Chiesa di Orsanmichele, Florence

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  • Chiesa di Orsanmichele
    by croisbeauty
  • Chiesa di Orsanmichele
    by croisbeauty
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    Orsanmichele
    by croisbeauty
  • JoostvandenVondel's Profile Photo

    Orsanmichele

    by JoostvandenVondel Updated Jul 31, 2009
    Christ and St. Thomas, Detail
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    This lovely little building was first built in 750 as an oratory of Saint Michael and was surrounded by the vegetable garden of a former Benedictine monastery. Later, in 1336, a new structure was built on the same site as a market and grain store, but given the piety of the Florentine population, the ground floor, by 1380, had been turned into a church.

    The exterior of the building is adorned with statues of the patron saints of various guilds. These were added during the second half of the fifteenth century and include, for example, the magnificant "Christ and Saint Thomas" (1467-83) by Andrea del Vorrocchio, commissioned by the Tribunale di Mercanzia. Other works, or rather the original works by Verrocchio, Ghiberti, Donatello and Luca della Robia are located in the Museo di Orsanmichele (upper two floors of the building, but at the time of this review closed due to renovations). The interior could be taken as slightly gloomy, but I think it is brightened by the presence of the high altar and tabernacle decorated by Orcagna and doted with a "Madonna and Child" by Bernardo Daddi (1347).

    The church is open from Tuesday to Sunday, 10:00 - 17:00 and closed Mondays. There is no entrance fee and well worth a pop in.

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  • lina112's Profile Photo

    Orsanmichele

    by lina112 Written Nov 17, 2008

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    The church was originally built in 1337 by Francesco Talenti, Neri di Fiorante and Benci di Lione as a grain market. Between 1380 and 1404 it was converted into a church used as the chapel of Florence's powerful craft and trade guilds.

    Fue construida en 1337 por Francesco Talenti, Neri di Fiorante y Benci di Lione originalmente como mercado de grano. Entre 1380 y 1404 fue convertida en iglesia y usada como capilla por los mas poderosos gremios de artesanos y comerciantes de Florencia.

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  • codrutz's Profile Photo

    Church of Orsanmichele

    by codrutz Updated Aug 22, 2006

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    The name derives from the ancient oratory of S. Michele in Orto. This was replaced in 1290 by A. di Cambio to host the grain logia-market. In 1380, the building became a church and the outside arcades were closed off. Tabernacles were then made to host many bronze statues of the patron saints of various guilds. Check out each of the statues. I liked the St. Peter by Donatello, St. John the Baptist by Ghiberti and St. Thomas with Christ by Verrocchio.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Orsanmichele

    by croisbeauty Written Sep 20, 2005

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    The church of Orsanmichele, built in 1290 by Arnolfo di Cambio, was once a loggia used as comunal granary which later became an oratory. In between 1337 and 1404, the oratory was transformed into the church. The base, in a shape of large cube, is closed by a delicate late Gothic marble decoration, while the upper part is more unuform with walls in pietra forte, same as Palazzo Vecchio. A series of tabernacles and statues runs along the walls of the church.

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  • geeyook's Profile Photo

    Orsanmichele Church

    by geeyook Updated Aug 6, 2004

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    Orsanmichele Church

    Florentine Gothic church built in 1337. It was originally an open loggia housing a grain market. The loggia was enclosed in 1380 and converted to a church. The arches of the old loggia are still visible. The 2 upper floors were also added and served as the city's emergency grain stores. The outside niches of the church are adorned with statues commissioned by the various guilds of their patron saints. The church houses works and masterpieces by artist such as Donatello, Verrocchio, Ghiberti and Luca della Robbia.

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    Sculptures of Chiesa di Orsanmichele

    by jon_and_may Written Mar 18, 2004

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    Sculptures @ Orsanmichele.

    I studied the statues of Chiesa di Orsanmichele during my years in University, but nothing prepared me for the real thing.

    Orsanmichele is very significant to the history of Florence (rebirth from the plague) and to art itself. The sculptures pre-date the Renaissance (all built in the 1400s) but already they show styles typical of Renaissance art. Each sculpture was completed by various guilds in the city depicting their patron saint, each with their own significance.

    Amoung the artists who did the statues are Donatello (the green oxidized statue on the right in the picture), and Ghiberti (the same person who did the bronze doors on the baptistry).

    The ironic thing is that because Orsanmichele is on the path between Piazza della Repubblica and the Duomo, everyone ignored Orsanmichele. I was the only lone person walking around the building (it's not very big) taking pictures and examining the pieces.

    At the time we went, the interior of Orsanmichele was closed for repairs, but the exterior was open for everyone to see.

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  • viddra's Profile Photo

    Orsanmichele

    by viddra Written May 21, 2007
    Orsanmichele
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    This building was meant to be a grain market, but never served its original purpose.

    You can find 14 niches with the statues of saints around it.

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