Siracusa Off The Beaten Path

  • Castelluccio beach
    Castelluccio beach
    by rosata
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by rosata
  • the access point board from the path
    the access point board from the path
    by rosata

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Siracusa

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    Birdwatching in Plemmirio

    by rosata Updated Mar 16, 2015

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    The first SWALLOWS have arrived on the eastern coast of Sicily having flown across the Ionian Sea following over-wintering in Africa.

    First there were four, then there were eight, next time I looked there were eleven, then there were twenty and they were still arriving yesterday.

    What a joy they bring - spring has sprung - the swallows have brought the fine weather with them.

    I wonder which kind of bird will be next ...................

    I see quite a lot of organised birdwatching/twitcher tours especially in the season of spring around these parts of Sicily.

    I am an observer of nature both on the ground, in the air and over the water in these beautiful surroundings.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Birdwatching
    • Budget Travel

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    Siracusa Solariums 'a chilometro zero'

    by rosata Updated Jun 25, 2014

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    Solariums / Sea Bathing Platforms - Ortigia usually has platform access to the sea during the summer holiday season at Forte Vigilena on the Lungamare di Ortigia. This year Comune di Siracusa has added three more sea access platforms around the Siracusa coastline. The largest of the new solarium is Sbarcadero Santa Lucia, area of the Porto Piccolo di Siracusa/ Porto Marmoreo. The size is 200 square metres for this bathing platform. Another is off Via Sicilia in zona Tunisi, the area north of Siracusa, with a size of 130 square metres. The smallest of the new solarium is Via Riviera Dionisio il Grande, access via Via Iceta, with a size of 100 square metres.

    This could prove essential for a cooling dip in the sea or sunbathing for both tourists and residents also saving a trip out in the car or by bus or by train to the seaside resorts. The nearest actual sandy beaches are Fontane Bianche, Arenella and Fanusa. All these three have sandy bays with shallow water (of varying depths depending on the tide) for a good distance providing a shallow swimming pool effect for children and inexperienced sea swimmers.

    The nearest sea access from rocks for the purposes of swimming or sunbathing are at Plemmirio and Ognina.

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    • Beaches

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    Plemmirio Coastal Access Point 34

    by rosata Updated Nov 1, 2013

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    The protected marine area of Plemmirio has nominated access points to the coast around the peninsula.

    We walked around the headland of the bay on my curved photograph, probably a couple of miles altogether.

    The whole of Plemmirio can be walked or cycled or different sections explored.

    Punta Mola, Sbocco 34, is also a sea access point across the Porto Grande bay from Ortigia.

    Diving schools operate around the Plemmirio coast in some of the zones.

    We saw a diver going back to his scooter while we were there today!

    The panoramic shot has a curve! The access point board at the road side Ortigia across the Porto Grande
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    • Photography
    • National/State Park
    • Beaches

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    Plemmirio Coastal Access Point 30

    by rosata Updated Oct 25, 2013

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    The protected marine area of Plemmirio has nominated access points to the coast around the peninsula.

    This access point to the coast is in Zone A where there is no access to the sea for boating, fishing or swimming.

    Walk down to the lighthouse and carry on to walk along the many paths around the rocky peninsula.

    Bring a picnic, sun protection and water as the nearest bar is a mile away.

    The area is popular for bird watching, cycling and people interested in Operation Husky, the allied invasion of Sicily towards the end of the Second World War.

    The rocky Capo Murro di Porco The front of the notice board The back of the notice board Information about Plemmirio in English Close up of the lighthouse
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    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Plemmirio Coastal Access Point 35

    by rosata Updated Oct 25, 2013

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    The protected marine area of Plemmirio has nominated access points to the coast around the peninsula.

    Castelluccio beach is a beautiful bay for sunbathing or swimming.

    Half of the beach is used exclusively by guests of the Grand Hotel Minareto, Siracusa.

    Road access is from Via del Faro Massolivieri which is the continuation of Via Lido Sacramento being the first Plemmirio turning from the SS115 coming from Siracusa.

    On the first photograph you will see the ladder topped by a red umbrella belonging to the lifeguard for the hotel beach. This is the limit of the exclusive beach.

    The public beach is reached by steps as shown in the last photograph.

    Sbocco 35 coastal access becomes extremely busy in the height of summer and at the weekend.

    Castelluccio beach the access point board from the path the steps leading down to Castelluccio beach The turn just before Grand Hotel Minareto
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    • National/State Park
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    • Beaches

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    Plemmirio - Close to Nature

    by rosata Updated Sep 24, 2013

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    Ancient Plemmyrion is the promontory opposite the city of Siracusa which juts out and narrows the mouth of the Porto Grande, the large harbour of Ortigia, Siracusa.

    It is now deemed to be a peninsula for market garden agriculture and homes, many of which are holiday homes. A great proportion of the 14 kilometre coastline is good for sunbathing and swimming although this all is on and from rocks.

    The area close to the lighthouse at Capo Murro di Porco is 'Zone A' protected with no boats, fishing or swimming allowed in order to protect the marine life.

    Any other fishing in the Plemmirio Protected Sea Area is by permit only.

    The sea contains evidence of Carthaginian, Greek, Roman and Second World War artefacts, many of which have been recovered. The spectacular storms which frequently occur have caused many shipwrecks over the years. This is the first land reached from the Libyan coast of Africa making it a crossroads for the Sahara weather meeting the European land mass.

    The lighthouse near my house The path from our house down to the rocks Natural Rock Garden of capers and sea samphire Rock formations in the sea, Siracusa in background Rock formations in the sea
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    • Diving and Snorkeling
    • National/State Park
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    Piccolo Teatro Romano / Ginnasio Romano

    by rosata Updated Jun 18, 2013

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    The excavations here have not made it possible to ascertain the specific purpose for which the complex was used; some scholars have identified it as the Roman curia and others as a sanctuary to the oriental deities.

    It has been called a Roman gymnasium but 'is' a Roman theatre. The mistaken identity has arisen as it is a rare complex, apparently of one period, but closely similar to the theatre at Ostia.

    Access to the monument was via a quadriporticus (60m x 50m) raised above the interior floor level. The columns of the northern side of the portico were made of limestone and of the Doric order, probably belonging to an older phase of the building. In the interior are the remains of a small temple on a podium of an Italic type (17.5m x 17.5m). The excavations have brought to light numerous architectural fragments of the above ground section of the temple which was probably of the Corinthian order. To the rear of the temple the cavea of a theatre covered in marble has been found. Following excavations carried out in the 1990's, the portico-theatre-temple complex is dated between the 2nd century BC and the 2nd century AD.

    The on-site curator informed us that the water at this site arrives from the grotto at the Neapolis Archaeological Site which was excavated by the Greeks and flowed to the sea. The Romans intercepted the water flow for whatever reason. The water level has risen considerably and the orchestra of the theatre is now under water.

    Regardless of the site being situated at the side of a main road it remains a peaceful space for contemplation of times gone by. It is only been maintained for the last couple of years and for that I am very happy.

    Opening Hours: Monday to Saturday 1000 - 1400
    Entry is Free
    Address: Via Elorina, Siracusa (Opposite the military base on the first section of the road from Siracusa)

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Architecture
    • Photography

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    The caves - shelters

    by croisbeauty Updated Sep 10, 2011

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    There are number of small caves above the Greek Theatre, some of them adjusted to serve as a shelter, in case of sudden rain during the performance. The other served for the actors, as their locker room. There is also cave with the water spring, so this network of caves probably served as a place where people lived long before the theatre was built.

    caves around the Greek theatre hollows in the rock water source in the rock some wall paintings roks with caves around the theatre

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    Castello Eurialo

    by hquittner Written Mar 29, 2005

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    The Siracusans were a creative and hardy group who ultimately rivalled Athens. Very fertile they founded 3 more colonies not far from S.,places for the adventurous and leisurely tourist to see,(Is there such a person?)The Castello is an immense fortress quite different from later types that we have seen elsewhere. Built to guard the land approach(NW) to Sir.,it sits on the highest part of the Epipolaen ridge (epi+polis) over-looking the city below. It is out in the country far from the ugly modern urban-industrial growth. It has rough gardens near the entrance where we had a picnic lunch.The fortress fell without a battle to the Romans in 212BC. No earthquakes or wars, only time-wear and overgrowth touch it. Bring a good diagram to understand it better and revel in the vistas and clambering around.We had the whole area to ourselves! To reach it go rt. off via Necropoli Grotticelli direction Belvedere, just before town. Coming from the N. thru town take the left fork beyond town. (see a map).

    Ancient Greek Fortress

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    Megara Hyblaea

    by hquittner Updated Mar 26, 2005

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    What would compel the Megarian pioneer settlers in 730BC to sail along the Greek coast and cross the Ionian Sea to the East coast of Sicily to found a colony? Since 734BC neighbors from Corinth had been building a city 20 miles further south as Siracusa, and further north at Naxos other Greeks some 20 years earlier.They must have all been very successful and fertile because the Megarians sent settlers further along the south coast to found Selinunte in 650BC. Alas, ultimately they were destroyed,first by the Siracusans in 489BC and again when they regrew by the Romans as revenge for their siding with Carthage. Excavation of the remains began in 1949. All the good finds are in the museum in Siracusa.What is still present are a large area of defensive walls and building bases and a few broken capitals and a primitive type of mosaic flooring that are not of museum quality.We were the only people in this desolate place. This is an old "dig" with nicely constructed pathways and bridges but no instructional elements. The materials were exciting to consider but we had no archeological background. Finding and seeing the site was the end in itself.It stands there in the middle of a coastal oil refinery wasteland (1 mile away both N. & S.)Maybe 20 years from now it will be further developed for tourists?

    Not Museum Quality
    Related to:
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    • Archeology
    • Seniors

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    Palazzo Mergulese-Montalto

    by Lalique Updated Nov 15, 2002

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    This superb palazzo, although rather dilapidated, dates from 14C. The upper section is ornamented with highly elaborate windows. The building itself is not inhabited (at least as it seemed to me), so you can try to investigate it from inside out.

    Via Mergulensi (very center just off Piazza Archimede)

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    Siracusa is on the sea, some...

    by lichinga Written Sep 12, 2002

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    Siracusa is on the sea, some 80 km South of Catania, but the sea and beaches themselves are not so attractive themselves: I mean, they're good, but the reason to go there is not just for diving and sun-tanning.
    The best thing is to visit the interior region, all the places I will mention are very important touristic and cultutal targets: Palazzolo Acreide (old Greek town), Noto (the capital of Baroque), Ragusa (also very imprtant Baroque monuments), Piazza Armerina (incredible ruins of a Roman Villa). Then, you may want to visit the Natural Reserve Area of Vendicari, the ancient 'tonnara' at Capo Passero or Capo delle Correnti, the 'tonnara' is the place where tuna-fish and sword-fish were coolected by fishing vessels. Or you may buy a very special wine, 'Cerasuolo'. Cerasuolo is may favourite red wine, very strong, around 13-14° alcohol, it is produced in the area of Vittoria and Modica, between ragusa and the sea (the Sicily Channel).
    Many of these places are illustarted in my Travelogue - the picture at the bottom is taken in Ragusa, 40 km from Siracusa.

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    When visiting the Parco...

    by josie13 Written Aug 26, 2002

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    When visiting the Parco Archeologico, do take a walk through the adjoining gardens and take a glimpse of the Ear of Dyonisius. Unfortunately it is believed that 7,000 Athenians were killed here after loosing a battle in 413 BC.

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    The fresh water spring was...

    by Nobbe Updated Aug 24, 2002

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    The fresh water spring was used by the greece people when they settled down in this area, and build the town Siracusa.

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