San Lorenzo and Sant'Eustorgio, Milan

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Corso Ticinese

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  • San Lorenzo and Sant'Eustorgio
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  • San Lorenzo and Sant'Eustorgio
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  • San Lorenzo and Sant'Eustorgio
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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    San Lorenzo Maggiore

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 19, 2005

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    San Lorenzo Maggiore
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    It is fascinating to observe the interior and pick out the Rarly Christian plan from the 16th century modifications. The chapel of St. Aquilinus and St. Hippolytus were built adjacent to the basilica in the IV century, while the small mausoleum to St. Sixtus dates from the early 6th century. Destoyed by fires on several occasions, it was rebuilt by Martino Bassi after it collapsed in 1573.
    The interior is worthy of admiration not only for its sixteenth century style, but also for its early Christian base.
    The wall paintings extant in San Lorenzo are extremely important, as they are among the few examples of Roman paintings left in Milan.

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    San Lorenzo Maggiore

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 19, 2005

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    San Lorenzo Maggiore

    The basilica of San Lorenzo Maggiore, built between the 4th and 5th centuries, is probably made of material taken from the nearby Roman amphitheatre. Its original Rerly Christian plan was later altered in 1573 by Martino Bassi who managed to preserve much of the original octagonal shape and who is responsible for the dome set on the high drum.
    Oriental influence has been recognized in the square towers at the four sides with the apses inscribed within the square thus formed; it has been claimed that the plan actually comes from Byzantium.

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    The Roman columns

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 19, 2005

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    Colonne Romane
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    In the populous quarter around Porta Ticinese are the most important remains of Mediolanum, capital of the Roman Empire of the West.
    The juxstaposition of the Roman columns next to the Early Christian basilica creates a truly stirring sight. The sixteen fluted marle columns with Corinthian capitals definitely belonged to a Roman building of the late Imperial period (2nd or 3rd century B.C), either baths, a temple or a palace.

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    San Lorenzo Columns

    by sierralyndon Written Sep 12, 2003

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    The columns at night

    These columns are situated in front of the San Lorenzo church. They are quite pretty at night when they're all lit up. Unfortunately these days it appears to be the hangout place of ruffians. Residents around the area have much problems I think. But it is still safe enough to walk around there, as there are lots of people. It is also on Corso Porta Ticinese the road which takes you down to the Navigli... plenty of bars and cafes around there to have your aperitivo.

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    Funeral at Sant' Eustorgio

    by littlesam1 Updated Feb 13, 2003

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    A funeral at Sant' Eustorgio

    This little guy in the hat always gets himself into trouble even when he is trying to behave. I was walking around Sant' Eustorgio and admiring the basilica and heard beautiful choral singing coming out of the church. I decided to go up to the church and take a peek inside and see what was going on. I thought maybe it was a service of some kind and I was interested in seeing about it. Just as I was walking up the driveway the doors opened and six men came out carrying a coffin. I had almost interrupted a funeral service. I was so glad I did not actually go inside and intrude. If you look closely at the picture and click on it to enlarge it you can see part of the group attending the funeral. So now I was in two Italian cities with and saw two funerals. One is on my Venice page with a boat hearse. And now this one. I had taken this picture just before I started to walk towards the church so I did not realize I was taking a picture of a funeral. Right after I took the picture the men walked out with the coffin. I felt really bad about taking the picture but did not realize at the time it was a funeral.

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    Sant 'Eustorgio

    by littlesam1 Written Feb 13, 2003

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    Sant' Eustorgio

    This basilica was built during the 11th century over the site of an original 4th century church. The original church was built to house the relics of the Magi. However the relics were taken the cathedral in Cologne in1164. I really found this interesting because I had been to Cologne in 2001 and was fascinated with the cathedral there and the relics of the Magi. I had no idea they were originally from Milan. Then to complete the story a portion of the relics were returned here to Sant' Eustorgio in 1903. This is celebrated each year during Epiphany.

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    Corinthian Columns at San Lorenzo

    by littlesam1 Written Feb 13, 2003

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    Corinthian Columns from 2nd or 3rd century

    These sixteen Corinthian columns are directly in from of San Lorenzo. The are thought to be from the 2nd or 3rd century and were part of an unidentified pagan temple. There were placed in this location probably around the 4th century. The statue in the middle of the square in front of the basicila is of Constantine. it is a bronze copy of a Roman statue.

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    San Lorenzo

    by littlesam1 Updated Feb 13, 2003

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    San Lorenzo

    San Lorenzo is one of many beautiful basilica's to be found in Milan. The main basilica is dated to the fourth century. The basilica is found in the southwest section of the city. The church itself is round in shape and is considered one of the oldest round churches still existing. From this picture you can see part of the original medievel walls of the city behind the Basicila.

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    San Lorenzo

    by AgentJX Written Aug 26, 2002

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    This is a picture of the main entrance into the church from near the Roman columns. The statue is of Emperor Constantine who issued the Edict of Milan in 313 AD, gave the rights to practice free religion to all citizens of Rome. This ultimately paved the way for a Christian majority in the Roman Empire. The tall dome and some of the additions are also visible.

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    Stop by San Lorenzo alla...

    by AgentJX Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Stop by San Lorenzo alla Colonne
    This church has a little bit of everything, from the Roman columns that stand outside its court yard, to its statue of Emperor Constantine, to the many different styles of architecture that have been added as the church has grown and been renovated. I visited this church on several occasions. The dome is the largest in Milan and off to the side is the Cappella di Sant’Aquilino which still has a few pieces of the mosaics that used to coverd the entire chapel.

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