters even occur in churches... Fortunately I had read about this on VT, and so I was not too surprised.

    Although I was on my guard, I enjoyed walking around at least a little. As I said, the architecture was so different to what I had seen so far on my trip to Milan, so it was very interesting. There were also some great frescoes and paintings.

    San Lorenzo definitely is a church I want to visit again when I come back to Milan one day, earlier in the day when the experience will hopefully be better :-)

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    Colonne di San Lorenzo

    by ettiewyn Updated Sep 2, 2012

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    In front of San Lorenzo alle Colonne, there are the very columns that are included in the name of the church. There are sixteen corinthian columns which date back to the 2nd or 3rd century. They were part of a Roman temple about which there is not much known today, and were brought to this place in the 4th century. It might also be that they belonged to a bath and not a temple.

    The long row of columns in the midst of the hustle bustle of the street was an interesting and impressive sight. However, I did not spend a lot of time here because it felt rather uncomfortable, there were several hawkers and other people looking not too friendly, so I only had a quick look, took a few pictures and walked away.

    Close to the columns, in front of the church, there is a statue of Emperor Constantine. It is a copy of an original Roman statue. Constantine was the one who stopped the persecution of Christians within the Roman Empire, in the Edict of Milan in 313A.D.
    Seeing this statue made me realize how big the Roman Empire really was: Only three weeks earlier, I had been standing in front of another statue of Constantine, at York Cathedral - York was where he had been proclaimed Emperor after his father's death. It felt unbelievable to be so far from York now - about 2000km - and yet to be looking at a statue of exactly the same man, connected to the history of both places!

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    Cappella di Sant'Aquilino

    by leffe3 Written Aug 4, 2011

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    Part of the San Lorenzo alle Colonne, this Byzantine chapel dates from the 5th century and has some wonderful mosaics

    Octagonal in shape (more obvious from the outside), it is believed to have been built by Galla Placida, daughter of Emperor Theodosius - originally the chapel was called St Genesius (Chapel of the Queen).

    It was described as a stunningly beautiful church, but over time ('renovations' as well as earthquakes, fires, etc) have reduced the mosaics and frescoes to a fraction of what they once were - 24 scenes of the martyrdom of S. Aquilino.

    Open 7.30am - 12.30pm, 2.30 - 6.45pm: Sunday all day
    Entrance fee: 2 euros

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    San Lorenzo alle Colonne

    by leffe3 Updated Aug 4, 2011

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    One of the oldest churches of western Christendom, dating from the 4th century.

    It's a complete hotch-potch of styles and ages as many fires, collapsing buildings etc have resulted in rebuilds.

    At the front of the church are 16 Roman columns which were moved from an unidentified temple in the 4th century.

    Inside the church, to the right as you go through the main entrance is the Capella di Sant'Aquilino (entrance charge). This Byzantine chapel dates from the 5th century and has some wonderful mosaics (see separate tip).

    The rest of the church is more 'typical' 16th century Renaissance-style, although of Roman rather than Lombard design. The dome is the largest in Milan.

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