Santa Maria Delle Grazie Last Supper, Milan

4.5 out of 5 stars 71 Reviews

Corso Magenta

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Santa Maria Delle Grazie Last Supper
    by ettiewyn
  • Santa Maria Delle Grazie
    Santa Maria Delle Grazie
    by IreneMcKay
  • Santa Maria Delle Grazie
    Santa Maria Delle Grazie
    by IreneMcKay
  • Rixie's Profile Photo

    The Twelve, Plus a Friend

    by Rixie Updated Jan 16, 2014

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Church of Santa Maria delle Grazie

    Leonardo da Vinci's painting, The Last Supper, in the church of Santa Maria delle Grazie, reaches across the centuries and plucks at your heartstrings.

    It's a large, symbolic painting that took da Vinci four years to finish. Because he chose to paint with tempera on wood, which allowed him to make changes, the painting began deteriorating even in his lifetime. Today it is faded but still powerful.

    I was knocked out by the amount of Scriptural research da Vinci did. For example, he painted it high on the wall to show that the Last Supper took place in a room on the second floor, and also incorporated different friendships and alliances into the composition.

    Augggh story: Jesus' feet were originally visible under the table - their position mirrored its sister painting, The Crucifixion, across the church. But a 17th century monk enlarged the door under the painting, cutting off a chunk of it. (But the good news is, they had a bigger door to the kitchen...)

    Buy your ticket online before you go. Only 25 people at a time are allowed in the room (heat and humidity generated by our bodies could damage the painting), so tickets often sell out weeks ahead of time. We bought ours six weeks in advance from Tickitaly for 21 Euros each. This included a 15 minute guided tour, which was fascinating.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Delle Grazie

    by IreneMcKay Written Jan 8, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Santa Maria Delle Grazie
    3 more images

    Santa Maria delle Grazie is mainly famous for Leonardo da Vinci's 'Last Supper' which is housed in the adjoining refectory.

    The Dominican Order commissioned Guiniforte Solari to build this church for their monastery. The church was finally completed in 1490. In 1943 allied bombings damaged the church, but it was restored in 1947.

    To see the Last Supper you must book in advance. We did not. We just admired the beautiful church from outside. There is a lovely view from the rear courtyard.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Roadquill's Profile Photo

    Da Vinci's "Last Supper"

    by Roadquill Written Nov 27, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We joined a morning tour that also included a visit to the Church holding Da Vinci's Last Supper. Interesting facts such as the doorway cut into part of the work, that it was in the eating room, and thus subject to the smoke and cooking remnants. It is a masterpiece and will worth the visit. No photos allowed inside. Interesting that the church and facility are so understated when compared to what it houses.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Some interesting details.

    by Oleg_D. Updated Nov 9, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The history of the Dominican Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie starts in 1463 when Francesco Sforza the famous Italian Condotier and Grand Duke of Milan endowed the parcel of land to Dominican Friars. Others sources say that donated land belonged to Count Gasparo Vimercati who was the commander of city militia of Milan. Dominicans hired Giunforte Solari who started to build the Convent. The New Grand Duke of Milan Ludovico il Moro Sforza commissioned Donato Bramante to enlarge the church. Bramante rebuilt church and added large semi circular apses, built new dome tower, cloisters and refectory. The church is famous because its refectory houses the Leonardo da Vinci mural “The last supper”.
    You can see another interesting triptych icon in the first chapel on your left hand side. There are Virgin Mary with baby Jesus, Saint John the Baptist and Saint Peter the Martyr also known as Peter of Verona in the icon. Peter Martyr was born in the family of Cathar heretics but was converted to Catholicism because the sermon of Saint Dominique. Peter joined the Order of Brothers the Preachers and became Dominican Monk and Inquisitor of Lombardy. He was killed by the assassins hired by Milanese Cathars. There are a lot of icons with Black Friars (Dominicans) who were killed and became martyrs. We should remember that they controlled the Inquisition and were Inquisitors. That profession, I mean the trade of Inquisitor, was very unpopular and dangerous.
    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod inside the church is allowed but strictly prohibited in refectory.

    Open from Monday through Friday:
    From 07:00 – 12:00 hrs.
    And 15:00 – 17:00 hrs.
    Saturday and Sunday:
    From: 07:15 – 12:15 hrs.
    And 15:30 – 21:00 hrs.
    Opening hours of the Sagrestia Bramantesca are:
    Monday: 09:30 – 13:00 and 14:00 – 18:00 hrs.
    From Tuesday through Sunday:
    08:30 – 19:00 hrs.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    The Cloisters and Refectory

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 30, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Refectory and Last Supper are in yellow building!
    4 more images

    The refectory with its Last Supper is situated in separate building near the entrance to church. You cannot miss it because there big poster with inscription “Cenacolo Vinciano” hangs on the wall. We should take into consideration that, in fact Last Supper is no fresco at all or not true fresco because it painted with oil and tempera on the dry parget. You will be part of a group of visitors consisting no more than twenty five people and you will have fifteen minutes to observe and enjoy Last Supper. That’s more than enough. Some people take binoculars to see some details of that mural and results of restoration.
    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod inside the church is allowed but strictly prohibited in refectory.
    You must book your tickets in advance. It is almost impossible to visit the Refectory and Lust Supper without preliminary buying or booking of tickets. There are many internet sites where you can purchase your tickets. I used this one:
    http://www.milan-museum.com/?gclid=CIvGsLv277YCFat7cAodVRsALQ

    I just came fifteen minutes before my scheduled time and changed the voucher received via e-mail for my tickets. You will be able to take some pictures of the cloisters through the window glass while waiting for invitation to enter the Refectory’s hall.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Delle Grazie‎. Altar&Choirs.

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 30, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The history of the Dominican Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie starts in 1463 when Francesco Sforza the famous Italian Condotier and Grand Duke of Milan endowed the parcel of land to Dominican Friars. Others sources say that donated land belonged to Count Gasparo Vimercati who was the commander of city militia of Milan. Dominicans hired Giunforte Solari who started to build the Convent. The New Grand Duke of Milan Ludovico il Moro Sforza commissioned Donato Bramante to enlarge the church. Bramante rebuilt church and added large semi circular apses, built new dome tower, cloisters and refectory. The church is famous because its refectory houses the Leonardo da Vinci mural “The last supper”.
    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod inside the church is allowed but strictly prohibited in refectory.
    Open from Monday through Friday:
    From 07:00 – 12:00 hrs.
    And 15:00 – 17:00 hrs.
    Saturday and Sunday:
    From: 07:15 – 12:15 hrs.
    And 15:30 – 21:00 hrs.
    Opening hours of the Sagrestia Bramantesca are:
    Monday: 09:30 – 13:00 and 14:00 – 18:00 hrs.
    From Tuesday through Sunday:
    08:30 – 19:00 hrs.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Delle Grazie‎. Iteriors.

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 30, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The history of the Dominican Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie starts in 1463 when Francesco Sforza the famous Italian Condotier and Grand Duke of Milan endowed the parcel of land to Dominican Friars. Others sources say that donated land belonged to Count Gasparo Vimercati who was the commander of city militia of Milan. Dominicans hired Giunforte Solari who started to build the Convent. The New Grand Duke of Milan Ludovico il Moro Sforza commissioned Donato Bramante to enlarge the church. Bramante rebuilt church and added large semi circular apses, built new dome tower, cloisters and refectory. The church is famous because its refectory houses the Leonardo da Vinci mural “The last supper”.
    Interiors of the church are beautiful although we should remember that almost all ceiling painting are not original because they the destroyed during WW II by allied air bomb. Thank the painters who restored it for us.
    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod inside the church is allowed but strictly prohibited in refectory.

    Open from Monday through Friday:
    From 07:00 – 12:00 hrs.
    And 15:00 – 17:00 hrs.
    Saturday and Sunday:
    From: 07:15 – 12:15 hrs.
    And 15:30 – 21:00 hrs.
    Opening hours of the Sagrestia Bramantesca are:
    Monday: 09:30 – 13:00 and 14:00 – 18:00 hrs.
    From Tuesday through Sunday:
    08:30 – 19:00 hrs.

    Piazza Santa Maria delle Grazie, 2
    20123, Milano
    +39 02 467 6111

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Delle Grazie‎

    by Oleg_D. Updated Apr 29, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The history of the Dominican Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie starts in 1463 when Francesco Sforza the famous Italian Condotier and Grand Duke of Milan endowed the parcel of land to Dominican Friars. Others sources say that donated land belonged to Count Gasparo Vimercati who was the commander of city militia of Milan. Dominicans hired Giunforte Solari who started to build the Convent. The New Grand Duke of Milan Ludovico il Moro Sforza commissioned Donato Bramante to enlarge the church. Bramante rebuilt church and added large semi circular apses, built new dome tower, cloisters and refectory. The church is famous because its refectory houses the Leonardo da Vinci mural “The last supper”.
    Non commercial photo without flash light and tripod inside the church is allowed but strictly prohibited in refectory.
    Open from Monday through Friday:
    From 07:00 – 12:00 hrs.
    And 15:00 – 17:00 hrs.
    Saturday and Sunday:
    From: 07:15 – 12:15 hrs.
    And 15:30 – 21:00 hrs.
    Opening hours of the Sagrestia Bramantesca are:
    Monday: 09:30 – 13:00 and 14:00 – 18:00 hrs.
    From Tuesday through Sunday:
    08:30 – 19:00 hrs.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • basstbn's Profile Photo

    The Last Supper

    by basstbn Written Mar 20, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Entry to the Last Supper Museum
    2 more images

    The number one thing to do in Milan: See Leonardo's masterpiece of religious art - "The Last Supper." It's a bit of a hassle, but the moment you set eyes on this grand work of art, you will forget all the trouble you went to in order to see it - if only for your allotted fifteen minutes. I witnessed more than a few folks crying at the sight of this overwhelming painting, many as a spiritual reaction to the meaning of Christ's final evening with his disciples, while others responded to it merely as a one of the great works of art.

    First tip: as soon as you learn when you will be in Milano, check the web sit to determine if you can get tickets, or when they will go on sale for your day(s). The first day on which you may order tickets, get online early in the morning (remember the time difference) to make your purchase. I went online about 7 in the morning (Central US time), found there were only a few openings remaining, so immediately booked for the time slot available. [Note - if you are being herded around on a tour group, this will not be a problem, but for independent travelers a necessity.] The web address noted below will take you to the ticket booking screen.

    Arrive at the Cenacolo Vinciniano Museum ahead of time. Your group of (about 25?) will be assembled at the appointed hour and you will meet a guide who will lead you through a couple of "decontamination" rooms while giving helpful background information and history. When you are admitted, you will be allowed fifteen minutes. No photography or videography of any kind is allowed.

    My initial reaction was at the size of the mural and its resplendent colors. I did not expect it to take up so much of the wall on which it was painted. As to the bright colors, that reaction was based upon viewing it from a distance; you will note a change in its vibrancy as you get closer.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • oriettaIT's Profile Photo

    See Leonardo Masterpiece The Last Supper

    by oriettaIT Written Mar 15, 2013
    The Last Supper - reproduction
    2 more images

    It is not possible to visit Milano and pass on the Last Supper. Leonardo masterpiece is a must see!
    The frescos is located inside the Santa Maria delle Grazie church and the visit required to be booked well in advance. It is possible to make the reservation online or with a phone call, the reference are in this site listed below. Be aware that the online booking and the phone booking work with different availability list so if you cannot find an opening for the data you want online you might be able to find it calling the number. The service answer in multiple language.
    The visit last about 30 minutes, I found them to be right on schedule. They allow about 30 people at the time in the room and you can rent audio guide for a few euros. I suggest you do as the explanation they give is very good and it helps understand better the painting.
    The only negative side about my visit was the presence of a couple of tour group in my same time frame, their guides were way too loud!
    You are not allowed to take picture during the visit, but just outside there is a reproduction you can shoot for good memories ;)

    The church Santa Maria delle Grazie deserve a visit on its own, it is free of admission and you can visit it while you wait your turn to get into the Last supper room

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • ettiewyn's Profile Photo

    Leonardo da Vinci - The Last Supper

    by ettiewyn Updated Sep 8, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    I must admit that at first, I was not even that keen to visit "The Last Supper". Although I am interested in the arts, I figured that this might be a huge tourist trap because of its connection to the Dan Brown novel, and I was not really prepared to pay an entrance fee just to see one painting.
    What made me change my mind was reading MalenaN's tip about visiting the painting. I was sure that if she liked it so much, I would too! And I did!!! This is just another proof of how great VT really is - and how much worth it is to read tips and reviews by people one "knows", by people with whom one shares tastes and points of views, and thus can be sure how to judge their writing - as opposed to other travel sites where some anonymous, quickly written words are all one gets.

    We preordered our tickets on tickitaly, which was horrendously expensive, but I just wanted to be sure we would have a ticket. We paid 23€ each for a ticket and I don't really want to think about this! I am not sure if there are any operators who offer cheaper in advance tickets (please let me know if you do). A ticket purchased on the day on location is much cheaper - I think it is still 6,50€ - but we were traveling in August and I just did not want to take the risk.

    So - now finally to the experience itself. Unfortunately, we arrived very tired and stressed. We had tickets for a very early time slot at 08.15am, but we had underestimated the time it would need to get to Santa Maria delle Grazie, so we arrived at last minute. All this was forgotten, though, when we finally entered the refectory.
    Leonardo da Vinci painted the scene of the Last Supper on a wall in the refectory of Santa Maria dell Grazie. The entrance to the refectory is next to the main façade of the church, so coming from the direction of Cadorna, you need to walk all around it until you come to the small square. You then need to wait until you are let in. You need to go through different doors, until arriving in the air-conditioned room.
    It is a huge painting - 460cm x 880cm - and it really is overwhelming when you enter the room. You are only allowed to enter with a group, led by a guide, and you can stay in the room for fifteen minutes until you must leave again. Unfortunately the guides were unfriendly, but even this did not disturb the atmosphere. This huge painting with its bright colours seemed to be so lively, the expressions of the faces of the apostles, their vivid gestures and the shaken atmosphere - it is most impressive. We were very touched by the painting, and I still recall it when I close my eyes.

    On the opposite wall, there is another painting that was mostly ignored by the visitors. It is the "Crucifixion" by Giovanno Donato da Montorfano. While it was not as moving as the "Last Supper", it was equally impressive - the three huge crosses, the bright colours and many details... As my younger cousin is called Magdalena, we were also delighted to see Mary Magdalene in the painting, kneeling at the cross.

    What can I say - these paintings don't need the Dan Brown novel at all to be a top attraction. I enjoyed my visit so much that in the end I even think it was worth to pay so much. I did not write a lot here about how Leonardo created the painting because I am not knowledgeable about the arts, and I think others can explain all this much better than I could - but I enjoyed my visit very much. Oh, and another thing: Of course it is not allowed to take pictures in the refectory, and I did not take any, although obviously many people do and there are lots of secred snapshots to be seen on the net.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • ettiewyn's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria delle Grazie - inner courtyard

    by ettiewyn Written Sep 8, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    After you have explored the beautiful interior of the church, please take your time and discover another gem of this building - the inner courtyard. You can enter this courtyard either from Corso Magenta, or from the church, there is a small door leading to it close to the apse.

    The courtyard is a beautiful and very tranquil place, and we spent some time just sitting here in the shade and relaxing, enjoying the cool and quiet, and the spiritual atmosphere. It is a very green place, and you also have a great view of the church's high apse.

    There were also posters pointing out a Leonardo da Vinci exhibition in another part of the building, but we did not visit it because we already had seen the one in the Pinacoteca Ambrosiana.

    Was this review helpful?

  • ettiewyn's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria delle Grazie

    by ettiewyn Updated Sep 8, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Many people visit Santa Maria delle Grazie just to see the "Last Supper", but the church itself is absolutely worth a visit! And it is not at all connected to the painting these days - the painting is not owned by the church, and the church does not get any of the entrance fees paid by visitors who go and see the painting.
    After we had visited the painting ourselves and had had a little break on the square in front of the church, we went inside it - and it took our breath away. It was just so beautiful! Probably part of this is due to the fact that this was the first time that I saw a church of this style, so different to what I had seen before. But even so, I think it must amaze everyone who loves architecture and the arts.

    The church was built from 1463 to 1490, but the interior was changed many times during the course of time. The exterior looked quite unusual to me, mainly because of the bricks used - I think it is amazing that the building looks so beautiful and elegant despite of the use of this rough material.
    Inside, the nave largely has the original design, with beautiful frecoes and gothic arches. I thought that the light was just right inside, and the patterns painted on the ceiling and the arches were so wonderful. I had never seen a church like this before, and I loved it so much!

    Picture 2 shows the façade which looks quite plain, but has an interesting fresco above the door, showing the Virgin Mary freeing Milan from the plague (Madonna delle Grazie libera Milano dalla peste). It was painted by Giovanni Battista Crespi in 1631. You can see the door in picture 3.

    Five pictures are simply not enough for such a building, therefore I also have created a travelogue :-)

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria delle Grazie - the Tribune by Bramante

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 13, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    the Tribune of Santa Maria delle Grazie

    The church was just about ready when the new ruler of Milan, Lodovico il Moro, ordered it enlarged. Both presbytery and apse were torn down so that Donato Bramante could put his own design for the huge apse. It was begun in March 1492 and when it was completed in 1497 Lodovico had his wife, Beatrice d'Este, buried there. Bramante's great tribune was a lesson in Renaissance architecture to the artists of Lombardy, even though his idea of three apses radiating from a square is actually based on an older building, the Parma Cathedral. From the outside the tribune looks like a giant wheel resting upon a cube.
    Right now, July 2003, the Tribune is in the reconstruction.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria delle Grazie

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 13, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Santa Maria delle Grazie
    2 more images

    In 1463, a captain in Francesco Sforza's army, Gaspare Vimercati, donated a plot of land to the Domenican order. On the site was a chapel adorned with a fresco of the Virgin, the so-called Madonna delle Grazie. The monks commissioned Guiniforte Solari to build a church and monastery on the plot, and ground was broken on September 10, 1463. The church that Solari built between 1466 and 1490 is a typical example of the transition stage between Gothic and Renaissance, as can be seen in the Lombard style gabled facade decorated with pilaster strips and pierced by a single opening below and several niches above. Only the gabled portal belongs to the period when the Renaissance architect Bramante was involved in the work.
    Leonardo's "Last Supper"
    Leonardo da Vinci spent eighteen years in Milano, at the court of Ludovico il Moro. He started work on the fresco in 1496 when he recived a commission from Ludovico who, after having enlarged the church of Santa Maria delle Grazie, decided to enlarge and decorate the Refectory (Dining Hall) of the adjacent Dominican monastery.
    Do not miss to see it when visiting this church!

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Milan

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

102 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Santa Maria Delle Grazie Last Supper
3.0 out of 5 stars
1 Review
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
3 Reviews
0.3 miles away
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
0.4 miles away
Show Prices

View all Milan hotels