Il Duomo - Santa Maria del Fiore, Florence

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  • Piazza del Duomo
    Piazza del Duomo
    by halikowski
  • Santa Trinita
    Santa Trinita
    by croisbeauty
  • Il Duomo
    Il Duomo
    by croisbeauty
  • goodfish's Profile Photo

    Ancient History

    by goodfish Updated Apr 1, 2014

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    The Duomo is a bit of a Johnny-come-lately compared to what occupied its spot before. A flight of stairs near the entrance leads down to the scavi of Santa Reparata; an early Christian/Medieval church which stood here from somewhere around the 4th century until the new cathedral was constructed over the top. The old basilica had in turn been built upon the ruins of Roman houses, underwent at least 3 reconstructions, and served as a burial crypt for some more distinguished of the Florentine clergy (two 11-century popes and some bishops) as well as a member of the Medici family and Filippo Brunelleschi: brilliant Renaissance architect and mastermind behind that dome that crowns the cathedral.

    A modest fee allows you a wander in this dim 1,600 year-old, subterranean world of ancient mosaic pavements, Medieval tomb slabs, crumbling frescoes and collected artifacts. They’ve done a nice job of providing smooth walkways through the ruins, and models/signs for illustrating the former basilica’s layout and helping you understand what it is you’re looking at.

    See the website for hours and current admission fees. Note: the scavi is considered a sacred site so proper attire is required: no bare knees or shoulders. Also, no flash, tripods or cell phone use is allowed. I walked right in and bought a ticket at the desk: far fewer were interested in what lay below than on the surface.

    http://en.duomo.waf.it/museo_dett/318-churches-and-religious-sites/7471-the-archaeological-site-of-the-crypt-of-santa-reparata.html

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  • oriettaIT's Profile Photo

    Up close and personal with the Dome

    by oriettaIT Written Mar 4, 2014

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    View of the Dome from the bell tower
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    Like the bell tower, the Dome also has no lift and require you to climb 463 steps.
    The stairwell is one way only for the first two level, but is two way for the third level. in that part of the climb you will be actually walking in a space between the roof and the ceiling of the dome. It is curved and steep as you can see in my third picture.
    I would not recommend the visit to people with height fear or claustrophobia.
    If you can make it though it is very rewarding. You will get to see a great view over the center from the top witch is slightly higher than the bell tower but, much more impressive in my opinion, you will get to see up close the Dome frescoes from the glass enclosed pathway at level 2 and 3.
    It is very interesting to see how the painter made the figures so they look normal from the cathedral floor down below, but they are very deformed in reality. Perspective adjust them and make them look normal.

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  • Maurizioago's Profile Photo

    Piazza Duomo.

    by Maurizioago Updated Feb 9, 2014

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    Here you can visit the Cathedral; S. Maria del Fiore. It was built over the church of Santa Reparata between 1296 and 1436. It is the fourth largest cathedral in the world. Beside it there is the bell tower; designed by Giotto in 1334. After his death the work was carried on by Andrea Pisano and later completed in 1359 by Francesco Talenti. It is 85 meters tall. In front of the Cathedral there is the Batipstery. It is said it is of Roman origin. The structure you see dates back to the XI century. The Baptistery is covered in white and green marble. Dante and other famous people were baptized here.

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  • EugeneM's Profile Photo

    New €10 Combined Duomo Ticket

    by EugeneM Written Jul 27, 2013

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    The Opera del Duomo di Firenze has established a new combined ticket that covers admission to all the elements of the duomo complex except for the Duomo itself, which is free. The ticket costs €10, is good for 24 hours from its first use and must be used before midnight of the sixth day after purchase. The sights covered by the ticket are:
    • Ghiberti's "Doors of Paradise", Nanni di Banco's "Door of the Almond" and Michelangelo's "Bandini Pietà" at the Museum of the Duomo, which is otherwise closed until further notice.
    • The cupola
    • The bell tower
    • The baptistry
    • The crypt
    The ticket can be purchased online
    (http://en.grandemuseodelduomo.waf.it/museo_dett.php?idtour=8484) or at any one of the above listed locations.

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  • goodfish's Profile Photo

    The Flower of Firenze

    by goodfish Written Oct 9, 2012

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    Well, THIS was different.

    With a few exceptions, I’d come to expect most Italian churches to be hiding fantastic interiors and oodles of priceless art behind plain, unassuming facades? The Duomo blew that notion all to smithereens. Florence’s cathedral is a massive, mind-blowing, polychrome riot of white, rose and green marble, ornamental carvings, reliefs and statuary - which is probably why it took 600 years (1296 - 1887) to finish the thing. Zowie, if it’s this crazy on the outside, what’s inside the doors must be just INSANE? It takes a minute for your eyes to adjust to the gloom and then you see a huge, echoing expanse of... not much at all: a few frescoes; a couple of tombs; a scattering of paintings. Its only abundance is the gaggle of tourists desperately trying to find something, anything to point their cameras at. They have to do some digging but they’ll find some treasures if they persevere:

    • 44 beautiful windows - some of them designed by Renaissance notables such as Donatello and Ghiberti (of the baptistry’s famous doors)

    • Rare, 15-century clock that records the hours of the liturgical day (‘midnight' being sunset)

    • Lovely Vasari-designed fresco of “The Last Judgement" in the cupola; unfortunately only partially visible from behind security ropes

    • Gorgeous 16th-century marble pavements - if you can see them under the hundreds of tourist-cluttering feet

    Throw in some touches by Della Robbia and Gaddi and, well, there ya go. So why the baffling lack of painted/chiseled/gilded fandangles in this most famous of Firenze’s churches? One reason is that the great flood of 1966 destroyed or badly damaged many of its former decorative objects. Another is that it is a supposed reflection of the infamous Savanarola's - he of the "Bonfire of the Vanities” - austerity reforms of the 15th century. Maybe, but that wouldn’t account for the curious lack of extensive frescoes so prevalent in other Renaissance-era churches.

    Whatever the case, the exterior is where you’ll be filling up your memory card, and Brunelleschi’s miraculous dome and Giotto’s campanile are often best admired from Piazzale Michelangelo or other high points around the city. Entrance to the Duomo is free but other related buildings and attractions - campanile; baptistry; crypt; dome; museum containing pieces rescued/restored after the flood - are not so see the website for hours and ticket prices. NOTE: for all of the attractions listed, you must follow the dress code required for visiting Italian churches: no bare knees or shoulders. Also, no flash, tripods or cell phone use is allowed.

    Photographers, the exterior is especially dramatic at night, and here’s a nice website with some great snaps and a couple of helpful shooting tips.

    http://www.digital-images.net/Gallery/Scenic/Florence/Duomo/Scenic-Sculp/scenic-sculp.html

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Baptistery of Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jun 17, 2012

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    Baptistery of Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore
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    The Florence Baptistry or Battistero di San Giovanni (Baptistry of St. John) is a religious building which has the status of a minor basilica.
    It located in Piazza del Duomo, right in front of the Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore, it is one of the most important monuments in Florence.
    The Baptistery, dedicated to Florence's patron saint, has an octagonal plan and an octagonal lantern with a cupola. Outside it is clad in geometrically patterned colored marble, white Carrara marble and green Prato marble that is typical of Florentine Romanesque architecture.
    The golden East Doors (facing the Duomo) are also known as the Gates of Paradise after a famous quotation by Michelangelo. They were also commissioned to Ghiberti and depict scenes from the Old Testament.

    Full euro 5,00
    Opening hours
    From 12.15 p.m. to 7.00 p.m.
    Sunday and 1st Saturday of the month from 8.30 a.m. to 2.00 p.m.
    Closed on 1st January, Easter, 8 September, 24th December and Christmas

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Giotto’s Campanile

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jun 17, 2012

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    Giotto?s Campanile
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    Giotto’s Campanile is a free-standing campanile that is part of the complex of buildings that make up Florence Cathedral on the Piazza del Duomo.
    Standing adjacent the Basilica of Santa Maria del Fiore and the Baptistry of St. John, the tower is one of the showpieces of the Florentine Gothic architecture with its design by Giotto, its rich sculptural decorations and the polychrome marble encrustations.

    This slender structure stands on a square plan with a side of 14.45 meters (47.41 ft). It attains a height of 84.7 meters (277.9 ft) sustained by four polygonal buttresses at the corners. These four vertical lines are crossed by four horizontal lines, dividing the tower in five levels.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore interiors

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jun 16, 2012

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    Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore interiors
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    The Gothic interior is vast and gives an empty impression. The relative bareness of the church corresponds with the austerity of religious life, as preached by Girolamo Savonarola.
    Many decorations in the church have been lost in the course of time, or have been transferred to the Museum Opera del Duomo, such as the magnificent cantorial pulpits (the singing galleries for the choristers) of Luca della Robbia and Donatello (have a look at my OBP tip “Florence in Moscow).
    As this cathedral was built with funds from the public, some important works of art in this church honor illustrious men and military leaders of Florence:
    Dante Before the City of Florence by Domenico di Michelino (1465).
    Funerary Monument to Sir John Hawkwood by Paolo Uccello (1436).
    Equestrian statue of Niccolò da Tolentino by Andrea del Castagno (1456).
    Busts of Giotto (by Benedetto da Maiano),
    Brunelleschi (by Buggiano - 1447),
    Marsilio Ficino, and Antonio Squarcialupi (a most famous organist).
    These busts all date from the 15th and the 16th century.

    You can watch my 2 min 45 sec Video Florence Dome out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jun 16, 2012

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    Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore
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    The Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore (Basilica of Saint Mary of the Flower) or the Duomo, as it is ordinarily called, was begun in 1296 in the Gothic style to the design of Arnolfo di Cambio and completed structurally in 1436 with the dome engineered by Filippo Brunelleschi.
    The exterior of the basilica is faced with polychrome marble panels in various shades of green and pink bordered by white and has an elaborate 19th century Gothic Revival façade by Emilio De Fabris.
    The cathedral complex, located in Piazza del Duomo, includes the Baptistery and Grotto’s Campanile. The three buildings are part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site covering the historic centre of Florence and are a major attraction to tourists visiting the region of Tuscany.
    The basilica is one of Italy's largest churches, and until development of new structural materials in the modern era, the dome was the largest in the world. It remains the largest brick dome ever constructed.

    Piazza Duomo
    Florence (FI)
    Free entrance
    Opening hours
    Open from 10 am - 5 pm
    Thursdays: 10 am - 4.30 pm
    Saturdays: 10 am - 4.45 pm
    Sundays and religious holidays: 1.30 - 4.45 pm
    1st Saturday of the month: 10 am - 3.30 pm
    January 1, Easter & Christmas: 3.30 - 4.45 pm
    Days of closure
    Closed January 6

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  • fabric_letters's Profile Photo

    The heart of Florence..

    by fabric_letters Written May 28, 2012

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    Street Artist in Piazza del Duomo
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    It was top of our list from the moment we arrived in Florence and its well worth spending a few hours in the Piazza admiring one of the most recognizable symbols of Renaissance architecture.

    The gothic style and delicate facade make this building a must see while in Florence.

    We viewed the interior of the cathedral (which is free) before climbing the dome for a close up view of the fresco. Climbing the dome is hard work, the walkways are very narrow and its not suitible for people with a phobia of heights.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria del Fiore

    by kris-t Updated May 27, 2012

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    The Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore is the cathedral church (or Duomo) of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Florence, noted for its distinctive dome.

    Its name ("Saint Mary of the Flower") refers to the lily, symbol of Florence, or to the old town name Fiorenza.

    The cathedral complex includes the church proper, the Battistero di San Giovanni (Florence), built in Florence after Santa Croce and Santa Maria Novella.

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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    A quick look

    by solopes Updated Apr 10, 2012
    Florence - Italy
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    Some seconds of the five minutes we had in Florence were used by Diego, our Italian friend, to explain to us some details of the exterior of the duomo and its doors.

    Interesting, but so quick that I didn't keep those details.

    I will go back, one day, I'll explain it then. Promise!

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  • Benson35's Profile Photo

    Magnificent Cathedral

    by Benson35 Written Mar 27, 2012

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    This Catherdal is beautiful. Commonly known as Duomo, this amazing basilica is open to the public and tourists.
    Every time I've been to Florence (three times up to now!), I've spent time at the Duomo. I've even just sat at a cafe looking in awe at the building and the facade. It's just stunning.
    I am yet to come across a photograph that does the Duomo justice!

    There is usually a queue to get inside, and like all churches, you must cover your knees and shoulders - women; no low-cut tops.

    And just a little information I picked up; the dome is the largest brick dome ever constructed.

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  • GrumpyDiver's Profile Photo

    Better on the outside than the inside

    by GrumpyDiver Updated Mar 24, 2012
    The dome of the Duomo
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    The Duomo, is an absolutely stunning building, at least on the outside. They seem to have spent all of the money on the exterior and the interior is somewhat disappointing,

    On the other hand, climbing up to the dome and getting a view of the city was an absolutely stunning experience!

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Basilica di Santa Trinita

    by croisbeauty Written Oct 8, 2011

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    Basilica di Santa Trinita
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    Basilica di Santa Trinita is the mother church of the Vallumbrosan Order of monks, founded in 1092 by a Florentine nobleman. The church is famous for its Sassetti Chapel containing frescoes from Domenico Ghirlandaio who is one of the most estimated frescoe painters of all times. His frescoes are ranked as the masterworks among 15th century paintings.
    The basilica was constructed in 1258-1280 but multiple reconstructions occured later on. The 17th century wooden doors were carved to recall saints of the Vallumbrosan order.
    The Santa Trinita Maesta by Cimabue was once at the high altar of the church, now exibited at the Uffizi Gallery.

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