Susa Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by JLBG
  • Close-up on the frise, the bull
    Close-up on the frise, the bull
    by JLBG
  • Arco di Augusto
    Arco di Augusto
    by JLBG

Most Recent Things to Do in Susa

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Traditional house covered with "lauzes"

    by JLBG Updated Jan 5, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Traditional house covered with
    1 more image

    Susa is a small city and even in the city center, there remains old traditional houses with balconies covered by the roof in order to remain snow free in winter. The roof covered with thick slabs of slate called "lauzes" on both sides of the Alps, in France as well as in Italy. The same name is used in Valsusa and Salbertrand, in higher Susa Valley is known for its lauze processing. This process was nearly abandoned but there is now a renewal because of the interest in keeping traditions. Mountain villages covered with lauzes looks much more appealing than mountain villages covered with always rusted corrugated iron sheets !

    The second photo was shot from the castle and shows a feneral view of the city. It shows that though many houses are covered with "lauzes", there are still a few of them covered with tiles but fortunately no with corrugated iron.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Arco di Augusto, close up on the frise (1)

    by JLBG Updated Jan 4, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Top of the Arco di Augusto
    4 more images

    OIn both sides, the Arco di Augusto is topped by a frise that represents the "suovetaurilia", the sacrifice made by Cozio to celebrate the alliance. The suovetaurilia was the sacrifice a pig (suus), a sheep (ovis) and a bull (taurus), hence the name suovetaurilia.

    The first photo is a picture of the top of the Arco.

    The second photo (enlarge) is a close up on a large bull, lead by two servants.

    The third photo is a close up on a huge pig, also lead by servants

    The fourth photo is a part of the procession with two men blowing into a hunting horn while two others hold an ax (for the sacrifice of the animals ?)

    The last photo shows another part of the procession with a big box. It don't know what it is but will try to learn.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    View on the city from Arco di Augusto

    by JLBG Updated Jan 3, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    clock tower
    3 more images

    The first photo shows the view from the street climbing to Arco di Augusto with on the right the clock tower.

    The second photo was taken more westwards. The clock tower is on the far right while cattedrale San Giusto stands on the left.

    The third photo was taken from upstreet and cattedrale San Giusto appears now completely on the background of the city.

    The fourth photo shows a sign affixed in the park, that says :

    VIII a.C- MCMXCII n.C.
    Nel Bimillenario dell'Arco che idealmente congiuge le origine e il compimento del cammino verso l'unita europea, la popolazioni delle Alpi occidentali, eredi delle tribu Coziane e della storica alleanza qui stipulata tra Cozio, I re delle Alpi ed Augusto, fondatore dell'impero Romano, Auspicando intese sempre piu forti e feconde tra popoli e nazioni.
    Posero, Susa 19 luglio 1992

    8BC-1992AD
    For the bimillenary of the Arc that ideally mixes the origins and the success on the road for European unity, the people of the Western Alps, heirs of the Cozian tribes and of the historic alliance between Cozio, king of the Alps and August, builder of the Roman Empire, wishing an always stronger and more fecund friendship between people and nations. Susa, July 19th 1992

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Porta Savoia

    by JLBG Updated Jan 3, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Porta Savoia
    3 more images

    In order to protect the city from the invasions, it was, in the second century AD enclosed in a powerful city wall with round towers. Porta Savoia (Savoy entrance) opens in the west. It is made of two cylindrical towers with opening all around, allowing to defend in every direction. They were lowered in the XVIIIth.

    Porta Savoia is shown on the second photo from the outside of the city walls. There were main roadworks ahead and I could not take the photo as I would have liked to. On the left of the gate, the entrance of Cattedrale San Giusto (Cathedral Saint Just)

    The third photo was taken on the occasion of another visit, from the street that leads to Arco di Augusto and shows better Porta Savoia from the outside.

    The fourth photo shows then main entrance of Cattedrale San Giusto.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Druidic remains

    by JLBG Updated Jan 3, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Druid cup shaped rocks

    Close to the Arco di Augusto and at the foot of the medieval city wall, a post says :
    "Rocce cupulliformi druidiche, sec V-VI aC" (Druid cup shaped rocks, 5-6th BC).
    I have carefully looked at the rocks below but I must admit that if there had not been the post, I would not have seen anything special with them ! If they say they were used by the druids, I suppose they know it !

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Convento di San Francesco

    by JLBG Updated Jan 3, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Convento di San Francesco
    1 more image

    Church of San Francesco Convent is shown on the first photo from via Madonna delle Grazie (the church Madonna delle Grazie will be better seen on another tip), via San Francesco and in the background.

    Via San Francesco is a narrow street and I could not take a photo of the whole church. The second picture is actually made of three photos that I have pasted together !

    The San Francesco church, covered with lauzes is built on a cross plan. The side looks a traditional church in the Alps but the front has been recently rebuilt in a modern style which makes an amazing contrast. This is why I wanted to get the whole church on the same picture.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Contessa Adelaide castle and upper entrance

    by JLBG Updated Jan 3, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Contessa Adelaide castle
    2 more images

    The first photo shows the upper entrance into the city, with a twinned entrance. On the left, the medieval wall of the castle.

    The second photo shows the entrance into the Contessa Adelaide castle.

    The third shows the castle across the entrance.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Leaving Susa to the Mont Cenis pass

    by JLBG Updated Jan 3, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Susa to the Mont Cenis pass road
    1 more image

    The first photo was taken southeastwards from S25, the road that leads to the Mont Cenis pass. It shows in the valley, in the foreground the village of Venàus and in the background the city of Susa. The autostrada leads to Bardonnechia and the entrance of the Fréjus tunnel, leading into France at Modane, in the Maurienne valley. The two summits in the background, in the middle of the photo should be (I will check) Monte Orsiera (2878m) and Monte Rocciavre (2780m). The mountain in the forground should be Cima Centiplagna, separated from the two former by a narrow valley leading to the Colle delle Finestre (Windows Pass).

    The second photo was taken northwards from the same place than the previous one (the road is narrow and there are not many places where you can park !). It shows the massif of Rocciamelone with Santa Maria summit (3538m). The other side of the mountain is in France.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Frescoes

    by JLBG Updated Jan 3, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Entrance of the church
    4 more images

    The first photo shows the entrance of the church topped by a fresco (close up on the last photo) painting a classical scene on the cross with one soldier stinging Christ side with a sword while another rubs his wounds with a sponge impregnated with vinegar. Two saints are watching.

    The second photo shows, over a carved Malta cross, two angels holding the coat of arm of the city.

    The third and the fourth (close-up of the previous) show a much less classical representation of a scene, which unfortunately is in poor condition. Twelve persons, obviously the Apostle are represented, some standing in a group, some leaning on a lying body. In the background, a church is represented (San Giusto ?) while several persons are climbing in two apple trees and eating fruits.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Arco di Augusto, close up on the frise (2)

    by JLBG Updated Jan 3, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Close up on the frise, the ram
    4 more images

    On the other side of the Arc of August, the frise represents the same scenary but with different pictures.

    The first photo shows a huge sheep (actually better a ram !) followed by a man riding on a horse.

    The second photo shows another pig (or nother view of the same boar), pushed by an assistant.

    The third photo shows the bull with one assistant who pushes it while another pulls it.

    The fourth shows two beared men riding a horse, one holding a spear, the other looking backwards.

    The last shows again two horn blowers while two men walk in the opposite direction with a rod on their elbow.

    Related to:
    • Music
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Chiesa della Madonna del Ponte and adjacent museum

    by JLBG Updated Jan 3, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chiesa della Madonna del Ponte
    1 more image

    The church Madonna del Ponte (first photo), of Medieval origins (XIIIth century), is devoted to the Holy Virgin of Peace and, inside, has precious works of art. The church was built between 1266 and 1369. The name refers to a statue of the "Madonna con il Bambino" (Madonne with the Child), most likely from the XIIth century. It is now displayed at the Museo Diocesano.

    The "Museo Diocesano di Arte Sacra-Susae" (second photo) was inaugurated in September 22nd 2000. in the rector's office, a dependency of the church. The museum is divided in three part. The first shows artifacts from the treasury of the church, the second, the treasury from the cathedral della Madonna del Ponte and the third from the treasury of the diocese of Susa. Among others, you will admire the Tryptic of Rocciamelone (1358), a sculpted Lombard casket in wood and bones (VI/VIIth century) and the statue of the Madonna del Ponte (XIIth century). The old road that lead to the Mont Cenis pass is on display in the entrance of the museum.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Arco di Augusto

    by JLBG Updated Jan 3, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Arco di Augusto
    9 more images

    August arch was built in 9-8 BC to remind the alliance concluded in 13-12 BC between August and Cozio, king of Susa. It is decorated in a style very different from the usual Roman art. It is most likely to have been carved by local artists. It represents the "suovetaurilia", the sacrifice made by Cozio to celebrate the alliance. The suovetaurilia was the sacrifice a pig (suus), a sheep (ovis) and a bull (taurus), hence the name suovetaurilia.

    The first photo shows the arc seen from underneath, from the street coming from the city center.

    The second photo was taken almost under the Arc and shows a double entrance into the Medieval city wall.

    The third photo is a close up on this entrance, standing on top of a few stairs.

    The fourth photo shows the Arco di Augusto, seen from the medieval entrance.

    The last photo was taken from outside the city medieval entrance and shows bothe this entrance, and in the background the Arco di Augusto.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Round tower

    by JLBG Updated Jan 3, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hidden tower
    2 more images

    We were looking for the Roman arena when I saw the top of a round tower that emerged from the vegetation (enlarge the first photo if you want to see it). I tried to get closer from the tower as I thought it might be related with the arena.

    Actually, it seemed to be in a private property enclosed by high walls and I could not get any closer. I wonder if this is not one of those round towers that were built along the Roman city walls in the second century AD. The second photo gives a close up, over the walls of the property.

    On another visit to Susa, we went to the Arco di Augusto, which is uphill, on the north West to the city center. From there, I could see the tower from another direction. that does not tell if it dates back from the ancient Romans, but shows that it is incorporated into a chapel (third photo)

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Castello Contessa Adelaide

    by JLBG Updated Jan 3, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Castello Contessa Adelaide
    8 more images

    The story of Adelaide is tightly tied with the history Susa. She was born between 1010 and 1016 in the castle that now bears its name from Olderic Manfred, count of Turin and marquis of Susa and Berte of Este. She was the grand daughter of Arduino il Glabrione, un "condotierre" that ousted the Sarrazins from the valley of Susa in 976. Twice widowed, she married Oddone, Count of Savoie and Maurienne, sun of Umberto Biancamano/Humbert aux Blanches Mains (Humbert the White Handed).

    She brought him as a dowry a wide borderland "la marca arduinica" and "la marca del territorio Canavese". This marriage was the origin of the power of the Savoie dynasty that ruled the whole territory of the Alps. Their patrimony covered Savoie and Maurienne on the western side of the Alps, and on the eastern side, the Marquisate of Susa, the county of Turin, the Val d'Aoste and a great deal of castles and territories in Liguria.

    Adelaide gave birth to five children. The kings of Italy are the descendants of Adelaide.

    The first photo shows the castle from the city center.

    The second photo shows the entrance into the castle from top, from the Arco di Auguste.

    The third photo shows archeological excavations in progress in the catle yard.

    The fourth photo shows the outer wall of the castle from the castle yard. The Arco di Auguste is hidden behind.

    The last photo shows a part of the castle, seen from the yard, nos used for art exhibitions.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Clock tower

    by JLBG Updated Jan 3, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Old stone tower
    1 more image

    The first photo shows clock tower that stands at the foot of the castle of Contessa Adelaide. This is typical of a sober style of building that is widely found on both sides of the Alps : the design is square, the roof has four plain panels, the sides are few openings : one at the first level, two at the second and three for the two uppers levels.

    The second photo was taken on another trip to Susa from the castle, from a higher elevation. It shows better the tower in its surroundings.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Susa

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

69 travelers online now

Comments

Susa Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Susa things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Susa sightseeing.

View all Susa hotels