Teatro alla Scala, Milan

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  • Herkbert's Profile Photo

    Take a tour or experience a performance.

    by Herkbert Written Sep 18, 2011
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    We weren't lucky enough to be in Milan to catch a performance at the Teatro alla Scala, but we did take a tour through this historic venue. Outside, while nice, the building does not really grab your eye. Inside, however, is a different story. Walking through the halls and peering into the theater was quite a thrill. Next time we'll definitely catch a performance.

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    World famous opera house

    by cheezecake_deli Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Outside La Scala

    The Teatro alla Scala, Milan's famous opera house, was completed in the late 18th century, to replace a former theatre destroyed by fire. Its grand building has hosted the world premieres of several operas. You can purchase a cheap standby ticket on the day of the performance.

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  • See the Opera and Ballet- But Where?

    by Jetgirly Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    I went to the Teatro della Scala box office and purchased a ticket for the ballet. When I left the box office and looked at the ticket, I realized the performance would be held at Teatro degli Arcimboldi, miles away from the city center and lacking the historical beauty of Teatro della Scala. The lesson here is to check with the box office attendant before you buy your ticket ( biglietto in Italian) and make sure your performance is in the Teatro della Scala. For €5 you can also take a tour of the Theatre Museum, for those who want to experience the beautiful architecture and design without seeing a show.

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    The Teatro alla Scala

    by jrgentle Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    cheeeeeesse

    The Teatro alla Scala was founded, under the auspices of the Empress Maria Theresa of Austria, to replace the Royal Ducal Theatre, which was destroyed by fire on 26 February 1776 and had until then been the home of opera in Milan.
    The cost of building the new theatre was borne by the owners of the boxes at the Ducal, in exchange for possession of the land on which stood the church of Santa Maria alla Scala (hence the name) and for renewed ownership of their boxes.
    Designed by the great neoclassical architect Giuseppe Piermarini, La Scala opened on 3 August 1778 with Antonio Salieri's opera L'Europa riconosciuta, to a libretto by Mattia Verazi.

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    La Scala

    by TRimer Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    La Scala

    Rising above Piazza della Scala (itself dominated by a monument dedicated to da Vinci) is the renowned Teatro alla Scala. La Scala, as it is commonly known, first raised its curtain in 1778 and has treated generations of opera aficionados to arias aplenty over the years.

    La Scala is now home to the opera, ballet and a theatre museum. Visiting the museum is said to be like a backstage tour. It has costumes and costume sketches, souvenirs from past conductors, composers and singers of the opera, and a collection of marionettes and puppet theaters. Visiting you can get a glimpse of the inside of the theater.

    Two halls in La Scala are devoted to Milan’s darling Verdi, whose ‘Slaves Chorus’ from Nabucco remains the unofficial Italian anthem. Memorabilia include the spinet on which he learned to play, scores in his own hand and the jewel-encrusted baton presented to him after the triumphal reception of Aida. Rossini, Puccini and Toscanini are honoured alongside him.

    The theater was heavily damaged by bombs during WWII, but reopened in 1946 under the baton of famed composer Arturo Toscanini, who had returned to Milan after an eight-year stint as director of the New York Philharmonic.

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  • penny_g's Profile Photo

    La Scala (Teatro alla Scala)

    by penny_g Written Feb 17, 2011

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    Actually, I have expected to see more and something more glamourous when I have to see the world famous La Scala for the first time but I could not believe when I saw the grey decent building in the first time. Anyway package is not as important as the content, so teh good concerts, offered inside may compensate the facade. They say the Teatro alla Scala offers great collections, the Livia Simoni library and look out over the auditorium. Guided tours are also offered. The square in front of and behind it are nice, probably more in the warm summer months.

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  • csordila's Profile Photo

    The most world famous opera house

    by csordila Updated Mar 2, 2010

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    Stage plan to Zeffirelli���s Aida performance  2006
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    The Neoclassical building of Scala with its exceptional acoustics was the sample for many other opera houses in the world, but first of all in Italy.
    Its construction as a fitting replacement for the Teatro Ducale (sadly destroyed by fire), in the late 1700s took place by the help of Empress Maria Teresa of Austria, who was also Duchess of Milan in the same time. The new Scala was inaugurated on August 3rd, 1778 with the premiere of Europa riconosciuta of Antonio Salieri.

    The earlier popular Neapolitan "opera buffa" in its program replaced by Rossini's romantic operas eventually and in the first quarter of the 19th century La Scala became the traditional place of the Italian melodrama, which persists even today.
    In its repertoire, however, you can find also ballet and foreign operas of composers such as Mozart, Strauss, Stravinsky, Debussy etc. with the performances of famous artists including Callas, Peggy Fonteyn or Nureyev.

    The 2008 season has started at the end of October, to my biggest surprise,: the operetta par excellence, the masterwork of the Hungarian Lehár, "Die Lustige Witwe."

    Try to take in a performance if you are here between the beginning of November and the end of June. Tickets are like gold dust, for a seat on the orchestra level, expect to spend a fortune, if avalable. If you can manage to get tickets, wear casual suit; you are there for glamour and you have to do your part too.

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  • eugini2001's Profile Photo

    La Scala

    by eugini2001 Written Sep 17, 2009

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    The only thing that bothers me about the world famous theater that it was built on the former location of the church of Santa Maria della Scala( from which the theatre gets its name) and, most important, the church was deconsecrated and demolished. The La Scala Museum accessible from the theatre's foyer and a part of the house contains an extraordinary collection of paintings, drafts, statues, costumes, and other documents regarding opera and La Scala's history. Inside the theatre reminds the theater in Odessa, but Odessa one looks spacier, maybe just because I don’t like those boxes at all. If I decided to go to the opera I would definitely booked the front seats next to the orchestra pit.

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    "The Da Vinci Code"

    by starship Updated Mar 25, 2009

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    The reign of Da Vinci

    Directly behind the Vittorio Emanuele Galleria and facing La Scala is the Piazza La Scala. In the center is a monument consisting of several statutes of which the one of Da Vinci dominates. I'm not exactly sure what the Da Vinci connection is here, but maybe after I find the book on Milan that I bought, it can shed some light on this. Or if any of you VT's have the facts, let me know. The statue of Da Vinci seemed eerie to me after having read "The Da Vinci Code" a few months ago which connected him with the "illuminati."

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    Lend Me a Tenor!

    by starship Updated Mar 25, 2009

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    Postcard of La Scala

    Perhaps the most venerated temple to opera in the world is the Teatro alla Scala but its outside appearance seems to belie its internal beauty. Designed by architect Giuseppe Piermarini, La Scala opened its doors to the world in 1778 with Antonio Salieri's "L'Europa Riconosciuta." La Scala was built, under the "auspices" of the Empress Maria Theresa of Austria, to replace the Regio Teatro Ducal built in 1589 which was destroyed by fire. In a complicated situation of land ownership, the owners of theater boxes of the Ducal were the individuals who actually paid for the building of La Scala which is built on the former site of the church of Santa Maria alla Scala.

    La Scala is known far and wide for its incomparable acoustics and the many musical giants who performed here or had their works performed here including Verdi; opera singer, Maria Callas; and Arturo Toscanini. It is also home to Scuolo di Ballo (La Scalla's Ballet Company) and Museo Teatrale alla Scala which is located in its annex. For those VT'rs who were Thespians and Garricks, you might enjoy the museum here which is said to be a treasure of paintings, sculpture, backdrops and other memorabilia of prominent singers and composers who have created history in La Scala. La Scala was undergoing renovation (which began in 2002), the face of La Scala was shrouded when I saw it (March 2004). Apparently, renovations have now been completed.

    NOTICE: please check the website to make sure that any performances you plan to attend are, in fact, actually taking place. A quick check today (3/25/09) revealed that a performance of "I due Foscari" scheduled for 3/31/09 is being cancelled due to a national strike!!

    Check the website for current prices of admission to the various tours, museums or for combination tickets.

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  • lina112's Profile Photo

    La Scala

    by lina112 Written Aug 3, 2008

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    Is one of the world's most famous opera houses. The theatre was inaugurated on 3 August 1778, under the name Nuovo Regio Ducal Teatro alla Scala with Salieri's Europa riconosciuta. La Scala's season traditionally opens on 7 December, Saint Ambrose's Day, Milan's patron saint. All performances must end before midnight; long operas start earlier in the evening if need be. Ticketholders are not allowed to enter after the performance has begun.

    El Teatro de la Scala es uno de los teatros más famosos del mundo. Fue el primer monumento reconstruido tras los bombardeos de 1943 y cuenta con el privilegio de haber sido sede del estreno de muchas óperas famosas y de haber mantenido una relación muy especial con el compositor Giuseppe Verdi.

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    Museo Teatrale alla Scala

    by Nemorino Written Jun 28, 2008

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    1. Entrance to the museum
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    In one wing of the opera house, off to the left of the main entrance, is the Theater Museum of La Scala.

    The first photo shows the entrance to the museum, which is also the entrance to the galleries when there is an opera performance. And this is also where the scalpers tend to hang out trying to sell black-market tickets at exorbitant prices.

    The museum consists of ten rooms with displays of musical instruments, paintings and other artifacts from the history of opera in general and La Scala in particular.

    Also there is a space for temporary exhibitions. When I was there the exhibit was on the singer Maria Callas at La Scala.

    No photography is allowed inside the museum.

    The museum is open almost every day (all except nine days per year) from 9 am to 12.30 pm (last entrance at 12 noon) and from 1.30 pm to 5.30 pm (last entrance at 5 pm). A normal full-price admission ticket costs five Euros and includes a glimpse of the auditorium from one of the boxes, except when rehearsals or performances are in progress.

    When I was there they were adjusting the lighting for the first act of Verdi's Macbeth (as in other opera houses, an extra player wearing one of the costumes had to stand around for hours while they did this), but we were allowed to have a look just the same.

    Second photo: For three days during my visit to Milan there was a large trailer from the Cecilia Bartoli Music Foundation parked outside the museum. In it was an interesting free exhibition on the famous singer Maria Malibran (1808-1836). Malibran was the big star of La Scala for three seasons in the 1830s. Of course Cecilia Bartoli herself was also in town to give a recital of arias from Malibran's repertoire, "Malibran Rediscovered".

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    Getting tickets for La Scala

    by Nemorino Updated Jun 28, 2008

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    1. Young people lining up for tickets
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    If for some reason you would like to attend an opera performance at Milan's Teatro alla Scala (even after reading my other tips, LOL), you of course have to buy a ticket, which can be a problem since performances are generally sold out weeks or months ahead of time.

    One way is to line up (well in advance of the date you want!) at the box office in the Duomo subway station, as these young folks are doing, though I suspect they are eligible for student tickets at reduced prices.

    Or you can try to get one of the 140 numbered gallery tickets that go on sale on the day of the performance. There are elaborate regulations for getting one of these tickets -- only one per person. I've never done it, so I can't speak from personal experience, but basically you have to line up at the ticket office in Via Filodrammatici (not the one in the subway station) by 1 pm to get your name put on the list, and then be there again at 5.30 pm for the roll call and sale of the tickets. And then be back at 8 pm for the performance, so it's pretty much of an all-day procedure.

    Another way is to spend several hundred Euros and buy a black-market ticket from one of the scalpers who hang around the entrance to the Scala Museum every afternoon. These are shady-looking characters who talk out of the sides of their mouths, wear their hats down over their eyes and have several tickets fanned out in one hand (I'm not making this up).

    Or you could buy your tickets on the internet, as I did. After lots of clicking around I finally managed to snag tickets for two different performances.

    They have a list on their website of when each opera goes on sale (about two months before the premiere), and when I tried to access their website at 9 a.m. Italian time on the first day I kept getting notices saying they were overloaded and please try again later.

    When I got in an hour later there were no tickets left, BUT. . . I discovered that the trick is to try again six hours later, because anyone who has reserved a ticket has six hours to pay for it, and if they don't it goes back on sale.

    So at 3 pm Italian time the number of available tickets on different dates starts changing from 0 to 1 or 2 or whatever (the record was 13 while I was watching), and then back to 0 again a few minutes later. So you just have to keep watching the numbers, and when a ticket you want shows up on the screen, pounce on it. Of course it helps if you live in the same time zone and have nothing particular to do on that afternoon.

    If you live in California, for instance, you would have to get up at six o'clock in the morning to do this.

    Second photo: More people lining up for tickets at the box office in the subway station.

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  • muratkorman's Profile Photo

    The famous theater

    by muratkorman Written Oct 9, 2007

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    Scala 1
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    Scala is one of the most famous theater in Italy and Europe for the performances taking place. It has gone through a long renovation which unfortunately coincided with my expatriate period in Milan. However, it doesn't change the fact that this theater is a must see if you come to Milan. You have 2 options. The first one is to take a guided tour and see the theater when empty. The second one is to find a ticket and watch a performance. I only suggest the first plan if you can't succeed in plan two.

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  • Maggies's Profile Photo

    LA SCALA

    by Maggies Updated Mar 4, 2007

    It's one of the world's best and most famous opera houses. It was built by Giuseppe Piermarini at the end of 18th century. Although it suffered major damage during the IIWW, it was perfectly renovated.

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