Sacra Sindone (Holy Shroud), Torino

4 out of 5 stars 13 Reviews

In the church by the Palazzo Royale.

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • copy of shroud on display
    copy of shroud on display
    by alectrevor
  • Duomo e cappella della s Sindone
    Duomo e cappella della s Sindone
    by alectrevor
  • Sacra Sindone (Holy Shroud)
    by Onedragon
  • Onedragon's Profile Photo

    SHROUD OF TURIN

    by Onedragon Updated Nov 5, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    GUIDE EXPLAINING THE HISTORY
    4 more images

    BY SHROUD.ORG The blood man Shroud Turin type and the bloodstain discover on the shroud has been mystery ever since it was discovered. Many believers has defended that the cloth is not a forgery. They believe that the shroud dates from the time of Christ and it of miraculous origin . It is also claimed that the blood man Shroud Turin has an AB blood type.

    Tests were taken out by forensic scientists and chemists on the bloodstain Shroud of Turin and results show positive to those bloodstains were in fact to be created by real blood. Immunologists, fluorescence and spectrographic tests, as well as RH and ABO typing of blood antigens revel that the stains were human blood. Hence, this mean the bloodstains were formed by real human bleeding from real wounds on a real human body that came into direct contact with the cloth.

    The mystery of how the image was left by the corpse of a man who was beaten and crucified still puzzles scientists, believers, historians, and writers till this day.
    Pollen grains

    Researchers of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem reported the presence of pollen grains in the cloth samples, showing species appropriate to the spring in Palestine.

    The Israeli researchers also detected the outlines of various flowering plants on the cloth, which they say would point to March or April and the environs of Jerusalem, based on the species identified. In the forehead area, corresponding to the crown of thorns if the image is genuine, they found traces of Gundelia tournefortii, which is limited to this period of the year in the Jerusalem area. This analysis depends on interpretation of various patterns on the shroud as representing particular plants.
    In 2000
    An archaeologist discovered shroud-wrapped remains in a Jerusalem tomb, and the shroud was dated to the first century. THE SHROUD OF TURIN WAS IN A GLASS CASE AND I GUESS THEY WON'T SHOW IT AGAIN TILL 2025??? OH..WELL! AMAZING NONE THE LESS!!!!

    Was this review helpful?

  • Onedragon's Profile Photo

    SHROUD OF TURIN 2

    by Onedragon Updated Mar 27, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    I WAS SO AMAZED TO FIND SO MANY THINGS ON BOTH SIDES OF THE DEBATE ABOUT THE SHROUD..IT HAS FASCINATED ME AND I ENJOY SEEING AND UNDERSTANDING MORE.
    So precise are some of the features on the Shroud's images that one pundit likened vaporous formation to painting a perfect copy of the Mona Lisa with aerosol spray paint. THIS IS A STATEMENTS FROM ONE OF THE ARTICLES... Other tests carried out by forensic medicine and botany (people who studies plants) found pollens on the cloth. Those pollens are believed to be from plants from the Jerusalem area. As well as this, forensic scientist also found bloodstain on the cloth which implies that the man under the cloth was put to death in the very same way that Jesus was. Although all these point to the direction suggesting it might be Jesus, but our historic records shows that Jesus was not the only person who was crucified in Jerusalem during that time. So again it cannot verify that this is the shroud of Jesus.

    Was this review helpful?

  • ant1606's Profile Photo

    Holy Shroud of Turin

    by ant1606 Updated Dec 27, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Negative image of the Holy Shroud
    1 more image

    The linen commonly defined as the "Holy Shroud of Turin" is undoubtedly interesting aside of the debate around it.
    Some believe it's the cloth that wrapped the body of Jesus Christ, some claim it's absolutely not. Studies have been conducted by using various technologies and the result of such research have led to a "political" result, probably aimed to protect the faith of believers and at the same time assert the physical evidence found therein.
    The Shroud appears to be dating back to the 12th century, although the conclusion is that the full body image, front and back, was left on the linen by the corpse of a crucified man.

    A copy of the linen is displayed inside the Duomo church at all times, while the original is only displayed once every several years.

    Regardless of the age or the origin of this cloth, it's a rare and impressive testimony of the cruel practice of terminating somebody by crucifixion and a horrible public death to be suffered.

    Was this review helpful?

  • The Shroud of Turin and the Duomo

    by Jetgirly Written Apr 30, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Shroud of Turin is housed in a special chapel inside Torino's Duomo. The shroud is put on display extremely rarely (think once every five or ten years), most visitors will have the opportunity to see a full-sized replica. For preservation purposes, the real shroud is laid flat and housed inside a large marble box that is covered with cloth. Admission to the Duomo is free, and there is a small (free) museum attached with movies (in English and Italian, alternating as per the needs of visitors) describing the history of the shroud, exhibits supporting the authenticity of the shroud, and treasures of the church.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mikebond's Profile Photo

    Duomo

    by Mikebond Updated Feb 10, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Duomo
    4 more images

    The Cattedrale, better known as Duomo is certainly neither the most remarkable nor the most beautiful church of the city but it's famous for hosting the Holy Shroud (read more about it in the next tip).
    The church is dedicated to Saint John the Baptist and was built in 1491-98 on a plan by Tuscan architect Meo del Caprino. The campanile di Sant'Andrea ("Saint Andrew's bell tower") looks Romanesque, although it was built in the 15th century.
    The inside of the church is very bright and still in Gothic style.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mikebond's Profile Photo

    Sacra Sindone

    by Mikebond Written Feb 3, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Holy Shroud
    1 more image

    According to Christianism, the Holy Shroud (Sacra Sindone) is the sheet Jesus Christ was folded in after being pulled down from the cross. It was kept in the Palazzo Reale until a fire burst in some of its chambers. The Holy Shroud was damaged a little and now it is kept in the Duomo (the Cathedral). You can only see a transparency of it because it is too fragile to exhibit it. The first photo show the mark of Jesus's face, while the second one depicts the mark of His body.
    Watching the Holy Shroud is quite impressive for a Catholic. I don't know if other Christians give as much importance to it as we do, but I think so.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jeannkelly's Profile Photo

    The Cathedral of San Giovanni Batista

    by Jeannkelly Updated Dec 17, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Inside the Basilica is the famed Holy Shroud of Tu

    The Cathedral of San Giovanni houses the Chapel of the Holy Shroud, one of the mystical and mythical thing of the Catholic Faith.

    The Holy Shroud that you can see (displayed) is actually not the original one as the the original is kept in Chapel of the Holy Shroud in the same cathedral for preservation purposes. What is displayed is the copy of the copy (or the negative of the negative of the original when it was first photographed) which reveals a very clear portrait of the body of Jesus Christ, believed to be how it looked when it was wrapped with the shroud. (According to the volunteer guide, the scientific theorem of negative x negative is positive is the best explaination how this picture of the Holy Shroud )

    What you can see is indeed a thing unexplainable. For the believers, it is nothing but a miracle, for the non-believers, trust me, it is still a thing to ponder, as I did.

    It's worth a visit. Volunteer guides are available to give you some explaination on the Holy Shroud (although in Italian only). Should you wish to know more, you can proceed to the Museum of the Holy Shroud (Museo della Sindone) located at Via San Domenico 28.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • sahel578's Profile Photo

    The Shroud Of Turin

    by sahel578 Written Sep 29, 2005

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The photo on display.. actual size of the shroud
    1 more image

    One thing that I noticed during my Italian holiday was a slight feeling of loss. As a Jew, I have no emotional connection to all of the religious sites. This is not to say that they are not beautiful and historical. I did enjoy seeing the Shroud of Turin, even if it was just a photograph. (They keep the real one in a box away from sunlight) My opinion on this piece is that if its the real thing, thats amazing. But also, if its not, its still amazing that someone had that kind of knowledge to create such a thing so long ago. I think its worth seeing either way.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • caldarrosta's Profile Photo

    Shroud Museum (Museo della Sindone)

    by caldarrosta Updated Jul 4, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It's exposed to the believers every 25 years (you better not miss it).
    If you are really keane on it you can find a museum.
    Guided visits start every half hour and last about an hour.
    Opening hrs 9-12 & 15-19
    Closed on tuesday

    Price: €5.50

    Here is something you might don't know....

    A fire in Turin Cathedral
    Friday, 11th April 1997. At 11.30 p.m. a fire broke out in the interior of the chapel of Guarini. The flames have rapidly reached the nearby Royal Palace.
    The salvage of the Sindon (the ) has been very dangerous, but the sudarium has been put in safety before the eventual collapse of the dome damaged it.
    The causes of the fire are still doubtful.
    The Cardinal Saldarini, keeper of the Holy Sudarium, assures that the ostension in 1998 won't be compromised.

    His name is Mario Trematore. He is the man who saved the Sindon from the flames and from the collapses. When the situation was given up for lost, he dashed amidst the flames and while around him all was collapsing, bursting and burning, with a big iron hammer he began to batter the bullet-proof glass reliquary which protects the relic. He says: "I found the courage in that symbol, the symbol of the Sindon. Only a miracle can explain how I succeeded in breaking the reliquary. When finally all the glass layers gave up and while the beams were falling down, I succeeded in grasping the reliquary with the sudarium in it with both hands and running out with it. Some priests came towards me and everybody burst into tears."
    (www.sindone.org)

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    The Turin Shroud

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 19, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    The most famous - and most dubious - holy relic of them all is kept in Turin's Duomo. The shroud, said to be the winding-sheet in which the body of Christ was wrapped after his crucifixion, owes its fame to the fact that the shroud bears the imprint of a crucified man with a wound in his side and bruises from what might have been a crown of thorns.

    The shroud is one of the most famous medeival relics. Its early history in unclear, but the house of Savoy was in procession of it around 1450 and had it displayed in Guarini's chapel from 1694. The shroud (which sits in a silver air conditioned casket inside an iron box) is not on view, though a replica is together with scientific explanations as to the shroud's possible origins.

    Was this review helpful?

  • LittleWonder's Profile Photo

    The Shroud of Turin, a famous...

    by LittleWonder Written Aug 24, 2002

    0.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Shroud of Turin, a famous holy relic that draws thousands of pilgrims to the city.
    This is supposed to be the shroud Jesus was wrapped in after he had died on the cross.

    Was this review helpful?

  • MVMT's Profile Photo

    The Shroud of Turin is a...

    by MVMT Updated Aug 24, 2002

    0.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Shroud of Turin is a centuries old linen cloth that bears the image of a crucified man. A man that millions believe to be Jesus of Nazareth. Is it really the cloth that wrapped his crucified body, or is it simply a medieval forgery, a hoax perpetrated by some clever artist? Modern, twentieth century science has completed hundreds of thousands of hours of detailed study and intense research on the Shroud. It is, in fact, the single most studied artifact in human history, and we know more about it today than we ever have before. And yet, the controversy still rages. I believe that if you have access to the facts, you can make up your own mind about the Shroud...

    Was this review helpful?

  • alectrevor's Profile Photo

    Holy shroud of Turin.

    by alectrevor Written May 18, 2007
    copy of shroud on display
    1 more image

    The holy shroud is kept safe in a casket in the chapel of the Holy Shroud in Turin cathedral next to the Palazzo Royale. A photo copy is on display in the church. Admission is free.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Torino

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

81 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Sacra Sindone (Holy Shroud)
4.0 out of 5 stars
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.5 out of 5 stars
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
1 Review
0.4 miles away
Show Prices

View all Torino hotels