Galleria dell'Accademia, Florence

4.5 out of 5 stars 78 Reviews

Via Bettino Ricasoli, 60, 50122 Firenze, Italy +39 055 294883

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  • Galleria dell'Accademia
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  • Galleria dell'Accademia
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  • Not the real big, naked guy
    Not the real big, naked guy
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  • Must see David!

    by nelson193 Updated Oct 20, 2007

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    Again, since September busy tourist month, best to book tickets for Galleria dell'Accademia as soon as your arrive in Florence if not earlier. Fortunately, our travel person had pre-booked a half day city tour with a local guide that included entrance to the Galleria. Whereas we entered almost immediately, there was a long line of people awaiting general admission.

    'David" is definitely worth a visit, and must say, upon entering the room at one end, where "David" located, and seeing statue standing alone, highlighted at the other end of the room, you 'felt' the impact of first view. I simply said, "Wow!" out loud.

    Unfortunately, no photos allowed, and I honored our guide's request (more so than the museum's.) Of course, flashes were going off anyway from large guided groups despite museum personnel's adament announcements about no photos. There is an option that I will mention in my next tip!

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    David's home

    by viddra Written May 21, 2007

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    One of the most popular museums in Florence, the Gallery houses many sculptures by Michelangelo, including the famous David.

    This Gallery was founded in 1784 by the Grand Duke Pietro Leopoldo, who decreed that all the schools of painting should be joined together in a single Academy.

    Opening times: Tuesday - Sunday from 8.15 to 18.50
    closed Mon and holidays

    Ticket: Euro 6,50

    a copy
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  • mileslunn's Profile Photo

    Galleria Academia

    by mileslunn Written Jul 26, 2007

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    One of the most popular places to visit in Florence, this has much of the famous Florentine art including the collection of instruments from the Medici family. It is also where the original David by Michelangelo is located. Unfortunately photography is prohibited so the photo here is a replica located elsewhere.

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    Galleria Dell'Academia

    by valSmallFry Updated Nov 13, 2006

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    The line to get in is very long. So i would recommend buying a ticket in advance. You can do that at the Museum or online. The Galleria is home to Michelangelo's David. I'm an art lover, but I have to say, I found it hard to be awe-struck by the David when I was in a city surrounded by such magnificent sculptures. However, he is impressive in his realism, and shear size.

    The Dell'Academia was built as a school where students could study the work of the masters. You'll find an abundance of religious artwork here.

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    Galleria dell' Academia

    by Nexus7 Written May 25, 2003

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    This must see museum of the renassaince is packed so arrive early. You can see the works of Michelangelo, Leonardo Da Vinci, and all your other favorite Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. The sculptures were absolutely stunning. The age of the works is priceless as well. In this picture of David it was brought to my attention that the hands are rather large. That was to enhance the detail of them.

    Heeeeeeeeere's David
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    Can you say ART? Out of all...

    by snmred Written Sep 12, 2002

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    Can you say ART? Out of all the art in the world, 60% of it is in Italy, out of that 60%, 50% is in Florence. If you enjoy art you will think you have died and gone to heaven. You have several world renown galleries, museums and churches. Start with the Academia where Michelangelo's statue of David is, the Galleria Uffizi which is home to thousands of famous pieces, so many that you cannot go through the entire place in one tour. That is just two, there are many others including the Duomo, Santa Croce, San Marco and more. There is also a beautiful botanical gardens and plenty of fabulous shopping!!!
    For those who enjoy shopping Florence is no place to get bored. If you like shoes, you have several fairly priced stores with beautifully made Italian leather shoes. There is the San Lorenzo Market which features over 100 vendors and their goods on display ranging from leather coats to paper to jewelry. There are several wonderful bookstores and tons of clothes shopping.

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    Accademia & Michaelangelo

    by brendareed Updated Jun 16, 2014

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    Most people come to Florence and have a visit to the Accademia on their must-see list for one statue only – the statue that has come to symbolize Florence: Michelangelo’s David.

    This massive 13 foot tall warrior stands proudly at the end of a wing that has other works by Michelangelo in it. But you are drawn to the David so go there first, wander all around the statue standing high on his pedestal, and just enjoy this magnificent piece of art. I had seen lots of art in the week I was there – and some of it rather famous and spectacular pieces – so while I was excited about finally seeing the David, it wasn’t a big deal for me. But I was wrong…I was surprised at my first reaction to the piece as I saw it from the other end of the hallway. It was breathtaking…literally. Like everyone else, I didn’t even see the other works that I walked right passed to get to Florence’s most famous piece. And once there, I enjoyed the work of a master sculptor.

    David was sculpted out of one big piece of marble that had been sitting around the Cathedral work area. At some point, someone had come along and attempted to make something with it, but gave up. It was Michelangelo that got the commission to create a statue from the marble.

    This is the Biblical David, the young boy that slays the giant Goliath with a single pebble. As he stands there, in the moments before the kill, you can see the emotion in his eyes. He’s thinking, strategizing, and formulating his plan. His sling is over his shoulder and the pebble is in his hand. This is unlike the other Davids in Florence – Donatello’s two and Verrocchio’s; these three Davids show the boy after he has killed the giant. Michelangelo chose the moment before – David doesn’t have that cocky victorious air about him, but rather he’s contemplating the upcoming battle. Was Michelangelo’s creation of a facial expression of readiness influenced by Donatello’s St. George which is now in the Bargello?

    Michelangelo sculpted this massive statue in 18 months and kept scaffolding around it so no one could see what he was working on. Once it was finished, a committee (that did not include the artist) decided it should be placed in front of the Palazzo Vecchio (town hall), where it stood for many years. However, time and weather took its toll and it was brought inside in the 1800s with a copy standing outside in the original location.

    NOTE: Don’t even try to take a photo of David. The guards around the statue are rather vicious in their enforcement of the no photo rule. I saw several people get verbally abused for even looking at their camera! Saying that, the two photos I have with this tip were not taken by me, but my very brave and fearless classmate, Lissa, who snapped these photos unbeknownst to the guards. I couldn't resist getting copies.

    Once you have had your fill of David, go back and look at the other statues by Michelangelo that you walked past. St. Matthew was the first of 12 statues commissioned by Pope Julius II for his tomb (not all twelve were finished or even started since he then had Michelangelo stop sculpting in order to paint the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel). But in his St. Matthew you can see the moment of conflict that Matthew had when giving up the money of a tax collector to become a follower of Christ. Is it finished? No, it doesn’t look like it – but perhaps this is the way Michelangelo wanted to leave him. The slaves statues are definitely not finished (there are two nearly finished slaves in the Louvre in Paris), but they demonstrate the genius that was Michelangelo.

    NOTE: If you want to see the finished tomb, although dramatically scaled back from Michelangelo's original plan, you will have to travel to Rome to the church of San Pietro in Vincoli (St. Peter in Chains). You can visit this church virtually by visiting my VT page for San Pietro in Vincoli and see photos of the finished tomb.

    Elsewhere in the museum are other Renaissance art pieces from painters such as Uccello, Ghirlandaio, and Botticelli.

    Open Tuesday-Sunday 8:15 am – 6:50 pm; Closed Mondays, Dec 25, Jan 1, and May 1.

    Admission: €6,50

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  • heplion's Profile Photo

    The Acadamia and David

    by heplion Updated Aug 26, 2002

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    David is by far the most impressive sculpture I have seen. The detail is mesmorizng. No picture you have seen will give you even a hint of if it's true beauty. To add to the effect, the hallway leading up to David is lined with unfinished works by Michalangealo. They look as if they are men trying to break out of huge blocks of rock and at the end of the hall...David.

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    When in Florence, you should...

    by Geisha_Girl Written Aug 26, 2002

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    When in Florence, you should not miss out on the beautiful Florentine works of art!! Florence is home to two of the most world-renowned museums: The Galleria dell'Accademia and the Galleria degli Uffizi. The former is most famous for the breathtaking statue of 'David' by Michaelangelo. The latter houses some of the most beautiful works of Italian Renaissance sculpture and paintings (Raphael, Boticelli, Caravaggio). Be prepared to arrive early to either museums and stand in a long line. Here in this photo we sat patiently in a 3 hour line for the Uffizi!

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    Galleria d'Accademia

    by TRimer Updated Aug 1, 2005

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    Visitors from all over the world come here to gaze upon Michelangelo's David, the most famous nude male in the history of art (my Italian friends swear that Michelangelo was gay and that David is the image of his perfect man).

    Several other masterpieces by Michelangelo including The Prisoners are housed here. Michelangelo was twenty-five years old when in 1501 he started to work on the statue of David. It took three years to complete and when finished it was the largest sculpture since the Roman period, standing 4 meters and 10 centimeters in height. The statue is the symbol of Renaissance virile beauty and now the object of particular devotion by tourists from all over the world.

    David
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    GALLERIA DELL´ ACCADEMIA

    by joh28 Written Aug 24, 2002

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    This gallery belongs to the first academy of arts in europe: the Accademia di Belle Arti (academy of fine arts), opened up at 1784 for students.
    The statue of David in front of the building is a copy

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    THE GALLERIA dell’ ACCADEMIA

    by wayward_son Written Aug 24, 2002

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    The greatest arrangement for the museum is the unfinished works of Michelangelo that lead the way to his masterpiece, David. Looking at these blocks of marble with the odd shoulder, arm or head gives the visitor a new appreciation of the vision of the artist. It is said that Michelangelo would go pick the blocks himself because he said he could see the figures trying to get out. David was the finest example of realism in art at the time of its creation. The proportions are true to life; all except for David’s over sized right hand, which is religious symbolism for the hand of God. As if David is not enough the Accademia has additional rooms of paintings, including works by Botticelli.

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  • margaretvn's Profile Photo

    Galleria dell'Accademia

    by margaretvn Updated Sep 17, 2003

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    Visit the Galleria dell'Accademia.
    This fine arts academy was founded in 1563 and it was the first school that was established in Europe to teach the techniques of drawing, painting and sculpture.
    The art on display was formed as teaching material. The students copied and studied the art.
    Of course today the most famous work there is the David by Michelangelo.
    Remember though that photography is not allowed in the academy because of copyright, although photos are taken secretly - just keep your eyes open for the security people!!

    The original David
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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Visit the David at the...

    by sandysmith Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Visit the David at the Galleria dell'Academia - but be prepared to queue unless you have ordered tickets in advance. Notice the large hand of 'Leonardo' which are out of proportion to the rest of the sculpture.

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  • miaou's Profile Photo

    ACCADEMIA to see...

    by miaou Written Aug 24, 2002

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    ACCADEMIA to see Michelangelo's David. I was surprised to see how big the statue is in real life. David measures about 4.3m/ 14 ft. Of course, like every piece of artwork there is a story behind it and to understand it will make one appreciate the art more. Michelangelo own words were: 'When I returned to Florence, I found myself famous. The City Council asked me to carve a colossal David from a nineteen-foot block of marble -- and damaged to boot! I locked myself away in a workshop behind the cathedral, hammered and chiseled at the towering block for three long years. In spite of the opposition of a committee of fellow artists, I insisted that the figure should stand before the Palazzo Vecchio, as a symbol of our Republic. I had my way. Archways were torn down, narrow streets widened...it took forty men five days to move it. Once in place, all Florence was astounded. A civic hero, he was a warning...whoever governed Florence should govern justly and defend it bravely. Eyes watchful...the neck of a bull...hands of a killer...the body, a reservoir of energy. He stands poised to strike.'

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