Piazza della Signoria, Florence

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  • Entering the Piazza Della Signoria
    Entering the Piazza Della Signoria
    by riorich55
  • Piazza della Signoria
    by riorich55
  • LOGIA @ Piazza della Signora
    LOGIA @ Piazza della Signora
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  • jorgec25's Profile Photo

    Art on the Outdoors

    by jorgec25 Written Jul 3, 2009

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    Piazza Della Signoria
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    Piazza Della Signoria is the very heart of downtown Florence. You tend to pass there wherever you go, or from wherever you are coming from. It’s a beautiful square, with several great statues, and overlooked bey the Palazzo Vecchio. Take special attention to the fountain with Neptune.

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    Piazza della Signoria (Palazzo Vecchio)

    by Santini738 Written Jul 29, 2007

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    Piazza della Signoria is an L-shaped square.It was named after the Palazzo della Signoria, also called Palazzo Vecchio.

    It is the focal point of the origin and of the history of the Florentine Republic and still maintains its reputation as the political hub of the city.It is the meeting place of Florentines as well as the numerous tourists.

    The impressive 14th century Palazzo Vecchio is still preeminent with its crenellated tower. The square is also shared with the Loggia della Signoria, the Uffizi Gallery, the Palace of the Tribunale della Mercanzia (1359) (now the Bureau of Agriculture), and the Uguccioni Palace (16th c.) (with a facade probably by Raphael). Located in front of the Palazzo Vecchio is the Palace of the Assicurazioni Generali (1871, built in Renaissance style).

    The various eye-catching statues in this square include:

    * At the entrance of the Palazzo Vecchio, a copy of David.The original by Michelangelo is being kept at the Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts.
    * The "bronze equestrian statue of Cosimo I" by Giambologna (1594)
    * The Fountain of Neptune by Bartolomeo Ammannati (1575)
    * "The Lion", referred to as "il Marzocco" with a copy of the "Florentine Lily", originally made by Donatello (copy)
    * "Judith and Holofernes", by Donatello (copy)
    * "Hercules and Cacus", by Bandinelli (1533)

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    The Political Centre

    by Acirfa Written Oct 9, 2007

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    Hercules and Cacus
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    This square gets it's name from the Palace, where in the 4th century the government resided, they were called the Signoria.
    In Roman times there were baths and theatres and textile dyeing workshops.

    The Building today is still home to the Mayor and is the seat of the Commune. Here in the square were held the riots of the 1300's, the ceremonies and proclamations of the Medici, executions ( specifically that of the Italian dominican priest and leader of Florence who was hanged and burnt in 1498 after being tortured for weeks on the racks) and assassination too have all been carried out in this most awe inspiring place.

    This must be the most spectacular open air museum I have ever seen and it's free! With statues of the 'Rape of the Sabine', 'Hercules and the Centaur', 'Perseus with the head of Medusa' all displayed in the Loggia of the Lanzi.

    Walk across the square and the amazing Neptune fountain stands proudly alongside replica's of David and Hercules and Cacus.

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  • codrutz's Profile Photo

    Piazza della Signoria

    by codrutz Updated Aug 22, 2006

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    Former political center of the city. Probably the most used point for starting tours of Florence, thus recommended to be left for afternoon walks. Lots of landmarks here: Palazzo Vecchio, Loggia dei Lanzi, nearby Ufizzi Galleries and Museum of the History of Science and a lot of statues. Off the beaten path tip: Check out my second picture to see the round granite plaque in the middle of the square (sort of), which commemorates the place where the preacher Girolamo Savonarola was simultaneously hanged and burned at the stake in 1498, being charged with heresy, uttering prophecies, sedition, and religious error. Savonarola (1452-1498) was an Italian Dominican priest, preaching anti-Reinasance, book burning and destruction of art. No wonder he got the hang from the people of Florence - actually by the papality from Rome.

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    Explore the piazza

    by BorneoGrrl Written Feb 26, 2007

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    Fountain of Neptune
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    Apart from people watching at Piazza della Signora, there are other interesting things to look out for. First of all, when you enter the square, you can't miss the Palazzo Vecchio, which dominates the view. A tall campanile holds a bell used to call the people to the square for their public meetings

    You will also find many beautiful marble & bronze statues around the piazza. One statue that stands at the fountain in the middle of the square is that of Neptune by Ammannati, while pretty water nymphs playfully sit beside the water

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  • m-joy's Profile Photo

    Piazza della Signoria

    by m-joy Written Aug 12, 2004

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    In my eyes, the Piazza is the most beautiful, most alive and most colourful place in Firenze with some expensive and traditional cafes, the Neptun-fountain, the Cosimos I, or he Parlazzo Veccio with its huge tower. It’s beauty and fascination is different during the day in the sun and in the evening when everything is illuminated.

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  • codrutz's Profile Photo

    Loggia dei Lanzi

    by codrutz Updated Aug 22, 2006

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    Also known as Loggia dei Signoria it was intended as a meeting point for public assemlies and ceremonies during the Signoria. This loggias are encountered all over Italy, having a similar structure. This one in Florence have a couple of interesting marble sculptures: Rape of the Sabine Woman, Hercules and the Centaur, both by Giambologna. On the left, near the path to the Ufizzi there is the bronze Perseus by the great Italian goldsmith, sculptor, painter and musician of the Renaissance - Cellini, as he displays Medusa's slain head.

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    Loggia della Signoria

    by Tijavi Updated Jun 13, 2009

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    This shaded platform built in the 14th century was originally for public ceremonies, but today protects some magnificent sculptures from the elements. This is where tourists congregate to admire works by Cellini (Perseus) and Giambologna (Rape of Sabine Women), among others.

    While Cellini's bronzework Perseus exudes a profound sense of confidence and victory, I was bowled over by Giambologna's marble sculpture Rape of Sabine Women, for its artistry and powerful emotion conveyed by the characters. It is also quite unbelievable that the sculpture of three distinct characters was made from a single slab of marble. I was so madly in love with this sculpture that I came back one evening, when most tourists have left, to take pictures of the sculpture from different angles (the best way to admire serpentine style of the statue), which was quite impossible to do when the place is filled with tourists. More of the pictures I took in this travelogue.

    TRIVIA: The artist Giambologna is actually the Italian name of the Flemish sculptor Jean de Boulogne.

    In addition to these two masterpieces, there are also other works to feast your eyes on and stretch your artistic bend a bit. These include Pio Fedi's The Rape of Polyxena and the Roman statue of Menelaus supporting the body of Patroclus.

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  • geeyook's Profile Photo

    Neptune Fountain (Fontana del Nettuno)

    by geeyook Updated Jul 22, 2004

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    Neptune Fountain (Fontana del Nettuno)

    Neptune Fountain (Fontana del Nettuno) was sculpted by Bartolomeo Ammanati between 1560 and 1575 and was unveiled on the occasion of the marriage between Francesco I dei Medici and Giovanna d’Austria. Ammanati considered the fountain one of his failures. Ridiculed by Florentines, it was dubbed "Il Biancone" (The Big White Thing).

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  • ForestqueenNYC's Profile Photo

    Palazzo Vecchio, Uffizi, Meeting Place

    by ForestqueenNYC Updated Aug 2, 2006

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    Palazzo Vecchio, Piazza della Signoria, Florence
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    Piazza Signoria is the final stop of the evening passeggiata where Italians and tourists alike meet their friends and decide what to do for the rest of the evening. At night you can find buskers playing their music and lots of people, many of whom are students, hanging out. There are a number of outdoor cafes and an Irish pub on the square. The Palazzo Vecchio, where my son got married, is also there as is the Uffizi.

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  • Tijavi's Profile Photo

    Focal point of Florence's tourism market

    by Tijavi Updated Mar 29, 2009

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    Palazzo Vecchio dominates the piazza
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    Perhaps there is no other place in Florence that has witnessed so much history unfold than Piazza della Signoria. Among other events, this is where the Dominican monk Savonarola staged the bonfire of the vanities - the burning of books, paintings, musical instruments, fine clothes - in 1497, only to be burned himself as a heretic a year after.

    Fast forward to today, Piazza della Signoria is the focal point of Florence's tourism industry where thousands of tourists mill around to enjoy faux statues of David (which was bashfully covered while I was there), Giambologna's statue of the mounted Cosimo I (founder of the house of Medicis) and the imposing sculpture of Neptune by Ammananati. There is also the Palazzo Vecchio and of course, Loggia della Signoria, a platform built in the 14th century housing some exquisite sculptures such as The Rape of Sabine Women by Giambologna and Perseus by Cellini.

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  • JoostvandenVondel's Profile Photo

    Piazza della Signoria : Renaissance Reason

    by JoostvandenVondel Written Aug 1, 2009

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    Palazzo Vecchio on the Piazza della Signoria
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    Whereas the Piazza del Duomo may be considered Florence's medieval heart, the Piazza della Signoria ma represent her Renaissance spirit. As the centre of the Florentine Republic (1115-1533), it still remains a political meeting place today despite attracting thousands of apolitical tourists.

    Upon arriving from the Via dei Calzaiuoli, the visitor's eyes are naturally drawn to the mythical 14th century Palazzo Vecchio and its crenallated tower to the far left corner. To the far centre is located the Loggia della Signoria and as one traverses the great square towards these structures, one passes a number of magnificent statues.

    One of my favourites is the Fountain of Neptune (1563-1565) by Bartolomeo Ammannati which was commissioned on the occasion of the wedding of Francesco I de Medici (whose face served as Neptune's model) with the grand duchess Johanna of Austria in 1565. The figure stands on a high pedestal in the middle of an octogonal fountain. The pedestal is decorated with the mythical chained figures of Scylla and Charybdis whilst the perimetre of the fountain is decorated by reclining bronze river gods, satyrs and sea-horses.

    Il Biancone (the White Giant) has been the target of numerous vandalous attacks, and today its 19th century copy is to be seen in the Piazza, whilst the original is located safely in the National Museum.

    Of course, any visitor cannot miss the Piazza della Signoria and it is a wonderous place to find oneself. The cafes around the piazza are expensive, so it may be worth tucking into a back street and grabbing a take-away gelatto, coming back and enjoying the ambiance!

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    See the Statues in Piazza

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 15, 2009

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    Statues in Loggia Lanzi of Piazza delle Signoria
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    Piazza dell Signoria is in the middle of the center area, between Duomo and by Palazzo Vecchio and close to the Uffizi gallery. It is a nice place to congregate and see the people and sites. Michelangelo designed this famed structure of David (a facimile) when he was about 30 years of age. It made him reknowned throughout Italy. Displaying the David statue created a dilemma, and it moved around the city for a while in 1504 until rested for viewing by all outside in the Signori square.
    Next to this is the Loggia of Lanzi, a string of fabulous statues that are displayed in open under the arched loggia. It was built in 1376-82, and called this due to the Germans occupying the area to camp while they were here. The Palazzo Vecchio is in Signoria square and inside there is a museum available for seeing, called Academia. It has many sculptures-including the actual DAvid, paintings, and other art. Cost is 10 Euro to enter.

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  • maritagnes's Profile Photo

    The Neptune fontain

    by maritagnes Written Jul 3, 2003

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    Ammannati's fontain from 1575 of Neptune, the Roman sea-god, surrounded by sea nymphs. This is only one of the beautiful statues which inhabits the Piazza della Signoria, all of them raised in remembrance of important historical happenings in this city.

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  • msbrandysue's Profile Photo

    One of the many Piazzas to Mingle in

    by msbrandysue Written Jun 13, 2008

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    While visiting the most famous sites of Florence you will end up in the Piazza della Signoria.

    "Piazza della Signoria is an L-shaped square in front of the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence, Italy.

    It is the focal point of the origin and of the history of the Florentine Republic and still maintains its reputation as the political hub of the city. It is the meeting place of Florentines as well as the numerous tourists.

    The impressive 14th century Palazzo Vecchio is still preeminent with its crenellated tower. The square is also shared with the Loggia della Signoria, the Uffizi Gallery, the Palace of the Tribunale della Mercanzia (1359) (now the Bureau of Agriculture), and the Uguccioni Palace (16th c.) (with a facade probably by Raphael). Located in front of the Palazzo Vecchio is the Palace of the Assicurazioni Generali (1871, built in Renaissance style).

    The various eye-catching statues in this square include:

    At the entrance of the Palazzo Vecchio, a copy of David. The original by Michelangelo is being kept at the Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts.
    The "bronze equestrian statue of Cosimo I" by Giambologna (1594)
    The Fountain of Neptune by Bartolomeo Ammannati (1575)
    "The Lion", referred to as "il Marzocco" with a copy of the "Florentine Lily", originally made by Donatello (copy)
    "Judith and Holofernes", by Donatello (copy)
    "Hercules and Cacus", by Bandinelli (1533)
    "The Rape of the Sabine women", by Giambologna (copy)

    This splendid open-air museum evokes centuries of greatness and power. It was already a central square in the original Roman town Florentia, surrounded by a theatre, Roman baths and a workshop for dyeing textiles. Later there was a church San Romolo, a loggia and an enormous 5th c. basilica. This was shown by the archaeological treasures found beneath the square when it was repaved in the 1980's. Even remains of a Neolithic site were found. The square started taking shape from 1268 on, when houses of Ghibellines were pulled down by the victorious Guelphs. The square remained a long time untidy, full of holes. In 1385 it was paved for the first time. In 1497 Girolamo Savonarola and his followers carried out on this square the famous Bonfire of the Vanities, burning in a large pile books, gaming tables, fine dresses, and works of poets. In front of the fountain of Neptune, a round marble plaque marks the exact spot where Girolamo Savonarola was hanged and burned on May 23, 1498." [Taken from Wikipedia]

    Try to take it all in......I dare you :p

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