Torino Shopping

  • Baratti & Milano storefront
    Baratti & Milano storefront
    by BlueLlama
  • Libreria Luxembourg
    Libreria Luxembourg
    by BlueLlama
  • Fresh produce at Eataly Turin
    Fresh produce at Eataly Turin
    by BlueLlama

Most Recent Shopping in Torino

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    Eataly Turin Lingotto: Food and drink shopping taken to a new level

    by BlueLlama Updated Jan 3, 2014
    Fresh produce at Eataly Turin
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    Forget Harrods, this is what my vision of grocery shopping heaven looks like. Imagine if the fresh vegetables on sale were the very best examples of their type, if an unbelievable selection of cheeses, meats and seafood was piled high, if the bakery dished out only freshly made perfectly flavoursome bread, if there was every type of condiment, chocolate and dried goods available in mind-boggling variety... And of course a wonderful selection of drinks.

    This is Eataly Turin. A place I wasn't sure about before visiting. It looked like a Disney World of food, with mock piazzas and vegetable stalls. Yet, as with all such things, if it's pulled off it's highly impressive. And it is. This is more than a supermarket, but more a department store.

    The concept is that the shop stocks and promotes the very best Italian produce. Items are grouped, so you have a preserves section, a fishmonger, meat and cheese counters and so on. The area by the tills is dedicated to row on row of chocolate, tinned items and so on, and heaves with customers. Drinks have a brilliant basement area, with beer in one section, wines in another. There are aisles and aisles of wines grouped by type and region of Italy, and also a particular room for high value wines.

    Of what I have tried, I can confirm the standard is high and you can trust the products here. The downside - unsurprisingly - is that it is not cheap. Sadly, it wouldn't be somewhere many of us could actually do our weekly shop!

    One of the things I liked is that Eataly is not fanatically rigid. So, for example there is Scottish salmon and beer from around the world, while the focus on Italian cuisine if foremost. The only rule seems to be that the items are of the best of their type.

    There's more than just food and drink: there's an excellent book section and a fantastic selection of cookware, cutlery, etc., too. Then there are the dining areas themselves, each based around a particular type of product (seafood, meats, icecream, pizza - and more). However, there's too much to go into on that subject here! I have written a review on the pizza and pasta place, and hope to add more as every option looked delicious.

    The first trip of many!

    What to buy: Local wine, chocolate, truffles, pasta. These are the edible products most associated with Turin and the surrounding area.

    What to pay: Eataly is not cheap - the sky's the limit! I spent EUR 3.30 on a Venchi chocolate bar, for example.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Wine Tasting
    • Beer Tasting

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    Farmers' Markets

    by ant1606 Updated Apr 11, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Most popular in town, and centrally located, are the following:

    "Oasi di prodotti tipici della campagna piemontese" (Typical Piedmontese food products)
    When: 1st Sunday of every month (except Jan, Jul, Aug)
    Where: Piazza Palazzo di Citta' (City Hall)

    "Oasi di prodotti tipici della campagna piemontese" (Typical Piedmontese food products)
    When: 3rd Sunday of every month (except Jul, Aug, Dec)
    Where: Piazza Madama Cristina

    “Oltremercato: prodotti biologici, naturali e ecocompatibili” (Biological food products)
    When: 4th Saturday of every month (except Jul, Aug)
    Where: Piazza Palazzo di Citta' (City Hall)

    “Noibio: prodotti biologici” (Biological food products)
    When: 1st Sunday of every month (except Aug, Dec)
    Where: Piazza Madama Cristina

    What to buy: Other than regular street markets around town, which are operated daily, Farmers' markets are special events and the best option for sourcing excellent seasonal food products.
    Local, fresh and reasonably priced vegetables, fruit, cheese, salame and the like, bread, honey and much more.

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    SPACCIO - Robe di Kappa: Made in Torino

    by ant1606 Written Oct 8, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    RdK Logo

    Iconic brand name born and raised in Torino, Robe di Kappa has placed its logo onto the jerseys of a great number of domestic and foreign sports teams. Production had long been moved abroad but part of the former city manufacturing plant was dedicated to the "Spaccio" (it means "outlet"), where RdK and other brands collections can be found at interesting prices. This includes "Superga", the omnipresent canvas shoes around the feet of Italians during the 70s and the 80s.
    Net really "Made in Torino" anymore but surely the brand is, as well as the company headquarters sitting in the same downtown building.
    A visit can also be a pleasant occasion to experience the "Fratelli la Cozza" restaurant, just next door and part of the same building complex. Excellent food including one among the best pizza in town in a uniquely fancy and relaxed atmosphere.

    What to buy: Casual and sports clothing, footwear.

    What to pay: Outlet price tags.

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    Street Markets

    by ant1606 Written Mar 7, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are several street markets in town, largest and most famous being historical Porta Palazzo (see my other "Balon" tip).
    A large one takes place in Corso Svizzera and Corso Racconigi, namely the second largest in town. Those strolling in Via Garibaldi will cross Corso Valdocco and its market. Info here:
    http://www.regione.piemonte.it/cgi-bin/commercio/mercati/dynIndex.pl

    I'd mention and suggest the Crocetta market, which is the trendy spot in town for apparel, clothing, shoes and accessories - brand names and the like.
    Info here (Italian language):
    http://www.mercatocrocettatorino.it/dove_siamo.htm

    Street markets are crowded places and it's always advisable to keep valuables properly tucked away.

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    Sporting Goods

    by ant1606 Updated Dec 3, 2009

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    One of the largest selection of sporting goods and apparel in town is Decathlon, a French franchise specialized in most sports as a one-stop store. They offer a variety of brands although most items are branded under the Decathlon group. Two stores in town, one located in Grugliasco and the other in Moncalieri.

    For a wider selection of mountaineering equipment - except for ski - my favorite store is Ronco Alpinismo in Corso Montegrappa 31, Torino.

    Decathlon website
    Ronco Alpinismo website

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    "Balon"

    by ant1606 Written Sep 15, 2009

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    Porta Palazzo is the largest open-street market in Europe. Located at the intersection of Corso Regina Margherita and Via Milano, its name originates from the adjacent Porta Palatina. Some see it as a place to be avoided for crowded areas can be fertile ground to certain illegal activities and black market, let alone pickpocketing. Every Turinese knows that here is where it was possible to find anything - really, anything - if you'd ask the right person. For example, I know of a man who worked in the Soviet Union and used to buy smuggled rubles here.
    Present-day shopping centers and large grocery stores have changed the habits of the citizens but many still like to shop for food in this market and walk around with bags. Chances of finding a parking place nearby are next to zero.
    North of the square unfold Via Goffredo Mameli and Via Borgo Dora, the "Balon" area. Here is where every Saturday and every second Sunday of the month - except for August - a flea-market is held. I admit it has gradually lost the flavor and ambience of the past to more drab values, today it's rather unlikely to find real (vs. fake) antique stuff or the bargain versus the scam. It might not be advisable to buy "valuable" pieces but still it could be interesting to take a sightseeing tour.
    "Balon" (pronounced "bah-loong") is the Piedmontese for "ball' and the name derives from an ancient court ball game which survived and is still popular in a small area of southern Piedmont.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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    The Baratti & Milano shop: Souvenirs from Turin's famous cafe

    by BlueLlama Updated Feb 16, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Baratti & Milano storefront

    The shop is essentially an area off from Baratti & Milano's main cafe area where the till is. As with the cafe, the elegant old features of the building have been retained. The stock is essentially chocolate in various forms. You can buy sachets of the famous hot chocolate, which, having now tried it, I can recommend as being far superior to the usual powdered chocolate on sale. In fact, it does seem to be the same as what is served in the cafe.

    A good small gift is an individual bar of chocolate - there are the usual milk, dark and white varieties as well as a gianduja (praline-based) bar. The latter is gorgeous! Then there are 'degustazione'-type sets with different types of chocolate to try.

    The items are stylishly packaged and can be gift-wrapped, making them perfect gifts to take home. I had enjoyed my trip to the cafe so much that I wanted to take a bit of it back with me and I have to say that the hot chocolate transported me to Turin instantly!

    What to pay: Hot chocolate and individual bars start at EUR 2.50.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

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    Il Grifone: Interesting designer discount store

    by BlueLlama Updated Feb 3, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Il Grifone is a series of small shops selling heavily discounted clothes and shoes from a range of Italian designers and well-known brands. Located in an arcade in Turin, there is a shop each for women's clothing, men's and shoes/leatherware. It's this last that I've found the best buys.

    The shop's a bit of a treasure trove and you're never sure what you'll find: sometimes there will be any number of gorgeous handbags, another time the bags will be awful but there'll be fantastic deals on jeans. I've been and left empty-handed, and I've also been and spent a small fortune. But if you plan on any clothes shopping, it's worth a visit. Speaking as someone who usually hates sales and outlets, this is high praise!

    I'm not so keen on the clothes shops (though the range of jeans is extensive), but the shoe shop is very good. You can get exclusive Italian shoe brands like Pantofola d'Oro for a fraction of the price in other shops. There is also a shop for children's clothing.

    The discounts themselves can be amazing: Balenciaga, etc, bags halved in price and then halved again.

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    Libreria Luxemburg: Good independent bookshop

    by BlueLlama Updated Jan 15, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Libreria Luxembourg

    I spent many a happy hour browsing the books in this shop when I lived in Italy. Although it's not very big, Libreria Luxemburg is very well stocked. Upstairs live the foreign language books, English being the main language represented, although they also seem to specialise in Russian books. Spanish, French and German too. You can tell a lot of thought has gone into stocking too: there is everything from poetry and plays to Harry Potter to books about Turin in English and novels.

    Downstairs is for Italian-language books. Again, there is an interesting choice (foreign poetry in bilingual editions) as well as the staples. Luxemburg has a special section of Jewish-interest books, which marks it out for anyone with an interest in the subject. You can tell this is a shop run by and for bibliophiles which makes it rather special. According to the website, it's also Turin's oldest bookshop, dating back to the 19th century.

    What to pay: Books in Italy are dearer than in the UK and US but comparable to other European countries.

    Buy guidebooks in English. Translations are usually more out-of-date and expensive. Luxemburg sells both English and Italian editions of Rough Guide, etc.

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    Street shopping

    by ant1606 Updated Jan 2, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Main streets around Piazza Castello

    Typical shopping district is downtown. The streets of Via Roma, Piazza Castello and Via Po can be walked up and down on both sides under arches, hence even in bad weather. Via Lagrange and some streets east of Via Roma are good spots too if high-end prices are sought after.
    Lower prices and abundance of merchandise are in pedestrian Via Garibaldi, which heads north-east from Piazza Castello. Exceeding one kilometer in length (.66 mi) it's the longest pedestrian stretch in Europe.

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  • Q3 - Piattaforma per giovani stilisti: Made by european young designers

    by special-j Written Oct 2, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It is one of the most special shops in Turin. Very small an hidden, but with the wonderful message that in Italy exist also the young unkown fashion designer and not just the usual names. The shop is run by a really nice girl from Berlin and she has always some time to have a little talk.

    What to buy: Every item is special! Because every single piece is unique and is made in Europe. You find this tipe of store just in Turin!

    What to pay: Well, the prices are for everybody. You'll find the coinpurse for 25€ and the coat for 399€. The general prices are around a 100€.

    Related to:
    • Work Abroad
    • Singles
    • Arts and Culture

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    1PC4U: Central Internet Cafe

    by Jetgirly Updated Oct 25, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1PC4U is the most central internet cafe in Torino, with the lowest prices and most computers. Rates from EUR 2 per hour (I have seen EUR 6 per hour at other places!). They can burn your holiday pics onto a CD, etc. English is spoken.

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    Juventus: Juventus products

    by Mikebond Written Jul 27, 2006

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    Juventus shop
    1 more image

    What to buy: If you are a fan of Juventus, you can buy many products in several shops. These photos should refer to the official shop in Corso Grande, but I'm not sure. You can also buy these goods from the website below.

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    Decathlon: Sporting goods

    by caldarrosta Updated Jan 31, 2006

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    decathlon

    This is the biggest sports shop you can find in Turin.
    It's just ten meters off the city.
    It's located in Moncalieri.

    If you want to play ping pong there are 2 table just outside, u only need to drop your ID at the info desk and they give you raquets and the little ball to play, u can stay as long as u like!

    Monday:
    h.14.00 to h.20.00
    Tue till Sat
    h.9.00 to h.20.00

    What to pay: It's cheap,
    Tent sold from Eur 30.00
    Bicycle from Eur 90.00

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    Via Garibaldi: Europe's Longest Pedestrian Throughfare

    by Jetgirly Updated Jul 25, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Via Garibaldi

    Don't miss Via Garibaldi, the longest pedestrian throughfare in Europe. It is lined with interesting shops, including the Juventus (football team) official store, cute shoe stores and funky clothes stores. Very trendy and affordable, although sometimes the quality is lacking. Access Via Garibaldi from Piazza Castello, at the opposite end is Piazza Statuto.

    What to buy: Shoes, leather goods, etc.

    What to pay: This street is much less expensive than Via Roma.

    Related to:
    • Singles
    • Study Abroad
    • Budget Travel

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