Florence Local Customs

  • the last Medici - 300 years to Florence
    the last Medici - 300 years to Florence
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  • Local Customs
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Most Recent Local Customs in Florence

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    The city of arts and culture

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 18, 2012

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    Giotto
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    Uffizi Gallery was begun by Giorgio Vasari in 1560 for Cosimo I de'Medici as the offices for the Florentine magistrates. The cortile (internal ourtyard) is long and narrow and open to the Arno River at irs far end through a Doric screen that articulates the space wthout blocking it.
    The Gallery collection contains works of the world most prominent artists, such as: Leonardo, Giotto, Botticelli, Titian, Michelangelo, Raphael, Cimabue, Duccio, Caravaggio, ....and many more.
    Giotto di Bondone (1266-1337), better known as Giotto was an painter and and architect from Florence. He is generally considered the first in a line of great artists who contributed to the Italian Renaissance.
    Niccola Pisano (1220-1284), was an Italian sculptor whose work is noted for its classical Roman sculptural style. He is considered to the the founder of modern sculpture.

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    Just couldn't resist

    by croisbeauty Written Nov 9, 2012

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    Golden's view window shop

    "Golden view" is famous piano bar situated in Via Dei Bardi, Oltrarno, just a few metres from Ponte Vecchio. Besides fine espresso and sorted wines it offers fine snacks based on a seafood. This on the picture is window shop of the "Golden view's" kitchen, which overlooking Via Dei Bardi. I just couldn't resist not to take this picture when passing by.

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    Living in Florence

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 7, 2012

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    small people of Florence
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    Yeah, visiting places like Florenece probably is dream of every traveller or tourist and one of world's a must see destinations. But then the question is are we tourists and visitors welcomed by the locals, especially in a pick of a season months when streets of Florence are overcrowded by those who aren't always neccessarily polite?
    Do we take into the consideration fact that some locals must work in their offices while in front of it stands group of tourists who are listening strident yelling of their tourist guide? Are we tourists always sensitive regarding mothers who walking their babies? And finaly, wheter would be very happy if the relatively small amount of space we have to share with many visitors?

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    Benvenuto Cellini

    by croisbeauty Written Nov 5, 2012

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    The Bust of Benvenuto Cellini
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    Benvenuto Cellini, born in Florence (1500-1571), was goldsmith, sculptor, painter, musician and soldier. He was one of the most important atrists of Mennerism. Apart from being the most significant goldsmith of his time, Cellini was also great sculptor who's work "Perseus with the Head of Medusa" can be seen in Loggia dei Lanzi.
    Cellini was perhaps best known for his personal bravery and roughneck behaviour. He had significant role in the defense of Pope, in the attack upon Rome by Charles III, Duke of Bourbon. Cellini himself shot and injured Philibert, Prince of Orange and allegedly Charles III. Later on Cellini had many affrays in which he killed several people, but fact that was protected by the Popes have saved his life.

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    Take It To Go

    by riorich55 Updated Jul 6, 2012

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    As the sign in the picture clearly states. If you want your ice cream and a seat be prepared to spend 4 Euros more per ice cream for the privilege of using one of the tables. Maybe you want a table to rest your weary feet or maybe to do some extended people watching. Whatever your reason you will pay extra.

    This held true for a number of different places we saw through Italy, so if in doubt if it will cost you to sit at a table, look around for a friendly sign or if you do not see one just ask!

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    Grafittis

    by joiwatani Updated Nov 20, 2011
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    Get used to the grafittis on the walls, on business establishments, on apartment buildings, on the streets...These grafittis are all over Florence. Sometimes these grafittis don't make sense, no meanings. I guess some bored Italian took a large pentel pen or spray paint and write on the wall to make a statement that has no sense.

    To clean this up is expensive and labor-wise, takes a lot of time.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

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    Haggling and bargaining at the night market

    by joiwatani Written Nov 20, 2011
    This guy gave me a 40% discount on jewelry boxes
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    Since I grew up in Asia, I had a culture of bargaining and haggling products that I buy. I don't usually pay what the seller tells me. I firmly negotiate the price and most of the time, I get the discount. Everywhere I travel, I get the negotiated price!

    When I was in Florence, I bought gifts (mini-jewelry boxes), scarves, leather book covers, coin purses at discounted prices. When fellow travellers asked me how much I paid for them, they were surprised that I bought my gift items 40 percent lower than what they paid for the same item.

    "Italian" sellers in Florence night markets don't give discounts as much as those immigrants sellers. "Italian sellers" are not usually into haggling! One got mad at me when I tried to haggle a leather book cover 50 percent of the retail value.

    Most of the sellers at the night market in Florence are from Africa. I liked "negotiating" with them because they were very friendly. And, they were used to it, too.

    Also, one of the tip is that make sure to compare prices first before you lock in the negotiated price that you wanted to pay. Also, compliment the seller (I can detect immediately if he is the owner of the stall/store or not. If he is willing to negotiate, he is the owner. If not, I leave and go to another store).

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Palazzo Pazzi

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 10, 2011

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    Palazzo Pazzi
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    One can be confused with different names this palace have; Palazzo Pazzi, Palazzo Congiura or Palazzo mai finito - (Palace Pazzi, the Palace of Conspiacy, the Palace never complited).
    Pazzi family were bankers with the support from Pope Sixtus IV and King of Neaples, and held important position in the Renaissance Florence but it wasn't good enough, they wanted much more. They aim was to seize political and economic power from the Medici. In this palace the conspiracy against the Medici's was hatched and planned in 1478; Giuliani de Medici was killed while Lorenzo il magnifico managed to escape. After conspiracy failed the retribution was brutal; public execution of most conspirators, all Pazzi property was confiscated and the Pazzi name destroyed. De' Medici become even stronger then before.
    The palace was built by the architect Giuliano da Maiano, designed in the style of Brunelleschi.

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    Palazzo - Torre dei Gianfigliazzi

    by croisbeauty Written Oct 8, 2011

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    Torre dei Gianfigliazzi
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    Originally it was home of the Guelph family Ruggerini who had to abandoned it in 1260, after the battle at Montaperti. It was built almost as the fortress but then reconstructed at the end of the 13th century by family Gianfigliazzi, who were the owners of the palace until 1764.
    From the beginnings of the 18th century the palace was used as Accademia dei Nobili, hospiting many famous people, such as Alessandro Manzoni, Vittorio Alfieri and the king Loiuis Buonaparte.
    Nowadays the palace is used as a hotel.

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    Palazzo Bartolini Salimbeni

    by croisbeauty Written Oct 8, 2011

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    Palazzo Bartolini Salimbeni
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    Palazzo Bartolini Salimbeni was the first palace in Florence built according to the Roman Renaissance style. It was designed and built by the architect Baccio d'Agnolo, from 1520-1523 and he was paid two florins per day. The new style caused much criticism to the architect d'Agnolo, leading him to add the Latin inscription "Carpere promptius quam imitari" (critisizing is easier than imitating). The windows have another inscription in Italian saying "per non dormire" (in order not to sleep), which was the motto of the Salimbeni family. It is reference to the members of Salimbeni family habit to postpone sleeping to affairs.

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    Palazzo Spini Ferroni

    by croisbeauty Written Oct 8, 2011

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    Palazzo Spini Ferroni
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    The palace Spini Ferroni, built from 1289 for the rich cloth merchant and banker Geri Spini, was the largest private-owned palace in Florence. The design of the building has been attributed to Arnolfo di Cambio.
    Later on the palace was divided between the two branches of the Spini and the section facing the square of Santa Trinita was sold in 17th century to marquis Ferroni. After a period as a hotel, in 1846 the comune of Florence bought it and was used for offices during the period when Florence was capital of Italy, from 1865-1871.
    In 1930 the palace was bought by Salvatore Ferragamo, the famous shoe designer, and from 1995 its second floor houses the museum founded by Ferragamo.

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    Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 8, 2011

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    Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze
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    The BNCF, (National Central Library) is public library, largest in Italy and one of the most important in Europe. It was founded in 1714 when scholar Antonio Magliabecchi bequeated his collection of books with 30.000 volumes to the city of Florence. Thats why the library is originally known as Magliabechiana. It was reguired that a copy of every work published in Tuscany be submitted to the library.
    The library, located at the Piazza dei Cavalleggeri, has an collection of over six millions books, magazines, editions, manuscripts and incunabules.

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    When in Rome (or Firenze), do as the Romans do

    by Bunsch Updated Dec 1, 2010

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    I must have led a charmed life up to this particular venture to Italy, because in all the other countries I visited, English was either one of the standard languages or, in the case of France, I spoke the ambient tongue. I suppose I expected that many, if not most, of the hoteliers and shop keepers and transport personnel in Italy would speak at least a modicum of English. I didn't invest in a phrase-book (although it turned out my companion had brought one along). What arrogance! I have only myself to blame for the multiple times when language barriers led to absurd or disappointing results. (It is hard to ask for directions when you can't articulate where you want to go -- and can't understand when someone tries to help out.)

    Probably no one reading this tip would make such a foolish mistake, but just in case...either learn enough Italian to get by, or keep a phrase-book or English-Italian dictionary close at hand. I promise you'll have a more enjoyable visit.

    (And as one VT'er says in a very funny motto which I will badly paraphrase, speaking English slowly and very loudly does NOT make it more comprehensible!)

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Women's Travel

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    Cover charges and tipping

    by Bunsch Written Aug 25, 2010

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    When you are seated at an Italian restaurant, you should anticipate paying "coperto" or a cover charge, assessed on a per person basis. This ranges from something minimal to several euros, presumably depending upon the restaurant although I never analyzed this during our trip. Since the cover charge is intended to compensate the restaurant for the cost of doing business, including the employment of the wait staff, I was told not to apply the American standard of tipping 15% or more of the bill. Rather, the tradition seemed to be to put one's excess change on top of the credit card slip or cash to cover the meal. That sometimes resulted in several euros' "tip" but it would still be a fraction of what I'd pay at home, even if one included the coperto.

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    Never on a Monday

    by Bunsch Written Aug 25, 2010

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    Not just in Firenze...many (perhaps most) Italian museums are closed on Mondays. This can be a spirit-killer if you're only in a city or town for a single day and the museums are unavailable, which is why the Spirit moves me to suggest that much of Italy's great art is found in its churches, virtually all of which are open every day of the week (and are generally free, to boot). So find your Caravaggios and della Robbias in the local duomo, and soak in the notion that people have been hallowing with their prayers the place where they are situated for many hundreds of years.

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Florence Local Customs

Reviews and photos of Florence local customs posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Florence sightseeing.

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