Architecture (Neo Classic and Baroque), Torino

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  • Statue of the Duke of Savoy, San Carlo Square
    Statue of the Duke of Savoy, San Carlo...
    by vichatherly
  • Piazza San Carlo
    Piazza San Carlo
    by sylina
  • the famous cafeteria Baratti & Milano
    the famous cafeteria Baratti & Milano
    by sylina
  • sylina's Profile Photo

    Galleria Subalpina

    by sylina Written Apr 1, 2008

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    Galleria Subalpina
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    You will find this charming galleria under the arches of Piazza Castello. The glass roof was remained as originally when it was built.. fine restaurants and cafeterias in it.. it was nice to walk around... even when it's raining.. :)

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    Piazza Castello

    by sylina Updated Apr 1, 2008

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    Piazza Castello
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    Walked from Piazza Vittorio through Via Po, you will reach Piazza Castello. One of the most charming squares in Torino where Palazzo Madama locates.. The official tourist information center is around the corner of Via Garibaldi.. The street itself is a nice place in terms of shopping.. Via Roma is also connected to this square where you can find many shops.

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    Piazza San Carlo

    by sylina Written Apr 1, 2008

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    Piazza San Carlo
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    "Piazza San Carlo is a long parade of a square headed by two churches at one end and consisting of a row of arcades along each of the long sides.

    The piazza is is home to the "Caval 'd Brons", a bronze statue of Emanuele Filiberto in the centre, while a variety of shops, cafés and restaurants shelter behind the cooling arcades. The famous Caffé Ristorante Torino is here as is Ristorante Caval 'd Brons.

    The square was in a turmoil before the Olympics while construction work was going on to build an underground car park, but now that peace has been restored. Piazza San Carlo has regained its imperial grandeur as well as the tranquility for which it is famed.

    Piazza San Carlo was designed by Carlo di Castellamonte in the mid 17th century, with "El Caval 'd Brons" sculpted by Carlo Marocchetti in 1838. Open at one end, the square is topped by the churches of San Carlo and Santa Cristina on the southern side and the Palazzo Solaro del Borgo on the east is the central office of the Whist Club founded by Cavour."

    ---- from http://www.bella-torino.com/piazza-san-carlo-turin.html

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    The Medieval Castle

    by sylina Written Mar 26, 2008

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    Medieval castle
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    It located in Valentino park... not too big.. no crowd when I visited there... There are couple souvenir shops in the village with incredibly reasonable prices.. After all.. it worths a visit.. :) I heard in summer, there will be some music festival performance in the village.. would be nice to see..

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    PIAZZA S. Carlo

    by draguza Written Oct 12, 2006

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    Me in piazza San Carlo

    Piazza San Carlo was designed by Carlo di Castellamonte in 1642 and completed in 1650. In the middle of the piazza you’ll find the equestrian statue of Emanuele Filiberto (known to all as “El Caval èd brons”), sculpted by Carlo Marocchetti in 1838. The porticoed buildings surrounding the piazza give space to numerous bars, cafes, and restaurants (such as the famous Caval èd brons, San Carlo, Torino, Stratta), emporiums (such as Paissa), and boutiques (such as Olympic). On the southern side of the piazza stand the two so-called twin churches: San Carlo and Santa Cristina. Palazzo Solaro del Borgo, which occupies the Eastern side of the piazza, was reconstructed in 1737 and is now the central office of “il Circolo del Whist” (the Whist Club), founded by Cavour. The well-to-do people of Turin love this piazza, even though via Roma crosses it and thus fills it with cars (moving and parked). The City government is considering building an overpass for cars and making the piazza a pedestrian zone

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    Sanctuary of Piazza della Consolata

    by draguza Written Oct 12, 2006

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    Santa Consolata church

    From Piazza Emanuele Filiberto you come to Piazza della Consolata, where there is the homonym Sanctuary, built by Guarino Guarini and Filippo Juvarra.

    Opposite to the church you can have a pleasant break in the historical coffee "Al Bicerin": here some time ago was born the very good hot ponce called "Bicerin", made out of coffee, chocolate and cream offered in a small glass, the "bicerin".

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    Piazza Castello

    by draguza Updated Oct 12, 2006

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    Piazza Castello

    Piazza Castello is quite simply the heart of Turin. It is both a symbol of historic greatness and one of the well-being of the city today. At the end of the 16th Century Carlo Emmanuele I commissioned architect Ascanio Vitozzi to design the piazza. At the center: Palazzo Madama; surrounding it: the Palazzo Reale, the Prefettura, and the Armeria Reale, the Teatro Regio, and the porticos and their shops (including historical café’s Baratti and Mulassano. The main streets of the city depart from here: via Po, via Roma, via Garibaldi.

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    Porta Palatina

    by draguza Updated Oct 12, 2006

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    Me at Castle
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    It was the gateway to the Roman city from the north. In Piazza Cesare Augusto stands the most famous monument from Augusta Taurinum, the city founded by the romans in 28 BC.

    The medieval name (Portae Palatii) of this former "main left gate" now identifies the part of the town that stands adjacent to the monument.

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    Palazzo di città: CITY HALL

    by draguza Written Oct 12, 2006

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    City Hall

    Once known as Piazza delle Erbe for the herbs that were sold here, it's now the square of Turin's City Hall.
    Between 1659 and 1665 the original Palazzo Municipale (City Hall) was demolished and rebuilt by Francesco Lanfranchi, later to be enlarged by Benedetto Alfieri in the eighteenth century.
    Since 1858 the statues of Carlo Alberto and Vittorio Emanuele II have graced the façade. In the centre of the square stands a monument to the Conte Verde, the work of the sculptor Pelagio Pelagi.
    Commmissioned by King Carl Alberto, it represents Amedeus VI of Savoy, known as the Green Count.

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    Piazza Carignano

    by draguza Written Oct 12, 2006

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    Me at Palazzo Carignano

    It's one of the most beautiful spots of Torino. On one side there is Teatro Carignano (1783), flanked by the historic Ristorante del Cambio and Gelateria Pepino.
    On the opposite side, palazzo Carignano.

    Continuing a little further to Via Accademia delle Scienze you can find the Palazzo del Collegio dei Nobili (home of the Egyptian Museum), the Galleria Sabauda and the Accademia delle Scienze.

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    La Galleria Subalpina

    by maritagnes Updated Aug 27, 2006

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    This elegant Galleria - the famous arcade - dates from 1874 (designed by Umberto Carrera) and hosts several traditional and famous attractions, like the caffè Baratti & Milano and the antiquarian bookstore Gilibert.
    Beware that the Galleria closes at night.

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    Chiesa di San Lorenzo

    by Mikebond Updated Jul 27, 2006

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    San Lorenzo
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    On the eve of the Saint Quentin battle, occured on 10th August 1557 (Saint Laurence), Emanuele Filiberto di Savoia, Governor of the Flandres, vowed he would have a beautiful church built in honour of Saint Laurence if he had won the battle. He did win the battle, reconquered the duchy and made Torino the new capital city.
    However, he just restored the church of Santa Maria del Presepio, while works for the construction of the present chiesa di San Lorenzo started only in 1666, lead by architect Guarino Guarini.
    From Piazza Castello, you see the dome, but you can't see one of the most important parts of a church: the façade! Well, San Lorenzo has no façade because Guarini's project was not completed.
    In the presbytery you can see the altar, also by Guarini, that commemorates the duke's vow.

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    Palazzo Madama

    by Mikebond Updated Jul 27, 2006

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    Palazzo Madama
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    The present building of Palazzo Madama has a long history. Originally, it was the Praetorian Gate of Roman Iulia Augusta Taurinorum; it became a castle in the Middle Ages and a royal palace in the 15th century, under Ludovico d'Acaja. "Madama" Marie Christine of France, Louis XIII's sister, chose it as her residence. The attribute "Madama" comes from there.
    The palace was transformed along the 17th century with projects by Ascanio Vittozzi (the façade) and Carlo di Castellammonte (inside). Sicilian architect Filippo Juvarra was charged to restore the palace in 1718, but his work lasted only three years and was limited to the façade and the great staircase. The gallery of Carlo Emanuele 1st used to connect Palazzo Madama to Palazzo Reale, but it was destroyed in 1809 and never rebuilt.
    Since Juvarra's project wasn't achieved, the palace consists today of two parts: the lateral and the back side are medieval (some towers even date of Roman time) stands in contrast with Juvarra's bright neoclassic façade.
    Palazzo Madama hosted many institutions along the history, including the Senate of the Italian Kingdom from 1860 to 1864, when Torino was the first capital city of Italia.
    The palace hosts the Museo civico d'Arte Antica, that I couldn't visit due to restoration works.

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    Statues everywhere

    by vichatherly Updated Jun 14, 2006
    Statue of the Duke of Savoy, San Carlo Square

    Explore the piazzes, look out for all the statues.

    There is some thoery about statues with horses. The supposed theory is all about how the rider died. Different poses if he died in battle or at home in bed etc...sounds interesting

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    Walking under Torino'Arcades

    by matemix Written Apr 12, 2006

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    Via Po arcades

    A real record: with 18 km of arcades, and 12.5 km of them continuous and connected, Torino has the biggest pedestrian area of Europe. With different styles, from the grey stone of via Po to the marble of via Roma, turinese arcades are an unique urbanistic, architectonic, aesthetic and social-economic symbol. It's said that the route of 2 km of arcades from Palazzo Reale to piazza Vittorio Veneto, was requested by King Vittorio Emanuele I di Savoia for his walking. He and his family didn't wet when it was raining or snowing and the arcades are useful especially for this. The first arcade build was the part near via Barbaroux and via Palazzo di Citt?. It was 1615. Today turinese arcades with a lot of shops and meeting place, are a huge sitting-room that no other Italian city has.

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