Piazza Armerina Things to Do

  • remains of the Villa Casale
    remains of the Villa Casale
    by croisbeauty
  • Things to Do
    by croisbeauty
  • Things to Do
    by croisbeauty

Most Recent Things to Do in Piazza Armerina

  • dutchboycalledjan's Profile Photo

    Large Part CLOSED, Villa Romana Del Casale

    by dutchboycalledjan Updated Jun 1, 2010
    Not the bikini girls
    1 more image

    We visited the villa expecting to see the famous mosaics. The entrance fee was only euro 3, which was lower than we expected. But we soon learned that the largest part of the villa is being redone and that only a small part of the mosaics are on display. The villa has been closed, we were told, but is now partly open to public.

    What can be seen is good, but not as impressive as the brochures and the sites promise. When you've travelled over 2 hours, this is disappointing. So first check the availability of the mosaics on the web site: "Il percorso di visita e' subordinato ai lavori di restauro in corso".

    Related to:
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • tim76's Profile Photo

    Villa Romana: Sala delle Dieci Ragazze in Bikini

    by tim76 Updated Oct 22, 2009

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Arguably the most famous mosaic in the villa shows ten girls playing games in what look like bikini's. In the left bottom corner a girl wearing a toga offers a crown and a palm branch to one of the other girls.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • tim76's Profile Photo

    Villa Romana del Casale

    by tim76 Updated Oct 17, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Triclinium
    4 more images

    This villa has one of the largest collections of Roman mosaics in the world. If you have only the slightest interest in Roman times, this UNESCO site is not to be missed.
    The villa was built around 300 AD, maybe for Emperor Marcus Valerius Maximianus. It probably was the centre of an agricultural estate. Parts of it remained in use until the 12th century, when it was covered by a landslide. This protected the villa for centuries, until excavations began at the end of the 19th century.
    At the moment (2009) the villa is being restored. A significant part of the mosaics is off limits. What remains is definitely worth the trip though!
    Do yourself a favour and arrive early, before the tour groups show up, as it can get very crowded at the small viewing platforms of the villa.

    Opening hours: 10 - 18

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • tim76's Profile Photo

    Villa Romana: Triclinium

    by tim76 Updated Oct 16, 2009

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    gigantomachy
    4 more images

    The mosaic of the triclinium, dining room, is one of the largest of the villa. It's damaged and because of its size difficult to oversee. The central theme here is Hercules and his labours.
    One of the best parts is in the eastern apse: the gigantomachy, the battle between gods and giants. Five giants are hit by Hercules' arrows, their legs replaced by snakes.
    There's much more to be seen, such as the myth of Lycurgus and Ambrosia in the southern apse. Lycurgus, a Thracian king, tries to kill Ambrosia, a maenad (female follower of Dionysus), who is changing in a grapevine.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • tim76's Profile Photo

    Villa Romana: Sala della Piccola Caccia

    by tim76 Updated Oct 15, 2009

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Wild boar carried away in a net
    4 more images

    The mosaic of the little hunt covers the floor of what probably was a dining room. It shows twelve hunting scenes. Among them a big banquet, two hunters sacrificing to Diana and many action scenes from a hunt.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • tim76's Profile Photo

    Duomo

    by tim76 Updated Oct 4, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The duomo is situated at the highest point of town. Its green cupola towers above the ancient houses. Although this is definitely a Baroque church, it is not as lavishly decorated as many other churches on Sicily. The outside is quite sober and inside it's the unusual combination of blue and white decorations that stands out.
    Notice the Trinacria (the symbol of Sicily) below the left organ.
    If you have some time to kill before or after visiting the Roman mosaics, this is a nice way to spend it.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • angiebabe's Profile Photo

    Amazing mosaics at Casa Romana Casale

    by angiebabe Written May 23, 2009
    1 more image

    Amazing mosaics - 35 rooms of mosaics were discovered under the extensions over the original site which was thought to be a roman villa owned by a noble family.

    What is so useful about them are the stories they tell and show of the culture at the time - the height of fashion and activities of various classes and roles of men and women, even down to what was being by worn by roman women doing their exercises in a gym!

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • angiebabe's Profile Photo

    World heritage site Casa Romana Casale

    by angiebabe Written May 23, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    Its about 5 km from the hilltop walled town of Piazza Armerina,driving through pretty countryside with okay signposting until you up to a carpark and then there are signs in all directions with none giving you a definite of which way to go. I just deduced to walk along the obscure road that appeared to have white tent stalls ahead whereas when I got back to my car and watched other arrivees they were just as perplexed doing a few circles, then up the steep steps to some non related kids thing on the hill above.

    RAther frustrating - then even having to find which way to go to the ticket office was a bit difficult - then to the toilets and shops provided for the tourists that come all the way out that way are about a 10 min walk return from the ticket office and site entrance.

    But amazingly the admission fee was something like 3 euro with a good brochure included.

    Ongoing renovations are going on though which is advertised at the entrance but not to what extent - what was open was excellent but maybe a third of the amazing mosaics were not accessible.

    Well worth the visit though. as they are stunning and so many of them - 35 rooms or so made up the villa.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    The Mosaics of the Villa Romana

    by hquittner Written Apr 6, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Drink up big boy

    The mosaics number 40+ and cover 3500sq. m. of floor. There are fragments of painted wall murals and some carving, statuary etc. The finds are protected by glass walls and ceilings but the extensive deforestation in the area has caused repeated mud-slides which still occur( and originally buried the Villa.) The mosaics are attributed to N. African craftsmen (the only repository of the art in 300). They are for the most part cartoon-like but give a clear view of the tastes and humor of the rich of the time.(This is a part of the story of Ulysses giving Polyphemus wine; P. has 3 eyes(the Africans did not know the story well?). There is some depth and chiaroscuro here but the picture may not be sharp enough to convey it. Taking pictures in bright light with extreme shadows thrown by the roofing is beyond my ability. Wait until you try it.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Archeology
    • Seniors

    Was this review helpful?

  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    Villa Romana di Casale

    by hquittner Written Apr 6, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Big Max & 2 bodyguards

    The Villa in the Casale contrada of P.A. was vaguely known before serious recovery was begun in 1950. As one of the most elaborate complexes in the Roman world,it is amazing that so little information exists. The technical analysis put its date as around 300AD, thus attributing it to the co-emperor with Diocletian, one Maximian.,a Christian-hating dictator. He and D. retired to "distant retreats" simultaneously in 305, but M. returned and was a bigtime operator until his bloody death against Constantine. There is no doubt that he had the ability,wealth, and contacts to have quietly assembled the N. African mosaicists and artists to oversee this work. He also knew that other art forms had become worse than 2nd rate since Hadrian. As the excavations continue it is clear that there was a very large (protective?) community nearby.The entrance to the Villa is palatially impressive.( This mosaic section is part of the Big Hunt and resembles Max as seen on coins of the period)

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • Polly74's Profile Photo

    Villa Romana del Casale

    by Polly74 Written Apr 26, 2004
    Mosaics

    The "Villa del Casale" was built between 330 and 360 AD. The identity of its owner remains a subject of debate.
    Depicting scenes from daily life, such as hunting, the mosaics are as remarkable for their sociological value as for their artistry. One of these, showing women clad in two-piece swimsuits exercising with barbells, could well describe a scene typical of the twentieth century.
    The art itself is impressive, but the visitor is also struck by the size of the villa, whose architectural style differs markedly from that of urban dwellings such as those of Pompei. The villa's buildings are arranged in sections, with an impressive entrance and numerous rooms of various dimensions, some quite large. There are also the remains of water pipes, visible near the entrance.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Alice-Kees's Profile Photo

    Mosaic extravaganza!

    by Alice-Kees Updated Sep 10, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Detail of mosaics in the Casa Romana

    Be sure to visit the Casa Romana.

    You need at least an hour or two to take in all the splendid roman mosaics at the Casa Romana. The mosaics are made accessible by a network of walking bridges and are covered by a greenhouse to protect them from weather influences

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • tim76's Profile Photo

    Villa Romana: Second Vestibule

    by tim76 Written Oct 19, 2009

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    This vestibule gave access to the thermal baths. The mosaic depicts the lady of the house and her two children, flanked by slaves. The slaves are carrying clothes and oils for their mistress.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • tim76's Profile Photo

    Villa Romana: Peristyle

    by tim76 Updated Oct 16, 2009

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The internal garden of the peristyle is surrounded by a beautiful mosaic. It shows the heads of wild animals in round medallions of laurel.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • tim76's Profile Photo

    Villa Romana: Sala degli Amorini Pescatori

    by tim76 Updated Oct 15, 2009

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    One of the bedrooms to the north of the central peristyle features a wonderful mosaic of fishing erotes. On the walls some traces of the original frescoes.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Piazza Armerina

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

78 travelers online now

Comments

Piazza Armerina Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Piazza Armerina things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Piazza Armerina sightseeing.

View all Piazza Armerina hotels