Palazzo Vecchio, Florence

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  • In the Sala dell'Udienza, Palazzo Vecchio
    In the Sala dell'Udienza, Palazzo...
    by Jefie
  • Palazzo Vecchio: Frontispiece
    Palazzo Vecchio: Frontispiece
    by JoostvandenVondel
  • Palazzo Vecchio
    by Homanded
  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Palazzo Vecchio courtyards

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jun 17, 2012

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    Palazzo Vecchio courtyard
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    The first courtyard of the Palazzo Vecchio was designed in 1453 by Michelozzo. In the lunettes, high around the courtyard, are crests of the Church and City Guilds. In the center, the porphyry fountain is by Battista del Tadda. The Putto with Dolphin on top of the basin is a copy of the original by Andrea del Verrocchio (1476), now on display on the second floor of the palace. This small statue was originally placed in the garden of the villa of the Medici in Careggi. The water, flowing through the nose of the dolphin, is brought here by pipes from the Boboli Gardens.

    In the niche, in front of the fountain, stands Samson and Philistine by Pierino da Vinci.
    The frescoes on the walls, representing scenes of the Austrian Habsburg estates, were painted in 1565 by Giorgio Vasari for the wedding celebration of Francesco I de' Medici, the eldest son of Cosimo I de' Medici, and Johanna of Austria, sister of the Emperor Maximilian. The harmoniously proportioned columns, at one time smooth, and untouched, were at the same time richly decorated with gilt stuccoes.

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    Palazzo Vecchio

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jun 17, 2012

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    Palazzo Vecchio
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    The Palazzo Vecchio or "Old Palace" is the town hall of Florence. This massive, Romanesque, crenellated fortress-palace is among the most impressive town halls of Tuscany. Overlooking the Piazza della Signoria with its copy of Michelangelo's David statue as well the gallery of statues in the adjacent Loggia dei Lanzi, it is one of the most significant public places in Italy.
    Originally called the Palazzo della Signoria, after the Signoria of Florence, the ruling body of the Republic of Florence, it was also given several other names: Palazzo del Popolo, Palazzo dei Priori, and Palazzo Ducale, in accordance with the varying use of the palace during its long history.

    Piazza della Signoria
    Full euro 6,00
    Reduced euro 4,50
    Opening hours
    Weekdays 9am-7pm
    Thursdays and weekday public holidays: 9am-2pm
    Closed on New Year’s Day, Easter Day, 15 August, Christmas Day

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    A bit of the Palazzo Vecchio without paying.

    by leics Written Apr 25, 2011

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    A cheerful face!
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    My friend and I didn't want to pay to go inside.; we're not much into museums when we travel together.

    But we found out that you can just wander through the courtyard and entrances, without paying anything......and it is well worth doing this.

    The courtyard pillars are amazing. They are intricately decorated with cherubs, vinery, leaves, flowers, strange faces, twists and twiddles all set on a golden background. They must have hugely impressed visitors to the Palazzo...such an ostentatious display of wealth. Do spend some time examining them closely, because each face, cherub and pillar is entirely unique,

    And a little further on there are two fountains, each with its own pair of stone lions and each lion with a different expression: one grumpy, one fiercely on guard, one bored, one rather bemused.

    You can walk right through from Piazza della Signorina into Via dei Leoni; well worthwhile, imo.

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  • eksvist's Profile Photo

    The Palazzo Vecchio

    by eksvist Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Palazzo Vecchio
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    The Palazzo Vecchio is the town hall of Florence. This massive, Tuscan Gothic, crenellated fortress-palace is among the most impressive town halls of Tuscany. Overlooking the Piazza della Signoria with its copy of Michelangelo's David statue as well the gallery of statues in the adjacent Loggia dei Lanzi, it is one of the most significant public places in Italy.

    Although most of the Palazzo Vecchio is now a museum, it remains the symbol of local government: since 1872 it has housed the office of the mayor of Florence, and it is the seat of the City Council.

    Open: 9.00-19.00
    Prices:
    € 6,00
    € 4,50 18-25 y and over 65 y.
    € 2,00 3-17 y
    € 14,00 Family (4 person)
    € 16,00 Family (5 person)

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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    When power and beauty come together

    by Jefie Updated Jun 24, 2010

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    Palazzo Vecchio on Piazza della Signoria
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    The Palazzo Vecchio, Florence's City Hall, was originally built to both house and protect the city's dignitaries, which might explain why it looks more like a fortress than a palace. The palazzo was completed in 1322 and almost seven centuries later, it retains at least part of its original purpose since the office of the mayor is still located at Palazzo Vecchio. However, most of the building is now open to the public, including most of the rooms that were remodeled in the 16th century when the palazzo became the residence of Cosimo I de Medici. Giorgio Vasari was put in charge of transforming the palazzo into a suitable royal residence. His remarkable work can first be admired in the "Salone dei Cinquecento", where the walls and ceiling are covered with paintings depicting several of Cosimo I's victories. Vasari also decorated the family's private appartments, often using themes drawn from Greek mythology for inspiration, and several other rooms throughout the palace. My own favourite room was the "Sala dell'Udienza" (Justice Hall), which contains some of the palazzo's oldest works of art (check out my little video!).

    Admission to Palazzo Vecchio is 6 Euros and there's no need to book in advance.

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  • JoostvandenVondel's Profile Photo

    Palazzo Vecchio: Interior

    by JoostvandenVondel Updated Aug 5, 2009

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    Palazzo Vecchio: First Courtyard
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    Upon entering the Palazzo Vecchio, the visitor is greeted with a series of three courtyards on the ground floor. The first, and most monumental, courtyard was designed in 1453 by Michelozzo. It is surrounded by grandiose arches and decorated columns while in the centre one can find the porphyry fountain by Battista del Tadda.

    Perhaps the most imposing elements of the building's interior, however, is the Salone dei Cinquecento, 52 m. (170 ft.) long and 23 m. (75 ft.) broad. It was built in 1494 by Simone del Pollaiolo for the seat of the Grand Council (Consiglio Maggiore) which replaced the powerful Medici family as rulers of Florence during the family's first time in exile (1494–1512). The Grand Council consisted of 500 members and thus lent their name to this superb hall. Most of the decorations were made later, after the Medici family was back in power, between 1555 and 1572 by Giorgio Vasari in the highest style of mannerism.

    The second floor contains more intimate yet no less grandiose rooms such as the Chapel of the Signoria, the Room of the Lilies (Sala dei Gigli) and the Sala dell'Udienza or Hall of Justice. Although I can't really recount all of the details of each room here, allow me to point out just a few.

    Firstly, the Sala dell'Udienza is decorated with large wall frescoes by Francesco Salviati (mid 16th century) of the Stories of Furius Camillus. Furius was a Roman soldier and statesman of patrician descent (ca. 446-365 BC) who, according to Livy and Plutarch, triumphed (military victory) four times, was five times dictator and was honoured with the title of Second Founder of Rome. Proud and haughty, his triumphal parades were seen as overly pompous to a Rome not yet used to grossly overt displays of pagentry. One may guess the natural penchant of the leaders of the Florentine Republic for this hero of Antiquity. But don't forget to look upwards and marvel at the incredible coffered ceiling.

    In my pictures (number 3) you will also a fresco located outside the Chapel of the Signoria, a small chapel on the 2nd floor, dedicated to St. Bernard. This chapel was for the use of the ruling body of Florence (the Signoria). Its nine priori would get their spiritual guidance here. This was also the chapel where Girolamo Savonarola said his last prayers before being burned at the stake (an apt ending for the man who carried out the Bonfire of the Vanities).
    Directly above the door is Christ’s monogram IHS, an inscription, and a plaque in honor of Christ. Inside the chapel are magnificent frescoes by Ridolfo Ghirlandaio, which include The Holy Trinity and the Annunciation on the wall facing the altar.

    Other rooms such as the Hall of the Lilies (Sala dei Gigli), the extraordinary Hall of Geographical Maps (Stanza del Guardaroba), the Study (Studiolo) and various other chapels and rooms are all richly decorated and wonderous to behold.

    If you are largely interested in art, a visit to the interior of the palazzo would be a wonderful occasion to sample more of Florence's Mannerist and Renaissance delights. However, those of you who may not be as keen on the finer details of Renaissance art, it would probably be best to save your euros and energy for entry to the Uffizi.

    The Palazzo is open daily from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., on Thursdays it closes at 2 p.m.
    Holidays 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.
    The ticket office closes 45 minutes before the museum's closing time.
    Entrance fee: € 6,00; combined ticket with Cappella Brancacci € 8,00 (which is a good deal).

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  • JoostvandenVondel's Profile Photo

    Palazzo Vecchio: Exterior

    by JoostvandenVondel Written Aug 5, 2009

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    Palazzo Vecchio: Tower and Battlement
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    The jewel in the Piazza della Signoria's political crown is the imposing Palazzo Vecchio, the town hall of Florence and the former epicentre of the Florentine Republic.

    Plans for the palazzo were drawn up in 1299 by Arnolfo Cambio (also the architect of the Duomo and the Santa Croce Church). However, the palazzo's history mirrors that of Florence's as it underwent numerous embellishments over the following 300 years.

    The building consists of two major components, the 94 metre rectangular tower known as the Torre d'Arnolfo and the massive cube-shaped building constructed in a solid, rustic stonework. There are two rows of gothic windows and the building is topped with what is called a projecting crenellated battlement (crenellating indicates the indententations or square-shaped loopholes at the top). The battlement is supported by small arches and corbles (stonework jutting out of the wall to support the battlement's weight).

    Above the main entrance is a monumental frontispiece dating from 1528 and each side of the entrance is flanked by two statues: to the visitor's left is a copy of Michelangelo's David (from 1910, the original is now, of course, located in the Accademia) and to the right, Baccio Bandinelli's Hercules and Cacus (1534).

    The Palazzo Vecchio is a delight to behold and impossible to miss on a visit to the Piazza della Signoria!

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  • Donna_in_India's Profile Photo

    Worth a visit....

    by Donna_in_India Updated Jul 5, 2009

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    A ceiling in Palazzo Vecchio
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    Located in the Piazza Della Signoria is the Palazzo Vecchio and in front of it are several statues including a replica of Michelangelo's David.

    We waited on line for 45 minutes to enter the Palazzao Vecchio. It turned out that there was one security person that was checking the bags, handbags, etc. of every single person going in. It was insane!!

    A former palace, Palazzo Vecchio today contains the offices of the City Council but you can still see apartments, reception rooms, etc. The characteristic feature of Palazzo Vecchio is a tower that rises high above the palace. Inside the palace are more sculptures including one of Hercules and Diomedes in a very interesting position (sorry, the pic didn’t come out!), tapestries, more frescoes, and some beautiful paintings (mostly religious) done on various shapes of wood. What we noted was that in paintings of women they were all depicted as having very muscular arms and legs. It wasn't particularly pretty! But we still enjoyed our visit.

    Hours:
    Friday-Wednesday 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
    Thursday 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

    Admission Charge, Combo ticket with Capella Brancacci available
    "Secrets of the Palace" tour tickets available at the main ticket office

    Please note that all visitor information is correct as of this writing.

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  • jorgec25's Profile Photo

    Palazzo Vecchio

    by jorgec25 Written Jul 3, 2009

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    Palazzo Vecchio
    4 more images

    When visiting Palazzo Vecchio you must see the map room. You get a glimpse of what the world “looked like” in the 15 century, and the level of detail in the maps is amazing. The main hall, with all its statues, is also a must see.

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  • Tijavi's Profile Photo

    As solid as ever

    by Tijavi Updated Jun 2, 2009

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    Towering over Pizza della Signoria
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    Built between 1298 and 1314, this massive building towering over Piazza della Signoria retains its original function as a seat of Florentine government, after an interlude as Cosimo I's residence in the 16th century. The Torre d'Arnolfo that crowns Palazzo Vecchio is another symbol of the city held in the same light as the Duomo. From afar, these two landmarks define the city's skyline.

    One of the more interesting features of Palazzo Vecchio is the Republican frieze that adorns the main entrance (picture 5). Inscribed on it is a reaffirmation of the city's allegiance to its Catholic traditions, which reads "Christ is King" - not even Cosimo.

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  • roamer61's Profile Photo

    Palazzo Vecchio

    by roamer61 Written May 10, 2009

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    This imposing structure is the town hall of Florence. Built between the 13th and 14th century, this building served as the seat of government for the city of Florence. Later additions were added in the 15th and 16th centuries as the palazzo served as the seat of government for the Medici. There are numerous works of art inside as well as marvelous frescoes designed by the likes of Vasari and Francesco Salviati. It is outside this building that one also finds the copy of Michelangelos David as well as other statuary. Today, the building is a marvelous museum. Admission is charged. Prepare to queue.

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  • Maurizioago's Profile Photo

    Palazzo Vecchio.

    by Maurizioago Updated Mar 13, 2009

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    Piazza della Signoria has been the heart of political and social life of Florence for centuries. There you can see the Loggia dei Lanzi; built between 1376 and 1382 to house public ceremonies and assemblies. There are several statues inside and outside the loggia; including a replica of David by Donatello. Palazzo Vecchio is the highlight of Piazza della Signoria. It was built between 1298 and 1314. Cosimo I de Medici bought it and renovated the interior in the early 16th century. It still houses the mayor’s office and is the seat of the City Council. Various rooms are open to visitors. There you can see many frescoes, paintings, ancient furniture. You could also meet Eleonor of Toledo and have a chat with her...

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  • cinthya_in_victoria's Profile Photo

    Palazzo Vecchio

    by cinthya_in_victoria Updated Jan 7, 2009
    city hall or a castle???
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    Another place you can't miss is the Palazzo Vecchio which is the city hall of Florence tough it looks like a castle. There used to be Michelangelo's David at the entrance but now there is a copy of it, which unfortunately was covered the day I was there! (I couldn't see neither the original nor the copy...gosh!)

    It has had a lot of names such as: Palazzo del Popolo, Palazzo dei Priori, and Palazzo Ducale, according to the use it has had. From Uffizi you can have a great view of the tower.

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  • lina112's Profile Photo

    Palacio Vecchio

    by lina112 Updated Nov 18, 2008

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    Overlooking the Piazza della Signoria with its copy of Michelangelo's David statue as well the gallery of statues in the adjacent Loggia dei Lanzi, it is one of the most significant public places in Italy. In 1299 Arnolfo di Cambio, the architect of the Duomo and the Santa Croce church, began constructing it and it was finished by other artist in 1314 after Arnolfo´s death. One of the most important stay is Salone dei Cinquecento, which decoration was commissioned to Leonardo da Vinci (the Battle of Anghiari ) and Miguel angel (Battle of Cascina). Any of two paints was completed and the walls was recovered by other artist. Between 1540 and 1550 the building was used as residence of Cosme de Medicis calling then Palazzo Ducale.

    Tickets: 6 euros

    Su construcción comenzó en 1299 por Arnolfo di Cambio, tras la muerte de Arnolfo, en 1302, el palacio fue terminado, por otros artistas, en 1314. En su interior el palacio acoge un museo en el que se exponen obras de: Bronzino, Miguel Ángel, Giorgio Vasari y otros. Entre sus estancias más importantes, sobresale el Salón de los Quinientos, cuya decoración mural se encomendó a Leonardo da Vinci (La batalla de Anghiari) y a Miguel Ángel (La batalla de Cascina). Lamentablemente, ninguna de ambas pinturas se completó y las paredes fueron recubiertas por otros artistas.Entre 1540 y 1550 el edificio fue utilizado como residencia de Cosme de Médicis llamándose, entonces, Palacio Ducal.

    Entrada: 6 euros

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    Loggia dei Lanzi & Palazzo Vecchio

    by mallyak Written Aug 31, 2008

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    Loggia dei Lanzi
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    The Loggia dei Lanzi, also called the Loggia della Signoria, is a building on a corner of the Piazza della Signoria in Florence, Italy, adjoining the Uffizi Gallery. It consists of wide arches open to the street, three bays wide and one bay deep. The arches rest on clustered pilasters with Corinthian capitals. The wide arches appealed so much to the Florentines, that Michelangelo even proposed that they should be continued all around the Piazza della Signoria.

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