Campanile Di Giotto, Florence

4.5 out of 5 stars 61 Reviews

Piazza Del Duomo

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  • oriettaIT's Profile Photo

    414 steps to the top!

    by oriettaIT Updated Mar 3, 2014

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    The bell tower is famous and everything has been said about it, still, if you are in good health and have no problem climbing a lot of stairs, the view from the top is outstanding!
    you will be able to see the entire center of Firenze from up above and also all the details on the Cathedral above you and the dome's roof.
    There is no elevator so be sure you are prepared to the climb of 414 steps.
    The stairwell is not too narrow but it handle two way traffic so you will have to stop and let other people go often. I can assure you the pause will be well welcomed especially when you are walking up!
    The line to get in can get pretty long, it is best to be there at opening time. Hours are subject to change so better check them on the Duomo site

    View of the bell tower Inside of the bell tower View over the dome waaaay down there!
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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Giotto’s Campanile

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jun 17, 2012

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    Giotto’s Campanile is a free-standing campanile that is part of the complex of buildings that make up Florence Cathedral on the Piazza del Duomo.
    Standing adjacent the Basilica of Santa Maria del Fiore and the Baptistry of St. John, the tower is one of the showpieces of the Florentine Gothic architecture with its design by Giotto, its rich sculptural decorations and the polychrome marble encrustations.

    This slender structure stands on a square plan with a side of 14.45 meters (47.41 ft). It attains a height of 84.7 meters (277.9 ft) sustained by four polygonal buttresses at the corners. These four vertical lines are crossed by four horizontal lines, dividing the tower in five levels.

    Giotto?s Campanile Giotto?s Campanile
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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Climb up the campanile for a great view!

    by Jefie Updated Jun 23, 2010

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    Since we couldn't really afford to visit the entire duomo, we decided to pick one thing - Giotto's campanile. It costs 6 Euros to visit the campanile (vs. 8 Euros for the dome) and it's only 6 m shorter than the dome, and much less crowded. The campanile was designed by Giotto, the duomo's second "Master", and construction of the belltower began in 1334. When Giotto died in 1337 he was replaced by Andrea Pisano, who in turn died in 1348 and was replaced by Francesco Talenti. The latter supervised the completion of the 85 m tall campanile in 1359.

    There are 414 steps to climb to reach the very top of the campanile (no elevator) and some are not exactly easy to manoeuvre, but the view from the top is totally worth the effort! It's also possible to rest up on some of the levels as you're going up and take a look at the city through the tower's famous Gothic windows. Of course the area at the very top is fenced in, but it's still quite easy to take good pictures. We went early in the morning to beat the crowds and got to see Florence in the morning mist - the city looked so pretty from up there!

    The campanile is open daily from 8:30 am to 7:30 pm.

    At the top of the campanile View of Florence in the morning Inside the campanile Looking towards the Palazzo Vecchio You'd think it'd be easier going down!!
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  • Maria81's Profile Photo

    Giotto's Tower

    by Maria81 Written Dec 21, 2009

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    What is it?

    Adjacent to the Duomo, the Giotto Tower offers some of the best views of Florence, as well as great close-up photo opportunities for Duomo shots. Be warned though - it's 414 steps to the top! (but totally worth it)

    View of Florence from Giotto's Tower
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  • aukahkay's Profile Photo

    The Campanile di Giotto

    by aukahkay Written Nov 5, 2009

    The Gothic campanile which rises on the right of the Duomo was begun by Giotto in 1334 and finished at the end of the 14th century bhy Pisano, Talenti and others. It stands 84m tall and is entirely decorated in hexagons and rhomboids and by niches with statues.

    Camanile
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  • Donna_in_India's Profile Photo

    A Good Climb!

    by Donna_in_India Updated Jul 5, 2009

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    Florence is an exceptionally beautiful city from above so we decided to climb Giotto’s Campanile (the cathedral bell tower). We had a choice of either that or the Dome but chose the bell tower so we could see the Dome.

    It had been rainy or overcast for our first few days in Florence. We finally got a break and a little sun and headed to the bell tower. It was 414 steps to the top (and 414 back down!). It was broken into 4 levels and the climb really wasn’t so bad. At each level the views got better and we had fairly nice views of the city from the top.

    For any climb, I recommend taking water, wearing comfortable shoes, and if at all possible, going when the sky is bright!

    Hours Daily 8:30am-6:50pm

    Prices Admission 6€

    Please note that all visitor information is correct as of this writing.

    View from Giotto���s Campanile Giotto���s Campanile View from Giotto���s Campanile View from Giotto���s Campanile
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  • Tijavi's Profile Photo

    Campanile

    by Tijavi Updated Jul 5, 2009

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    A 14th-century creation of green, white and pink Tuscan marble by Giotto, the Duomo's Campanile is in itself an attraction (and deserves a separate VT entry!). Unfortunately Giotto did not live long to see his creation come to fruition - he died before it was completed and the task of completing the bell tower fell into the hands of Andrea Pisano and Francesco Talenti. The reliefs on the Campanile by Pisano (picture 3) are replicas as the originals have been removed for posterity and are displayed at the Museo dell'Opera del Duomo.

    The Campanile is open to those who are strong enough to climb this 82-meter high behemoth (that's 414 steps) and offers great views of the city. Having had my fair share of tower-climbing (in Venice and Bologna), I thought I'll give this one a pass and instead went up to Piazzale Michelangelo for a bird's eye view of Florence.

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  • jorgec25's Profile Photo

    The Giotto Tower

    by jorgec25 Written Jun 9, 2009

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    Climbing up the Giotto Tower will allow you to enjoy some beautiful views, not only of the city but also of the Duomo. And this way you will climb up fewer steps, since the tower is slightly smaller than the Duomo.

    If you suffer from vertigo (like i do), the Giotto Tower is also a good choice because the balcony is closed with an iron fence, that allows you to take all the photos you want, but makes you feel safe at the same time.

    Giotto tower the balcony at Giotto tower View from Giotto tower
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  • abi_maha's Profile Photo

    The Campanile di giotto

    by abi_maha Written Mar 7, 2009

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    The "Cupolone" or huge dome remains, with the cathedral bell-tower, known as the "CAMPANILE DI GIOTTO", the most striking feature of any view of the city. Giotto, the famous painter and architect designed the tower, although at his death in 1337 only the lowest part was complete. Work was continued under Andrea Pisano (c. 1290-1349) and Francesco Talenti (active 1325-1369) who completed the structure repeating the decoration of marble relieved by windows.

    The huge bell tower How it looks as you walk towards the same View from the tower
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  • wilocrek's Profile Photo

    The Tower!

    by wilocrek Written Jan 12, 2008

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    Its a heck of a climb, but again well worth it once you get to the top. Like most places if you get there early you will beat the crowds and have it to yourself. Nothing quite like hearing nothing but your footsteps as you climb the tower in early morning chill! There are various resting points during the climb so no worries about being out of shape, it can be done!

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  • craic's Profile Photo

    The Campanile or the Duomo - or both?

    by craic Written Nov 23, 2007

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    It cost 6 euro for both climbs. I knew exactly which one - neither. I don't like heights. We had been talking to two young American girls in the restaurant the night before and they had climbed the Duomo. It sounded fascinating - you get a close up look at the painting in the dome - but the climb seemed quite claustrophobic and vertiginous - and I'm thinking no thanks.
    So Matt set off to climb the pretty tower. All pink and white and green and glistening like a sugar cake. He found it easy enough to do. The bells started ringing while he was half way up but he said the noise didn't knock you around. And there is a little man way up the top - I suppose he rings for the ambulance if someone has a heart attack and stops people jumping or writing graffiti. Matt was thinking poor thing - he has to climb up every day. Let alone toilet breaks. Unless he has a bucket.
    Anyway you pays your 6 euro, you climbs the tower, you looks at the view and then you climbs down. Then you've deserved a sit down coffee.

    Because it's there.

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  • Redang's Profile Photo

    Campanile di Giotto/Giotto's Bell Tower

    by Redang Updated Oct 6, 2007

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    The Bell Tower was finished after the death of Giotto, the architect of the project.

    Other websites:
    - www.firenzeturismo.it/component/option,com_wrapper/Itemid,44/lang,en_EN
    - www.mega.it/eng/egui/monu/buq.htm

    Giotto's Bell Tower (Florence, Italy) Giotto's Bell Tower (Florence, Italy)

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  • rita_simoes's Profile Photo

    The Campanile

    by rita_simoes Updated Sep 13, 2007

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    6€ to climb more than 400 steps... You get to the top without breath, sweating (and maybe swearing too... :P), your legs trembling, and then... You're presented with an incredible view over Florence that makes it all worth it!

    No more words needed, but I do raccomend to take water (since we forgot and it was terrible) and always remember that it's not an easy climbing before you pay your ticket.

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Il Campanile

    by mikey_e Written Aug 21, 2007

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    Cattedrale di Santa Maria del Fiore or Il Duomo took 150 years to complete, but luckily the people of Florence had long managed the art of piecemeal contracting and assigned the construction of the Campanile or Bell-Tower to Giotto, who began work on this architectural marvel in 1334. Giotto died in 1337 and his work was finished by Pisano and Talenti, the former carving the bas-relief that features the creation of man and the planets at the base of the Campanile. You can climb to the top of the 84.7 m tower, but be aware that the only way up is the 414 steps - no elevator here!

    Il Campanile
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  • viddra's Profile Photo

    Giotto's Campanile

    by viddra Written May 21, 2007

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    The Bell Tower (Campanile) is 82m high and one of the most beautiful in Italy. For certain sum of money you can climb to the top and admire the wonderful view of the city.

    The Tower is covered in white, green and red marble. It was designed by Giotto in 1334, but finished by Andrea Pisano.

    Giotto's Campanile
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