Trento Favorites

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Most Recent Favorites in Trento

  • Maurizioago's Profile Photo

    APT Trento and Monte Bondone.

    by Maurizioago Updated Apr 8, 2014

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    Taken from the web site.

    Favorite thing: Have a look at the web site of the Trento and Monte Bondone tourist agency; wwwapt.trento.it. Here you'll find info about accomodation in Trento area; art and culture suggestions (museums, churches...), events and so on.

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    S. Marco Park.

    by Maurizioago Updated Apr 8, 2014

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    Favorite thing: This park belonged to the monastery of Saint Marco and was also used as an orchard. It was rebuilt between 2001 and 2002.

    Here you can see various kinds of roses, lots of trees, various kinds of plants and a small maze.

    You can enter the park from via San Marco; not far from the castle.

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Trento Card

    by sandysmith Updated Jun 14, 2008

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    Favorite thing: If spending a while in Trento then this card may be good value for you: For 9 euros you have:
    * Museums in Trento and their exhibitions
    * Botanical Alpine Garden, Monte Bondone
    * Guided tours of the Wine Cellars with wine tasting
    * Public transport services in the city
    * Trento ­Sardagna cable car
    * Bicycle hire
    * Plus 10% discount in the car parks, shops, restaurants and associated taxis of Trento and Monte Bondone, swimming pools, ski lifts, ski school, ice rink, Cross-country ski centre, paragliding and sports equipment hire.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Palazzo della Regione, the Presidence

    by JLBG Updated Jan 11, 2007

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    Palazzo della  Regione, the Presidence
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    Favorite thing: Palazzo della Regione Trentino-Alto Adige is a low, modern looking building lying in front of Dante's Square with a wide open gallery running in front. The entrance bears on one side “Palazzo della Regione Trentino-Alto Adige Presidenza Giunta Regionale” and on the other side “Region Trentino Süd Tirol, Präsidium des Regionalausschusses”.

    I have made under "Local Customs" a special tip on the complex language situation in Regione Trentino-Alto Adige/Region Trentino Süd Tirol.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Palazzo della Regione, offices

    by JLBG Written Jan 10, 2007

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    Palazzo della  Regione, offices
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    Favorite thing: The offices of the Palazzo della Regione stand in another, taller, building, 200m away. The architect was also Adalberto Libera. It is also built in an aerial way and a large part of the building is standing on a pillar that contains the staircases and lifts. The whole, though huge, looks very light and elegant.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Palazzo della Regione, the architecture

    by JLBG Written Jan 10, 2007

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    Palazzo della  Regione, the architecture
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    Favorite thing: The architecture of the Palazzo della Regione is especially striking once you are in the gallery. The main part of the building is corbelled and standing on huge pillars, some are looking like giant hands that bear the first level. Others look like elegant spools. This is the work of Adalberto Libera (1903-1963), a famous local architect that belonged to the avant-garde of modern architecture in Europe. It was built from 1954 to 1963.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

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    Palazzo della Regione, the Presidence

    by JLBG Written Jan 10, 2007

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    Palazzo della  Regione, the Presidence
    2 more images

    Favorite thing: Palazzo della Regione Trentino-Alto Adige is a low, modern looking building lying in front of Dante's Square with a wide open gallery running in front. The entrance bears on one side “Palazzo della Regione Trentino-Alto Adige Presidenza Giunta Regionale” and on the other side “Region Trentino Süd Tirol, Präsidium des Regionalausschusses”.

    Provincia autonoma di Trento (Autonome province of Trento) and Provincia autonoma di Bolzano (Autonome province of Bolzano) make up the Regione Trentino-Alto Adige.

    TheTrento Province has several small linguistic minorities.
    A Ladin speaking minority. Ladin is a mountain Latin language of the Rheto-Roman branch, also spoken in Switzerland (where it is the fourth national language, appearing on the banknotes).
    Two minorities speaking German languages, the Mochen language and the Cimbra language.

    The situation in the Bolzano province, is very different. The population is mainly native German speaking (69%). Native Italian speakers occur for only 26% of the population, mainly in Bolzano/Bolzen. The Ladin minority accounts for 5%. German is an official language in the province, together with Italian. The Bolzano province is also called Alto Adige/Süd Tirol province. Both name have been officially recognized by the Italian constitution in 2001.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Piazza Cesare Battisti, Fiore lunare

    by JLBG Written Jan 10, 2007

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    Piazza Cesare Battisti, Fiore lunare
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    Favorite thing: On Piazza Cesare Battisti the monument called Fiore lunare (moon flower) matches perfectly with the modern theater. It was built in from 1981 to 2002 to recall the memory of Marco Pola (1906-1991), poet from Trento. Please not that this is Marco Pola and not Marco Polo, who anyway lived in a completely different century!

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Teatro, Piazza Cesare Battisti

    by JLBG Written Jan 10, 2007

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    Teatro, Piazza Cesare Battisti

    Favorite thing: Cesare Battisti was born in 1875, in Trento, then a part of Austria-Hungary. He became a leader of the "irredentismo" movement that fought for Italian speaking territories, such as the Trento region, to become part of Italy. He was sentenced to death for high treason to Austria and executed in the courtyard of Castello del Buonconsiglio in 1916.

    Piazza Cesare Battisti, though in the old city center looks very different. On one side of the square, stands the theater with a very modern look.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Jeannkelly's Profile Photo

    Local Cuisine

    by Jeannkelly Written Apr 16, 2006

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    Favorite thing: Strange but true....Trento or all of Trentino-Alto Adige is rather influenced more by the Austrians. So, expect having to dine at the local birriera (pub), eat strudel and kraut and yes the brulèt- apple rind with red wine, boiled and sweetened. Oh, I loved this drink. Cost 3euros on the street corner. Highly recomment for alcohol-lovers (loves alcohol but not to a fault, ok?) like me.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Wine Tasting

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    The Dolomites

    by iandsmith Updated Jul 10, 2005

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    The Dolomites

    Favorite thing: Trento, in addition to be a great town, is also nestled in a valley of the Dolomites and it is possible to go skiing from here on both the eastern and western sides of the town.
    The east also takes you to lago land as I call it, in particular Lago di Garda and all its attractions.

    Fondest memory: The Dolomites are my favourite mountain range mainly because of the dramatic cliffs and more spectacular scenery that they offer over the alps as evidenced in this picture.
    Two of the skifields look directly on to Trento though it takes a while to get there from the town itself.

    Related to:
    • Skiing and Boarding
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    The free tour

    by iandsmith Updated Jul 10, 2005

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    Martyrdom

    Favorite thing: My favourite thing about Trento is the free tour. Bring it on I say. Shame I've only had the first ten minutes of it. Twice! (see my Intro page for humorous view).
    It happens on Saturdays at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. and is multilingual.
    One of the first things you get to see on the tour (no matter how many times you take it) is the Palazzo Salvadori, a Renaissance-style palace built in the early 1500s by the Lombard artist Lucio di Pietro.
    What you find out though is that it sits where the Jewish synagogue from the middle ages once was.
    There are two oval medallions above the doors, sculpted by Francesco Oradini. They tell a poignant tale of how a boy was found "drowned" in the river but, upon inspection, he was believed to have been strangled.
    The Jews were falsely blamed (as they seem to be for most things) and the Catholics did nothing to stem that victimization (as our guide was wont to point out) and so today these two plaques depict Simonino's martrydom and glory. The victimization was officially recanted in 1965.
    A rough translation (and here I am indebted to fellow VT member tapis volant) goes as follows: "In the depths of these buildings where once there was a synagogue now a small shrine has been constructed. The blessed matyr, three toothed Simon, 29 months old,was murdered by utmost torture by the Jews on the 23rd March 1475 in the dead of night."
    Here again I am indebted to tapis_volant for her work in tracking the full story down.
    "Born in Trent, Italy, in 1472; died 1475. According to reports of the time, Simon was a 2-1/2-year-old Christian boy living in Trent, Italy. The story was told that the Jews met in the synagogue on Tuesday of Holy Week to decide how to celebrate Passover that year, which fell on Holy Thursday. Reportedly, they
    decided to sacrifice a Christian child on Good Friday out of hatred for Christ.
    A Jewish doctor cajoled young Simon from his home while his parents were attending the Tenebrae service on Wednesday evening.

    Fondest memory: The story continues that he was murdered at midnight on Holy Thursday. The description of his crucifixion is horrid. After his death his body was supposedly hidden in various places to prevent his parents from finding it and finally thrown into the river.
    Under intensive and terrible torture, those arrested for the crime admitted to it, were executed after further torture, and burnt. The synagogue was destroyed and a chapel erected on the spot where the child was thought to have been martyred. The child's relics now rest in a stately tomb in St Peter's Church in Trent. Though the murder was blamed on the Jews of Trent, there never was
    any proof that such a crime was committed for ritualistic purposes. The account of Tiberinus, the physician who inspected the child's body, and the juridical acts can be found with recorded notes of the day.
    The trial was reviewed in Rome by Sixtus IV in 1478 but he did not authorize the cultus of Saint Simon; it was done by Sixtus V in 1588, largely on account of miracles worked at his shrine.
    While miracles were later reported at the child's tomb, this is not one of the more stellar events in the history of the Church as evidenced by the removal of his name from the Roman Martyrology in 1965 by the Sacred Congregation of Rites, that forbade all future veneration. The cause behind the child's death is considered quite uncertain.
    As to why his feast is celebrated liturgically if it is forbidden I'll venture a guess. There are probably some churches which had been dedicated to his patronage and celebrate their patronal feast day. It is indeed possible that Simon is numbered among the saints in heaven, as evidenced by the miracles, but not for being a martyr, which is the primary reason the cultus was banned.
    In art, St. Simon is a child crucified, tortured, or mocked by Jews. At times
    he may be shown (1) strangled with a cloth around his neck, holding a banner,
    nails, and pincers; or (2) with a palm (sign of a martyr) and long bodkin."

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

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  • Gianni_F's Profile Photo

    Valle di Sella

    by Gianni_F Updated Feb 15, 2005

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Al Carlon

    Favorite thing: Questa non e' Trento, ma una valle in provincia di Trento. Qui soggiornava il Presidente del Consiglio Alcide Degasperi.

    This is't Trento, but one Valley in province of Trento. Here lived also the Prime Minister Alcide Degasperi.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Eco-Tourism

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Castel Stenico

    by iandsmith Updated Aug 20, 2004

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    Outpost with a view

    Favorite thing: Castel Stenico crowns a hilltop in the foothills of the Dolomites, above the village of the same name. It is one of the oldest examples of the evolution of castle building, recorded as long ago as the 10th century and which continued developing until the area came under Austrian rule. Its history is closely connected with the episcopate princedom of Trento. In accordance with successive art typologies the bishops transformed it into an elegant and secure castle residence.

    Fondest memory: The frescos in the great halls are especially noteworthy, probably the work of Marcello Fogolino who was present at the court of Bernardo Clesio in Trento. The castle’s decline began during the occupation by Napoleonic troops. In 1829 it became the property of the Austrian state and was used to house the royal courts of the valley. To the south, behind the walls, a new connection between the two existing buildings was built. Eventually the castle was conferred to the Italian state and the first restoration work began in 1910. From 1973 onwards the work was continued by the Autonomous Province of Trento which had by then assumed responsibility (until 1957 a part of the castle housed the Stenico Carabinieri station). The castle complex is reached from the village square along a steep ramp up to the north wall, passing a hotel which was at one time the castle stables. Above the entrance portal there were originally two small open turrets. Its distant image can be made out in the fresco ‘cycle of the months’ in the tower Torre dell’Aquila (approx. 1400) in the Buonconsiglio castle at Trento. It is a venue for contemporary art and photographic competitions and has a significant archaeological section covering the area’s history. The castle is owned by the Autonomous Province of Trento and is open every day except Mondays (during the tourist season there are free guided tours each Wednesday - advance notice appreciated).

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Castello againo

    by iandsmith Written Aug 19, 2004

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    A castle from any angle

    Favorite thing: If you're not happy of my previous picture then here's one I prepared earlier................about a year earlier in fact. During my brief visit the previous year, curtailed due to illness, I took this snap immediately after I pulled up in the carpark.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

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