Torino Shopping

  • Baratti & Milano storefront
    Baratti & Milano storefront
    by BlueLlama
  • Libreria Luxembourg
    Libreria Luxembourg
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  • Fresh produce at Eataly Turin
    Fresh produce at Eataly Turin
    by BlueLlama

Best Rated Shopping in Torino

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    Farmers' Markets

    by ant1606 Updated Apr 11, 2011

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    Most popular in town, and centrally located, are the following:

    "Oasi di prodotti tipici della campagna piemontese" (Typical Piedmontese food products)
    When: 1st Sunday of every month (except Jan, Jul, Aug)
    Where: Piazza Palazzo di Citta' (City Hall)

    "Oasi di prodotti tipici della campagna piemontese" (Typical Piedmontese food products)
    When: 3rd Sunday of every month (except Jul, Aug, Dec)
    Where: Piazza Madama Cristina

    “Oltremercato: prodotti biologici, naturali e ecocompatibili” (Biological food products)
    When: 4th Saturday of every month (except Jul, Aug)
    Where: Piazza Palazzo di Citta' (City Hall)

    “Noibio: prodotti biologici” (Biological food products)
    When: 1st Sunday of every month (except Aug, Dec)
    Where: Piazza Madama Cristina

    What to buy: Other than regular street markets around town, which are operated daily, Farmers' markets are special events and the best option for sourcing excellent seasonal food products.
    Local, fresh and reasonably priced vegetables, fruit, cheese, salame and the like, bread, honey and much more.

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    SPACCIO - Robe di Kappa: Made in Torino

    by ant1606 Written Oct 8, 2010

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    RdK Logo

    Iconic brand name born and raised in Torino, Robe di Kappa has placed its logo onto the jerseys of a great number of domestic and foreign sports teams. Production had long been moved abroad but part of the former city manufacturing plant was dedicated to the "Spaccio" (it means "outlet"), where RdK and other brands collections can be found at interesting prices. This includes "Superga", the omnipresent canvas shoes around the feet of Italians during the 70s and the 80s.
    Net really "Made in Torino" anymore but surely the brand is, as well as the company headquarters sitting in the same downtown building.
    A visit can also be a pleasant occasion to experience the "Fratelli la Cozza" restaurant, just next door and part of the same building complex. Excellent food including one among the best pizza in town in a uniquely fancy and relaxed atmosphere.

    What to buy: Casual and sports clothing, footwear.

    What to pay: Outlet price tags.

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    "Balon"

    by ant1606 Written Sep 15, 2009

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    Porta Palazzo is the largest open-street market in Europe. Located at the intersection of Corso Regina Margherita and Via Milano, its name originates from the adjacent Porta Palatina. Some see it as a place to be avoided for crowded areas can be fertile ground to certain illegal activities and black market, let alone pickpocketing. Every Turinese knows that here is where it was possible to find anything - really, anything - if you'd ask the right person. For example, I know of a man who worked in the Soviet Union and used to buy smuggled rubles here.
    Present-day shopping centers and large grocery stores have changed the habits of the citizens but many still like to shop for food in this market and walk around with bags. Chances of finding a parking place nearby are next to zero.
    North of the square unfold Via Goffredo Mameli and Via Borgo Dora, the "Balon" area. Here is where every Saturday and every second Sunday of the month - except for August - a flea-market is held. I admit it has gradually lost the flavor and ambience of the past to more drab values, today it's rather unlikely to find real (vs. fake) antique stuff or the bargain versus the scam. It might not be advisable to buy "valuable" pieces but still it could be interesting to take a sightseeing tour.
    "Balon" (pronounced "bah-loong") is the Piedmontese for "ball' and the name derives from an ancient court ball game which survived and is still popular in a small area of southern Piedmont.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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    Sporting Goods

    by ant1606 Updated Dec 3, 2009

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    One of the largest selection of sporting goods and apparel in town is Decathlon, a French franchise specialized in most sports as a one-stop store. They offer a variety of brands although most items are branded under the Decathlon group. Two stores in town, one located in Grugliasco and the other in Moncalieri.

    For a wider selection of mountaineering equipment - except for ski - my favorite store is Ronco Alpinismo in Corso Montegrappa 31, Torino.

    Decathlon website
    Ronco Alpinismo website

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    Street Markets

    by ant1606 Written Mar 7, 2010

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    There are several street markets in town, largest and most famous being historical Porta Palazzo (see my other "Balon" tip).
    A large one takes place in Corso Svizzera and Corso Racconigi, namely the second largest in town. Those strolling in Via Garibaldi will cross Corso Valdocco and its market. Info here:
    http://www.regione.piemonte.it/cgi-bin/commercio/mercati/dynIndex.pl

    I'd mention and suggest the Crocetta market, which is the trendy spot in town for apparel, clothing, shoes and accessories - brand names and the like.
    Info here (Italian language):
    http://www.mercatocrocettatorino.it/dove_siamo.htm

    Street markets are crowded places and it's always advisable to keep valuables properly tucked away.

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    Eataly Turin Lingotto: Food and drink shopping taken to a new level

    by BlueLlama Updated Jan 3, 2014
    Fresh produce at Eataly Turin
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    Forget Harrods, this is what my vision of grocery shopping heaven looks like. Imagine if the fresh vegetables on sale were the very best examples of their type, if an unbelievable selection of cheeses, meats and seafood was piled high, if the bakery dished out only freshly made perfectly flavoursome bread, if there was every type of condiment, chocolate and dried goods available in mind-boggling variety... And of course a wonderful selection of drinks.

    This is Eataly Turin. A place I wasn't sure about before visiting. It looked like a Disney World of food, with mock piazzas and vegetable stalls. Yet, as with all such things, if it's pulled off it's highly impressive. And it is. This is more than a supermarket, but more a department store.

    The concept is that the shop stocks and promotes the very best Italian produce. Items are grouped, so you have a preserves section, a fishmonger, meat and cheese counters and so on. The area by the tills is dedicated to row on row of chocolate, tinned items and so on, and heaves with customers. Drinks have a brilliant basement area, with beer in one section, wines in another. There are aisles and aisles of wines grouped by type and region of Italy, and also a particular room for high value wines.

    Of what I have tried, I can confirm the standard is high and you can trust the products here. The downside - unsurprisingly - is that it is not cheap. Sadly, it wouldn't be somewhere many of us could actually do our weekly shop!

    One of the things I liked is that Eataly is not fanatically rigid. So, for example there is Scottish salmon and beer from around the world, while the focus on Italian cuisine if foremost. The only rule seems to be that the items are of the best of their type.

    There's more than just food and drink: there's an excellent book section and a fantastic selection of cookware, cutlery, etc., too. Then there are the dining areas themselves, each based around a particular type of product (seafood, meats, icecream, pizza - and more). However, there's too much to go into on that subject here! I have written a review on the pizza and pasta place, and hope to add more as every option looked delicious.

    The first trip of many!

    What to buy: Local wine, chocolate, truffles, pasta. These are the edible products most associated with Turin and the surrounding area.

    What to pay: Eataly is not cheap - the sky's the limit! I spent EUR 3.30 on a Venchi chocolate bar, for example.

    Related to:
    • Wine Tasting
    • Food and Dining
    • Beer Tasting

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    Via Garibaldi

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 18, 2005

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    This predestrian street runs from Piazza Castello and is one of the longest shooping streets in Europe. It contains many small clothes shops and boutiques.

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