Torino Transportation

  • Transportation
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  • Transportation
    by bonio
  • Transportation
    by bonio

Most Recent Transportation in Torino

  • ant1606's Profile Photo

    Parking

    by ant1606 Updated Jun 8, 2012

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    Not only parking is scarce most anywhere in town, it's also expensive. Except for a few public underground spots, parking in Torino means finding a place on the streets. Closer to the city center, blue painted lines require an hourly fee in between 8:00 AM and 7:30 PM, no fee on Sundays and certain holidays. In the past few years the city had lifted the parking fee for the whole month of August but this is not a consolidated rule. Locating a ticketing machine isn't always easy as they're not always as close as one would expect. These machines only accept coins so be prepared. Pay for as much as you need and place the receipt on the dashboard in a visible place. An alternate option is to purchase daily, weekly, monthly or yearly parking coupons which are sold at newspapers and tobacco stores.
    Not much for the parking fees but what I don't like is the fact that, despite paying, one still has to deal with Lady Luck to find a spot. It's an unnerving practice and my personal solution is to move around on two-wheelers. Bicycle if I don't have to leave it alone (potential theft problem) or motorcycle for other cases. Local police close an eye for motorcycles parked on sidewalks and some other namely forbidden places, provided the vehicle doesn't impede passages or circulation. Same for bicycles and most every post has one or more bikes chained to it.

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    Cycling in Torino

    by ant1606 Updated Jun 8, 2012

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    Torino - Cycling Paths

    After years of debate and pressure form citizens and organizations, a lot has been done in town to ease the discomfort and dangerous situations encountered by those who cycle around. Torino has become the most cycle-friendly large town in Italy and, although a lot more can be done - the dedicated cycling paths are currently being expanded - the city can now count on a decent network. The yearly average precipitation amount of some 1,300 mm (52 in), not much, encourages leisure biking for all and commuting sees an increasing popularity especially throughout traffic-banned downtown areas.
    In addition to the TObike (bike sharing program), the City Council has bikes for rent at disposal for a fair rate at a few locations in town (inside city parks).

    Printed network and other city maps are available for free at any information center in town.
    DOWNLOAD the cycling paths network map.

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    • Cycling

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  • white_smallstar's Profile Photo

    Renting buses

    by white_smallstar Written Apr 14, 2012

    Hi
    I have never used this kind of service so the links below are only the result of my research surfing the net.
    Sorry, two of them are not in English

    http://www.vigobus.it/eng/noleggio_bus_eng.php

    http://www.comune.torino.it/gtt/noleggio/
    http://www.comune.torino.it/gtt/turismo/pdf/flotta_noleggio_gtt.pdf

    http://www.noleggioautobus.com/noleggio_autobus_torino.asp

    Good luck!

    *Nico*

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  • ant1606's Profile Photo

    Bike Pride

    by ant1606 Updated Jul 13, 2011
    Torino Bike Pride
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    Two-wheeler awareness, and presence to stimulate the city administrators, find common ground through the Bike Pride event. Some 5,000 cyclists gathered for the 2010 and 2011 editions in the Parco del Valentino. Food, music and plenty of good company before and after the parade through the city streets.
    Early June is the typical timing for this yearly event, but the 2011 edition was postponed to July 10 due to bad weather.
    One more bike means one less car :)

    Torino Bike Pride

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    • Arts and Culture
    • Cycling

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  • ant1606's Profile Photo

    Giretto d'Italia

    by ant1606 Written May 23, 2011

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    And the winner is....Torino!

    On May 3rd, 2011, the Ministry of the Environment sponsored the "Giretto d'Italia". Not a real competition but rather a survey in 27 participating cities falling into three categories - large, medium and small cities. Commuting cyclists were counted through checkpoints in between 8,30 and 9,30 AM and Torino scored the highest count among large competing cities.

    If interested, click here for results

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    • Cycling

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  • sylina's Profile Photo

    tren station

    by sylina Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    You can book ticket online.. the tren ticket in Italy is comparatively cheaper than Germany. We took train to visit Milano, Venezia and Genoa.. it was convenient..

    Remember to print the ticket before getting on the train.. you will find the machine on the platform.. the train attendant will check the ticket during the trip...

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  • marco2005's Profile Photo

    Eurostar Alta Velocita'

    by marco2005 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    From 10th February new Eurostar High Velocity line between Milan and Turin.
    (actually the high speed line is just for 2/3 of the distance) 1h 27'

    Till 31th March the price is the same of a "normal" Eurostar 15euro 2nd calss and 20 euro 1st class..

    In the olympic period (10-26 february) 50% off if you have a ticket for an olympic event.

    The schedule of the new fast Eurostar is:
    Milan 08:13 - Turin 09:40
    Milan 08:13 - Turin 09:40
    Turin 12:20 - Milan 13:47
    Turin 18:20 - Milan 19:47

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  • Mikebond's Profile Photo

    By train

    by Mikebond Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    mountains from the train
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    It is relatively easy to get to Torino by train. Eurostar Italia, Intercity and regional trains connect the city of the Mole to Milano, Venezia, Trieste, Bologna, Roma and cities of Southern Italia. Many local railways connect Torino to the other main towns of Piemonte and there are also three Eurocity trains to Paris.
    There were more direct trains to Torino until December 2005, when the new timetable entered into force: direct interregional trains (like the one I took from Bologna) have been eliminated and partly replaced with Intercity trains. Many travellers were unhappy with Trenitalia, the Italian railway operator, and the involved regions (Piemonte, Lombardia, Emilia Romagna and Liguria) are negotiating to get a better timetable. The interregional trains between Bologna and Torino have been re-introduced in September 2006.
    The new high-speed line between Torino and Novara, a part of the Torino-Milano connection and of the trans-european corridor nr. 6 Lyon-Torino-Milano-Venezia-Trieste-Ljubljana Budapest, went into service on 10th February 2006, on the occasion of the beginning of the Winter Olympics.
    GTT, the operator of the local transport of Torino, also run some railway lines (you can see a map here), including one to the Caselle Airport.
    I took these pictures while travelling on the Bologna-Torino train.

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    • Trains

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  • caldarrosta's Profile Photo

    Get around in Turin

    by caldarrosta Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Torino's

    In Italy, and as well Turin you don't buy tickets for the bus aboard. You need to have your ticket before getting on the bus.
    You can buy it in some bars, tabaccherie or newagent. If you need to take the bus on suday be sure you buy the ticket a day before, because a lot of shops are closed and if you are not in the city center it could be a problem.

    If you want to know what time is coming the bus, write a sms to 0039 339-9949990 with the number of the bus stop (you find it on the post)

    http://www.5t.torino.it/5t/en/percorsi
    This is an internet site form the Bus company in Turin, you can write in there where u need to go and where are you and it tells you how to get there!!!!
    Incredible, it works good, even though made by Italians :-)

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  • Getting around Turin

    by stephenshephard Updated Apr 4, 2011
    Turin tram

    Turin has a an extensive tram network. So extensive that it can be quite difficult to work out which trams you need to use and where you should change. There are maps at major tram stops and also available for download at the website linked here (go to the download section).

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  • ant1606's Profile Photo

    From/To the Airport

    by ant1606 Written Mar 11, 2011

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    Train Line

    Easy train connection from/to the Caselle (Sandro Pertini) city airport.
    As of today, one-way fare is 3.40 Euro. Tickets can be bought at newspaper or tobacco (large "T" signs) stores. Such ticket includes access to urban buses and trams, provided that last bus or tram is boarded (ticket must be punched again) within 70 minutes from the initial punch time.

    Part of the Torino-Ceres train line, the terminal is Torino Dora station which is not too far from Piazza Statuto.

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    How far from here?

    by ant1606 Updated Feb 21, 2011

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    Distances from city center: 10, 25, 50 and 100 Km

    Torino is perfectly located at the center of a relatively small territory where treasures abound in every direction. Circles in this image are centered in Piazza Castello and have a radius of 10, 25, 50 and 100 Km (6, 15, 31 and 62 mi respectively), and can help determining what can be done in a day if choosing your soles, bicycle tires or a car's wheels and public transportation.

    The small, inner green circle (10 Km radius) encompasses the whole city of Torino and a good portion of its hill, and touches a couple of Royal residences while being just short of the city airport.
    Next red circle spans from the Avigliana Lakes to the gentle hills of the Monferrato area.
    One more notch - blue - waves at the French border and the Gran Paradiso National Park on one side and truffles and wineland to the other.
    The 100-Km radius circle extends from the highest peak in Europe to the Mediterranean Sea, Lago Maggiore, Aosta Valley region, Switzerland and over 80% of all Piedmontese valleys.

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  • ant1606's Profile Photo

    [TO]BIKE

    by ant1606 Updated Jan 24, 2011

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    Bike sharing - [TO]BIKE
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    The bike sharing service was introduced in town on June 6, 2010.
    Registered users can take and drop a bike at any automated station, 24 hours a day. The total planned number of these is 116, and, despite not all of these have been opened yet, the existing provide a reasonable network for roaming the city center.
    Registration costs:
    Year-round card: 25 Euro (it includes 5 Euro of pre-paid credit)
    Weekly card: 8 Euro (it includes 3 Euro of pre-paid credit)
    Daily card: 5 Euro (it includes 3 Euro of credit)
    Usage price:
    First 30 minutes: free Each subsequent 30-minute fraction have these prces:
    31-60 minutes: 1 Euro
    61-90 minutes: 2 Euro
    91-120 minutes: 3 Euro
    Each subsequent fraction: 3 Euro (max rental time is 4 hours)
    LIMITATIONS:
    Bikes can't be kept for more than 4 hours per day.
    Bikes can't be taken outside the city limits.

    Given the number of active stations, and from personal experience, each usage will hardly exceed 30 minutes. Should it take up to one hour, the price to pay is just 1 Euro.
    For info, registration and activation:
    www.tobke.it

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    • Cycling

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  • ant1606's Profile Photo

    Torino - Downtown traffic limitations

    by ant1606 Updated Oct 8, 2010

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    UPDATE:
    As of May 31st 2010, the City of Torino extends the ZTL area which boundaries become those of the former ZTL Ambientale. As far as I understand, no-entry hours from 7:30AM through 10:30AM except for special permission holders in the green (and brown) area of the map in the photo.

    Regulators of the City of Torino have put in place a plan to reduce motor vehicles pollutants. Kind of questionable though how effective it can be.
    Two areas in downtown Torino were designated for such plan, these are named ZTL ("Zona a Traffico Limitato" or Limited Traffic Area) and ZTL Ambientale (Environmental). The latter has a greater extent and even locals have interpretation difficulties for rules, days and hours for motor traffic bans. It's something that also has to do with the vehicle category. Not just type, but also the emissions classification it falls into accordingly with the year of production.
    Should you drive or ride in town, unless it's a zero-emission vehicle, be aware that you might be able or not to enter the greater environmental ZTL - green color in the map - while the core ZTL is only allowed to public vehicles or special permit holders at all time. A camera system is in place at every point of entry of such area and offenders are fined.
    In any case, be also aware that downtown parking availability is extremely scarce and expensive.

    Decent map clarity, hours and updated general information are available through the links herebelow.

    www.comune.torino.it/canaleambiente

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  • bonio's Profile Photo

    To /from Airport

    by bonio Written Mar 25, 2010

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    The quickest and most direct way into the centre, by public transport, appeared to be the Sadem bus. From the arrivals terminal to Porta Susa railway station. Cost (2/10) was 5.50 Euro, buy your ticket from the cafes nearby - none sold on the buses and don't forget to validate it when you get on.
    Another possibile way into town is to use the local GTT services, this is a little cheaper (3.40) but will involve several changes to reach the centre, any trains are few and far between to Porta Dora station.

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