Trento Favorites

  • Favorites
    by sandysmith
  • Favorites
    by Maurizioago
  • Nice building
    Nice building
    by draguza

Best Rated Favorites in Trento

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Castello del Buonconsiglio

    by iandsmith Updated Apr 29, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Not to be missed

    Favorite thing: This is one of the premier castles in Italy. The varied architectural styles, not always homogenous, have combined to make an impressive fortress nonetheless.
    It commenced in the early 13th century and, for over 500 years, was the seat of the Bishop Princes of Trentino.
    Inside the Torre dell'Aquila has fine examples of medieval knightly paintings, commissioned by Giorgio of Liechtenstein and done by a Bohemian artist. The unbroken wall to wall pictures called "Il ciclo dei mesi" represent the months and feature a wonderful variety of individual scenes.
    Then there's the Magno Palazzo, another art-filled wonder with sculptures, stucco works and frescoes.
    If you still haven't had enough then you can walk the Via Bernado Clesio and along the castellated walls to the Torre Verde, a 1450's tower with and unusual spire that was built for defensive purposes before the Fiume Adige was diverted in the 19th century.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Piazza Duomo

    by iandsmith Updated Apr 29, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    More from the Piazza Duomo

    Favorite thing: Wherever you look in the piazza, there's something to admire. It has variety. There's a fountain, painted walls, tower, duomo, castle, museum and room to move. Is this the best piazza in all Italy?

    Fondest memory: The fountain of Neptune, sculpted by Francesco Antonio Giongo in 1767.
    For Neptune himself, see my "Intro" page.
    The four sculptures at the base represent the four continents of the then known world.
    The building behind is one of the two-part Case Rella. On this one are painted subjects such as Virtue, Time, Fortune, Apollo, Abundance and the Triumphs of Love.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    The free tour

    by iandsmith Updated Jul 10, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Martyrdom

    Favorite thing: My favourite thing about Trento is the free tour. Bring it on I say. Shame I've only had the first ten minutes of it. Twice! (see my Intro page for humorous view).
    It happens on Saturdays at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. and is multilingual.
    One of the first things you get to see on the tour (no matter how many times you take it) is the Palazzo Salvadori, a Renaissance-style palace built in the early 1500s by the Lombard artist Lucio di Pietro.
    What you find out though is that it sits where the Jewish synagogue from the middle ages once was.
    There are two oval medallions above the doors, sculpted by Francesco Oradini. They tell a poignant tale of how a boy was found "drowned" in the river but, upon inspection, he was believed to have been strangled.
    The Jews were falsely blamed (as they seem to be for most things) and the Catholics did nothing to stem that victimization (as our guide was wont to point out) and so today these two plaques depict Simonino's martrydom and glory. The victimization was officially recanted in 1965.
    A rough translation (and here I am indebted to fellow VT member tapis volant) goes as follows: "In the depths of these buildings where once there was a synagogue now a small shrine has been constructed. The blessed matyr, three toothed Simon, 29 months old,was murdered by utmost torture by the Jews on the 23rd March 1475 in the dead of night."
    Here again I am indebted to tapis_volant for her work in tracking the full story down.
    "Born in Trent, Italy, in 1472; died 1475. According to reports of the time, Simon was a 2-1/2-year-old Christian boy living in Trent, Italy. The story was told that the Jews met in the synagogue on Tuesday of Holy Week to decide how to celebrate Passover that year, which fell on Holy Thursday. Reportedly, they
    decided to sacrifice a Christian child on Good Friday out of hatred for Christ.
    A Jewish doctor cajoled young Simon from his home while his parents were attending the Tenebrae service on Wednesday evening.

    Fondest memory: The story continues that he was murdered at midnight on Holy Thursday. The description of his crucifixion is horrid. After his death his body was supposedly hidden in various places to prevent his parents from finding it and finally thrown into the river.
    Under intensive and terrible torture, those arrested for the crime admitted to it, were executed after further torture, and burnt. The synagogue was destroyed and a chapel erected on the spot where the child was thought to have been martyred. The child's relics now rest in a stately tomb in St Peter's Church in Trent. Though the murder was blamed on the Jews of Trent, there never was
    any proof that such a crime was committed for ritualistic purposes. The account of Tiberinus, the physician who inspected the child's body, and the juridical acts can be found with recorded notes of the day.
    The trial was reviewed in Rome by Sixtus IV in 1478 but he did not authorize the cultus of Saint Simon; it was done by Sixtus V in 1588, largely on account of miracles worked at his shrine.
    While miracles were later reported at the child's tomb, this is not one of the more stellar events in the history of the Church as evidenced by the removal of his name from the Roman Martyrology in 1965 by the Sacred Congregation of Rites, that forbade all future veneration. The cause behind the child's death is considered quite uncertain.
    As to why his feast is celebrated liturgically if it is forbidden I'll venture a guess. There are probably some churches which had been dedicated to his patronage and celebrate their patronal feast day. It is indeed possible that Simon is numbered among the saints in heaven, as evidenced by the miracles, but not for being a martyr, which is the primary reason the cultus was banned.
    In art, St. Simon is a child crucified, tortured, or mocked by Jews. At times
    he may be shown (1) strangled with a cloth around his neck, holding a banner,
    nails, and pincers; or (2) with a palm (sign of a martyr) and long bodkin."

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Piazza corner

    by iandsmith Updated Apr 29, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A sight for the tourist

    Favorite thing: On my first trip to Trento I only saw a couple of external frescoes then went to Bolzano and wondered what all the fuss at Trento was about. This time I managed to understand what the fuss was about. I wandered three times as many streets (and ran a few as well!) but got to understand more about this proud city that doesn't get the tourist numbers it warrants.

    Fondest memory: Here you can clearly see why they call it the painted city. This is a corner of the Piazza Duomo.
    In the background is the Torre Civica where a Roman porta used to stand. In fact, some of it was used in this construction. It signalled the start of the via Claudia Augusta.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Palazzo Geremia

    by iandsmith Written Apr 30, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    More than just a wall

    Favorite thing: On Palazzo Geremia, a detail of a fresco from the 16th century in the Veronese style.
    The palace itself dates from the 15th century and the paintings depict significant events in the history of the city. Here we undoubtedly see the city burghers overlooking one of the many parades, triumphal entries and diplomatic assemblies depicted on the walls.
    It's opposite Palazzo Thun and is also used for government purposes today.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Castel Besano

    by iandsmith Written May 1, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Entrance pathway to the castle

    Favorite thing: South of Trento, and north of Revereto, if you're on the main strada, you can't help but notice something on a prominent hillside. At night, under floodlights, it is positively dramatic; an inspiring sight dominating the heavens.

    Fondest memory: Castel Besano was actually lived in until 1973 but, when you see the state it is in even today, it is plainly obvious that only a very small part of it must have been occupied.
    (For more details and pictures, see my travelogue and Intro)

    Related to:
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Teatro, Piazza Cesare Battisti

    by JLBG Written Jan 10, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Teatro, Piazza Cesare Battisti

    Favorite thing: Cesare Battisti was born in 1875, in Trento, then a part of Austria-Hungary. He became a leader of the "irredentismo" movement that fought for Italian speaking territories, such as the Trento region, to become part of Italy. He was sentenced to death for high treason to Austria and executed in the courtyard of Castello del Buonconsiglio in 1916.

    Piazza Cesare Battisti, though in the old city center looks very different. On one side of the square, stands the theater with a very modern look.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Maurizioago's Profile Photo

    APT Trento and Monte Bondone.

    by Maurizioago Updated Apr 8, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Taken from the web site.

    Favorite thing: Have a look at the web site of the Trento and Monte Bondone tourist agency; wwwapt.trento.it. Here you'll find info about accomodation in Trento area; art and culture suggestions (museums, churches...), events and so on.

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Palazzo della Regione, the architecture

    by JLBG Written Jan 10, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Palazzo della  Regione, the architecture
    3 more images

    Favorite thing: The architecture of the Palazzo della Regione is especially striking once you are in the gallery. The main part of the building is corbelled and standing on huge pillars, some are looking like giant hands that bear the first level. Others look like elegant spools. This is the work of Adalberto Libera (1903-1963), a famous local architect that belonged to the avant-garde of modern architecture in Europe. It was built from 1954 to 1963.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Palazzo della Regione, offices

    by JLBG Written Jan 10, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Palazzo della  Regione, offices
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: The offices of the Palazzo della Regione stand in another, taller, building, 200m away. The architect was also Adalberto Libera. It is also built in an aerial way and a large part of the building is standing on a pillar that contains the staircases and lifts. The whole, though huge, looks very light and elegant.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Piazza Cesare Battisti, Fiore lunare

    by JLBG Written Jan 10, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Piazza Cesare Battisti, Fiore lunare
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: On Piazza Cesare Battisti the monument called Fiore lunare (moon flower) matches perfectly with the modern theater. It was built in from 1981 to 2002 to recall the memory of Marco Pola (1906-1991), poet from Trento. Please not that this is Marco Pola and not Marco Polo, who anyway lived in a completely different century!

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Castel Stenico

    by iandsmith Updated Aug 20, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Outpost with a view

    Favorite thing: Castel Stenico crowns a hilltop in the foothills of the Dolomites, above the village of the same name. It is one of the oldest examples of the evolution of castle building, recorded as long ago as the 10th century and which continued developing until the area came under Austrian rule. Its history is closely connected with the episcopate princedom of Trento. In accordance with successive art typologies the bishops transformed it into an elegant and secure castle residence.

    Fondest memory: The frescos in the great halls are especially noteworthy, probably the work of Marcello Fogolino who was present at the court of Bernardo Clesio in Trento. The castle’s decline began during the occupation by Napoleonic troops. In 1829 it became the property of the Austrian state and was used to house the royal courts of the valley. To the south, behind the walls, a new connection between the two existing buildings was built. Eventually the castle was conferred to the Italian state and the first restoration work began in 1910. From 1973 onwards the work was continued by the Autonomous Province of Trento which had by then assumed responsibility (until 1957 a part of the castle housed the Stenico Carabinieri station). The castle complex is reached from the village square along a steep ramp up to the north wall, passing a hotel which was at one time the castle stables. Above the entrance portal there were originally two small open turrets. Its distant image can be made out in the fresco ‘cycle of the months’ in the tower Torre dell’Aquila (approx. 1400) in the Buonconsiglio castle at Trento. It is a venue for contemporary art and photographic competitions and has a significant archaeological section covering the area’s history. The castle is owned by the Autonomous Province of Trento and is open every day except Mondays (during the tourist season there are free guided tours each Wednesday - advance notice appreciated).

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Palazzo della Regione, the Presidence

    by JLBG Updated Jan 11, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Palazzo della  Regione, the Presidence
    2 more images

    Favorite thing: Palazzo della Regione Trentino-Alto Adige is a low, modern looking building lying in front of Dante's Square with a wide open gallery running in front. The entrance bears on one side “Palazzo della Regione Trentino-Alto Adige Presidenza Giunta Regionale” and on the other side “Region Trentino Süd Tirol, Präsidium des Regionalausschusses”.

    I have made under "Local Customs" a special tip on the complex language situation in Regione Trentino-Alto Adige/Region Trentino Süd Tirol.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • garibaldi's Profile Photo

    A "petit extraordinaire" city

    by garibaldi Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: This city is placed in North East of Italy near VERONA.
    If you have visited Verona and you are going to Austria you can spend a day in this city.
    It's not big and in a day you can visit the center and the castle and have a funny evening in one of pubs full of university students.

    Related to:
    • Study Abroad

    Was this review helpful?

  • Azhut's Profile Photo

    Castello del Buonconsiglio

    by Azhut Written Sep 10, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Of particular interest are the frescoes which picture the twelve months of the year in Torre dell'Aquila, painted by an anonymous fourteenth-century artist in the international gothic style. For securoty measures, visits are restricted to groups of max. twenty people, escorted by museum personnel). A restored building houses the civic museum of the Risorgimento and fight for freedom (opening hours; same as Castle museum), containing mainly relics and mementoes of the irredentist movement of the first world war and of the Resistance.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Trento

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

66 travelers online now

Comments

Trento Favorites

Reviews and photos of Trento favorites posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Trento sightseeing.

View all Trento hotels