Battistero San Giovanni & Gate of Paradise, Florence

4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars - 78 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • battistero di San Giovanni
    battistero di San Giovanni
    by croisbeauty
  • Battistero di San Giovanni
    Battistero di San Giovanni
    by croisbeauty
  • Battistero di San Giovanni
    Battistero di San Giovanni
    by croisbeauty
  • Karahan's Profile Photo

    The door of heaven

    by Karahan Written Nov 4, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Baptistry is very famous because of its doors that were built by Lorenzo Ghiberti. Also one of the oldest buildings of the city. The most famous one was chosen by a competition. Ghiberti, Donatello and Brunelleschi made their work of arts around the middle of 1400s. Ghiberti wins the competition. Golden door that you can see at the baptistry nowadays is a successful copy of the original one (it's in Museo dell'Opera del Duomo). It has 10 different figures. Every one of them tells different stories (like banishment of Adam and Eve)

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • paoseo's Profile Photo

    The Baptistery Doors n°2

    by paoseo Written Aug 28, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This second pair of doors were so good that the Florentines decided to commission Ghiberti, now at the height of his career, with the execution of yet another set of doors to place at the north entrance. These doors took 27 years to complete (1425-1452), but the result was so outstanding (even Michelangelo said that they were "worthy of Paradise"), that they were hung on the east side, in the place of honour, and Ghiberti's first set of doors was moved to the north entrance (where they can still be seen today).
    Their structure is completely different: the panels are reduced to 10, five to each door, and are surrounded by a continuous sequence of small heads, floral motifs and niches which, in their turn, contain small statues of Prophets and Sybils.
    Ghiberti followed it by inserting more than one episode in each panel, using daring but coherent perspective solutions. Its secret lies in the perspective, by that time a law of expression, evoking skies, distant woodlands, buildings, groups of figures and personalities that project sharply outwards and are sculpted in what is almost high relief. The Doors of Paradise thus become Ghiberti's masterpiece and unified all his skill as a goldsmith and sculptor, for the gold highlights he used created wonderful perspective and pictorial effects, giving it a precious finish that was also an integral part of the composition.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • paoseo's Profile Photo

    The Baptistery Doors n°1

    by paoseo Written Aug 28, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The 3 doors to the Baptistery open onto the east, north and southern sides of the square. The main one is placed on the eastern side, facing the Cathedral, with the the apse and the altar in the interior of San Giovanni behind it.
    Andrea Pisano, was the first artist to work here and only took seven years (1330-1336) to complete his pair of doors. Andrea divided the two doors into 28 compartments or panels (14 to each door), surrounded by a frame of rosettes and lions' heads. The interior of panels, framed with the typical Gothic "polylobate" surround, contains 20 episodes from the life of the Baptist, and 8 figures of Virtues in the lower part. Each composition is well constructed, with a close relationship between figures and background, while the rythm of the narrative is constant and contained. This is therefore a "classical" and not a Gothic vision of the narrative.
    The new doors remained here until 1401 when was announced a competition for a second pair of doors; these were again for the east side, replacing the previous ones, which were to be moved to the south side, where they can still be seen today (the present entrance into the Baptistery). The subject was the Sacrifice of Isaac. The competition was won by Ghiberti, whose work was still partly Gothic in style and therefore easier to understand.The contract for the execution of the work was signed on November 1403 but the doors were to take Ghiberti and his workshop twenty years to complete: they were finally hung in the east entrance in 1424, replacing the doors by Andrea Pisano. The structure of the door was like the earlier one: 28 panels surrounded by the usual "polylobate" Gothic frame which was placed inside a square decorated with plant motifs. The only variation was that the lions' heads were substituted by those of the Prophets. The small head in the centre of the left-hand door portrays Ghiberti himself. 20 panels illustrate scenes from the life of Christ, while the remaining 8 contain the Evangelists and the Fathers of the Church.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • paoseo's Profile Photo

    Inside the Baptistery

    by paoseo Written Aug 28, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The baptistery

    The origins of the temple dedicated to St. John the Baptist, later patron saint of the city, are still uncertain, even if many sources referred it to Roman times . Several sarcophagi have in fact been found in this area, today in the Museum of the Opera del Duomo, as was the famous statue of Mars, which mediaeval chronacles tell us stood at the entrance to Ponte Vecchio. Excavations carried out in this century have in fact discovered remains of Roman constructions underneath the Baptistery and the Cathedral, built in the north-eastern area of the first ring of walls. The foundations of the first Baptistery of San Giovanni, dated from 4th-5th century circa, was certainly built on top of these ancient buildings. Its octagonal shape, the two lower orders, the attic and the springer of the cupola (in other words its basic architectural structure), date from the early Christian construction, which was possibly altered or completed in the early decades of the 7th century during the Longobard rule.
    The eight segments of the cupola had certainly been completed by then as well as the semicircular apse which was added on the west side to contain the altar: the three doors opened on the other three sides. The external revestment of the Baptistery was started also in this period (mid 12th century) : this masterpiece of white Carrara and green Prato marble inlay, geometrically designed in a harmonious classical style to cover the original sandstone, already shows signs of the search for spatial delimitation that was to lead to the perspective of the Renaissance. The final result was to become a prototype for Romanesque architecture in the city and used as a model by Leon Battista Alberti when he started work on the completion of the facade of Santa Maria Novella in 1470. The eight corner ribs decorated with strong green and white stripes (originally in grey stone) were instead more typical of the Romanesque style in use at Lucca, Pisa and Pistoia. I'll speak about the doors in another tip.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • codrutz's Profile Photo

    Baptism of Christ

    by codrutz Updated Aug 22, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Easy to miss one. Above the East Door of the Baptistery there is a group of statues that shows the scene of The Baptism of The Christ, naturally by St. John The Baptist. The statues are not the original ones, made by Andrea Sansovino. The originals are to be found in the museum Opera del Duomo. Interesting thing: Andrea Sansovino worked for 3 years (1502-1505) to make the original scene only with Christ and St. John, he did not finish it and left for Rome for a new comission. The task was continued much much later, in 1569 (!), by Vincenzo Danti, a sculptor from the school of Michelangelo. He kept on working for 7(!) more years, until his death. The statues were not fully completed though. The group was finally completed in 1792 (so after 290!!! years from the first chip of Sansovino) by Innocenzo Spinazzi, with an addition of an angel to the left of the group. It can clearly be seen that the angel is not in perfect harmony with the two and it is made from a different coloured marble.

    Was this review helpful?

  • codrutz's Profile Photo

    Bronze doors of the Baptistery

    by codrutz Updated Aug 22, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The Baptistery of Florence has three bronze doors, the most impressive being the south one (vis-a-vis of the entry in the Duomo); this is not usable for entry in the baptistery, for that the west door is used. This door is made by A. Pisano and the other doors were made both by Ghiberti. Michelangelo defined the east door as the Gate of Heaven. The south door is divided into 28 tiles with Stories of St. John the Baptist and Cardinal and Theological Virtues. Get close to the tiles and take a look at the sculptor's marvel art. Andrea Pisano worked for 6 years for this door, between 1330 and 1336.

    Was this review helpful?

  • codrutz's Profile Photo

    Baptistery

    by codrutz Updated Aug 22, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Vis-a-vis from the entrance of the Duomo you will find a fine example of the 11th-century Romanesque architecture - the Baptistery. I repeat: the baptistery was built in the 11th century, a couple of hundred years before the Duomo! It was the city cathedral until 1128 and it is dedicated to St. John the Baptist. Many illustrious men of Florence, including Dante, were baptized here. The layout is basic, perfect octogonal with a 26 meters diameter. It's roof is pyramid-shaped and topped by a lantern with columns; it is also covered in white and green marble.

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Gilded Bronze Doors

    by keeweechic Updated Jul 25, 2006

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of the gilded bronze doors - the famous 'Gates of Paradise' as described by Michelangelo were created by Ghiberti and is one of the greatest accomplishments in Western sculpture. Depicted are Old Testament stories

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sue08080's Profile Photo

    "The Gate of Paradise"

    by Sue08080 Written Jul 11, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Piazza San Giovanni

    The duomo facade of pink, green and white marble is a delightful surprise, surrounded as it is by somber buildings. As you enter the piazza it's a magical vision!

    The three colors of marble seem as delectable as a wedding cake. Here you can see the delicate Campinale and the beautifully decorated Baptistry, with its magnificent doors, called by Michelangelo "the gates of Paradise".

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • rcsparty's Profile Photo

    Gates of Paradise

    by rcsparty Written May 1, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The doors to the Baptistry which face the Duomo are beautiful bronze doors created by Ghiberti. The doors were described as the Gates of Paradise by Michaelangelo. The originals are in the Duomo museum. You can't miss these, as they will be the doors that have a mob of people surrounding them. I was fortunate to get a slight gap to shoot a picture.

    Was this review helpful?

  • margaretvn's Profile Photo

    Baptistry doors

    by margaretvn Updated Jan 29, 2006

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Baptistry Doors Florence
    1 more image

    Take a close look at the beautiful doors.
    These doors by Ghiberti were commissioned in 1401 to celebrate the cities deliverance from the plague. Ghiberti was chosen to make a set of doors after a competition which involved seven top artists. These included Donatello, and Brunelleschi.
    Ghiberti spent 21 years working on the North doors and was then commissioned to make the East doors (1424-1452). Michelangelo called the doors the 'Gate of Paradise'. The original doors are now displayed in the Museo dell Opera del Duomo and the ones on the Baptistry are copies.
    There are three sets of doors, the oldest being those on the south side.
    The south side doors illustrate the life of John the Baptist who is the titular saint of the Baptistery and the city's patron. They were fashioned by Andrea Pisano in the 1330's.
    The north doors were made in 1402 - 1425 and these doors show the life of Christ.
    The 'youngest doors' are the east ones and were called the 'Doors of Paradise' by my favourite artist Michelangelo. They show scenes from the Old Testament. They were modelled and cast by Ghiberti between the years 1425 - 1450. The doors have now been replaced by copies.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • margaretvn's Profile Photo

    the Baptistery

    by margaretvn Updated Jan 29, 2006

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Baptistery of Saint John is the oldest building on the square. For years it was thought to be a pagan temple 'converted' for Christian use.
    In the 5th or early 6th century the first baptistery was erected in fron the the cathedral that was then there - the Santa Reparata. This early Baptistery building was similiar shape to the one we see today - octagonal. This octagonal shape is though to represent the 'octava dies' the eighth day - the time of the Risen Chist. It alludes to the hope of resurrection after death of the Christian faith.
    From the mid-11th century the Baptistery was reconstructed on a larger scale as we see it today. It was also decorated with expensive marble (a lot of it taken from ancient buildings). It was,for FLorence, a time of financial and political growth. Flroence became the seat of Imperial government in Tuscany and then it broke free from the Holy Roman Empire. During the 12th and 13th century the Baptistery was enlarged further with a monumental dome and a rectangular apse. Then from the 14th century the wonderful external sculptured decoration was added.
    When you enter the Baptistery you can see why it is traditonally said that it was once a Roman temple. The general arrangement of the large domed area recalls the Pantheon and it also has monolithic columns adn 2 sculptured sarcohagi. the wall decoration is geometrical amd the lovely mosiacs show Byzantine influence. All of this makes it a mixture of several cultures of Medieval Europe.
    Looking up from the font in the Baptistery you see a large Christ in 13th century mosaics and under his feet the dead are rising as in the Lasat Judgement. There are also the figures of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob the fathers of ancient Israel on Christs right head side. On his left is Hell with images of death.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • fishandchips's Profile Photo

    Gates of Paradise

    by fishandchips Updated Jan 23, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gates of Paradise

    The east door of the Duomo is probably the most famous door with only the Jubilee door at St Peters in the Vatican more famous. Described at gates worthy of paradise by Michelangelo they are indeed a great sight. Ghiberti designed the east door which depicts scenes of the Old Testament. Damaged by floods in 1966 when the Arno got a bit full the original doors are in the Cathedral Museum with these ones very good copies.

    Was this review helpful?

  • geeyook's Profile Photo

    Baptistry of Florence

    by geeyook Updated Nov 22, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Baptistry in Florence

    Dating back to ancient Roman times, the octagonal Baptistry is the oldest Christian Temple in the city. The current structure was built between the 11th and 13th century on the site of a pagan temple. The most famous feature of the Baptistry are the east facing guilded bronze doors by Ghiberti. The doors were dubbed "Gates of Paradise" by Michelangelo.

    Was this review helpful?

  • geeyook's Profile Photo

    Eastern Door of Baptistry

    by geeyook Updated Nov 22, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Baptistry

    The current eastern doors are actually copies of the originals. Damaged by the centuries and a 1966 flood, the restored original door panels are housed in the nearby Opera Del Duomo Museum. Consisting of 10 gilded bronze panels depicting Biblical scenes, it took Ghiberti 27 years (1425-1452) to complete the massive doors to the Baptristry. Inspired by Ghiberti's masterpiece, Michelangelo called it the "Gates of Paradise". If you look carefully you will notice a self portrait of Ghiberti at the center of the door.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Florence

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

104 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Battistero San Giovanni & Gate of Paradise
4.0 out of 5 stars
90 Opinions
0 miles away
Show Prices
4.5 out of 5 stars
911 Opinions
0 miles away
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
92 Opinions
0.1 miles away
Show Prices

View all Florence hotels