Santa Maria Novella, Florence

4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars - 40 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Santa Maria Novella
    Santa Maria Novella
    by croisbeauty
  • Santa Maria Novella
    Santa Maria Novella
    by croisbeauty
  • Santa Maria Novella
    Santa Maria Novella
    by croisbeauty
  • Polly74's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Novella - Interior

    by Polly74 Written Aug 3, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The interior is designed as a Latin cross and is divided up into three naves.
    The centre nave is 100 metres long.
    The chapels include the della Pura Chapel, the Rucellai Chapel, the Bardi Chapel, the Filippo Strozzi Chapel, and the Gondi Chapel.

    Artists who produced items for the church include Masaccio, Paolo Uccello, Brunelleschi, Ghirlandaio, Filippino Lippi, Vasari.... to mention some of the most famous italian artists.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Polly74's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Novella

    by Polly74 Written Aug 3, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Santa Maria Novella

    Santa Maria Novella was built on the site of the 10th-century Dominican oratory of Santa Maria delle Vigne. Building began in the mid-13th century, and was finished in the mid-14th century.

    It was designed by two Dominican friars, Fra Sisto da Firenze and Fra Ristoro da Campi. On a commission from the Rucellai family Leone Battista Alberti designed the black and white marble facade of the church (1456-1470). Giorgio Vasari was the architect for the first remodelling of the church, which included removing its original rood-screen and loft. The second remodelling was designed by Enrico Romoli, and was carried out between 1858 and 1860.

    Was this review helpful?

  • alloquisha's Profile Photo

    The most beautiful church exterior...

    by alloquisha Updated Jul 30, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Art exhibit ad

    When you emerge from the train station, one of the first things you will see is the Church of Santa Maria Novella...and it doesn't look all that amazing. However, if you go around to see the facade that faces the Piazza of the same name, you will probably be blown away! It is truly drop dead gorgeous, I stood there for a good twenty minutes just taking in all its marble detail. The colors are just amazing; in my opinion, the exterior rivals the Duomo (and probably is more attractive...a bit more human in scale.) In this photo, you can see some of its arches decorated in zebra-like stripes. It's really a fun piece of work! I was unable to capture a good image of its whole unfortunately, so I went for a shot that included a temporary art exhibit advertisement.

    HOWEVER...the interior is, well I'll be frank: one of the ugliest I have ever seen! It was a big disappointment after being awed by the exterior. I found it to be totally uncohesive and lacking a real sense of place. Definitely not worth the time or money...sit outside and gape at the exterior instead and you will be more than fulfilled.

    Was this review helpful?

  • morganna's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Novella

    by morganna Updated Jul 30, 2004

    This jewel was designed by Leonbattista Alberti, one of most important architects of reanaissance architecture. He also wrote some books about the art of building, so here we have again one of those "Renaissance Man".

    In fact, Alberti just designed the façade of an existing medieval church, using a rational and geometrical composition.

    After admiring the façade, when you get inside, you will able to enjoy a lot of masterpieces of artists like Masaccio, Giotto or Ghirlandaio!

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • geeyook's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Novella

    by geeyook Written Jul 20, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Santa Maria Novella

    This gothic church was built on the site of a 10th century of a Dominican church, Santa Maria delle Vigne. Building started in the mid 13th century and completed in the mid 14th century. The facade was completed in the 15th century. It houses many important works of art from the 14th, 15th and 16th century.

    Was this review helpful?

  • m-joy's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Novella

    by m-joy Written Jul 6, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This big church was built in the 13th century. It has a wonderful marble façade which was completed in the middle of the 15th century. The interior is just gigantic and seems to be much larger because of an architectural trick: the architect reduced the pillar’s distances from the entrance to the altar. Moreover the church has a multitude of frescos inside.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • bpwillet's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Novella Cloister

    by bpwillet Updated Feb 22, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Cloisters of Santa Maria Novella

    These are among the nicest examples of Italian Gothic architecture. Begun in 1340 and completed internally in 1360, the cloisters were designed by the same Dominican friars who constructed the church. Among the artists involved in the decorations during the first half of the 15th century the most famous name is that of Paolo Uccello, one of Florence's Renaissance masters. You can also walk through most of the chapels and see the many frescoed walls, some severly flood damaged.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • bpwillet's Profile Photo

    S. Maria Novella Nave

    by bpwillet Written Feb 22, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Central Nave-Santa Maria Novella

    The nave is designed to have the piers spaced closer together as they reach the altar at the other end. This is intended to create an illusion of a really long church, assisted by the gray and white banding of the arches. The interior also houses some exceptional works from the 14th and 16th centuries. Of note are "Trinity" by Masaccio (1428), the frescoes of the Cappella Strozzi and Cappella Tornabuoni.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • bpwillet's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Novella

    by bpwillet Written Feb 22, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Facade of Santa Maria Novella

    Dominican friars began to build the church in 1246 on the site of a l0th century Dominican oratory. The nave and aisles were finished in 1279 and the building was finished in the middle of the 14th century. The campanile and the Sacristy were done by Jacopo Talenti. The facade was remodelled between 1456 and 1470 by Leon Battista Alberti to replace an earlier one from the 14th century. The inlay work on top is bordered by heraldic sails of the Rucellai family who commissioned the building of the church.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • littlesam1's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Della Novella

    by littlesam1 Updated Jan 6, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Santa Maria Della Novella

    The outside of Santa Maria Della Novella did not look impressive. It was smaller than the other churches we saw in Florence. The outside was attractive but not as eye catching as the Duomo or Santa Croce. However once inside any doubts about it are erased. It is filled with artwork and beauty. This picture shows some of the beautiful stained glass the nave. Like everything else in Florence it was memorable and masterful.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Andraf's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Novella

    by Andraf Updated Nov 27, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Santa Maria Novella, Firenze

    This gothic church contains some of the most important works of art in Florence. It was built by the Dominicans starting in 1246 and finished in the mid 14th century. The beautiful facade was completed in two phases, a century apart from one to another but I believe it comes together just fine. Inside you can see Masaccio's Trinity one of the first works of art to employ perspective, announcing the arrival of the Renaissance. Look also for the wooden crucifix by Filippo Brunelleschi and for the beautiful chapels that line the walls, frescoed by famous Florentine artists.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Church of Santa Maria Novella

    by kedi+ Written Apr 14, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Santa Maria Novella

    This was the first building I visited when I entered Firenze.. We parked the car in the underground carpark just across the station and started our daily feet tour and it was there... 8))
    About its history, the church was begun in 1278 and was finished in 1360. It's in Lombard style with several stories decorated with small arches and harmonious windows..
    Façade is built with green and white marble and harmonizes well with the architectural complex of the church.
    Interior is in the form of "T" with a nave, two aisles and cross vaulted ceiling..
    Go to find it to have more.. ;))

    Was this review helpful?

  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Novella

    by HORSCHECK Written Apr 3, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Piazza Santa Maria Novella

    The church of Santa Maria Novella was finished in the middle of the 14th century. The facade is one of the earliest and most beautiful in Florence. It is a beautiful black and white building which dominates the Piazza Santa Maria Novella.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Backpacking
    • Trains

    Was this review helpful?

  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Best Chapels or Shrines in Italy

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    chapel, Santa Maria Novella

    The chapels within Santa Maria Novella are the best you'll discover in Italy. Most remain in dimly-lit conditions to allow the artwork of centuries to remain sheltered in shadow, but many are coin-operated to give adequate lighting for a few timeless photos. Be ready. These chapels are so beautiful that coins come readily from other visitors, so while they pay your way, you're ready with the camera.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Firsts Come First

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Santa Maria Novella

    One of the first things you'll note when leaving the train station is the famed 13th century Santa Maria Novella church, known for its unique Florentine facade, its charming front fountains, and the square that it overlooks, once used as a mini-circus around its tiny obelisks. At the opposite end of its eponymous square is a museum patio displaying several works of art essentially exposed to the elements, your first taste of art in an art-overwhelmed Florence.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Florence

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

86 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Santa Maria Novella
5.0 out of 5 stars
2 Opinions
0 miles away
4.5 out of 5 stars
436 Opinions
0 miles away
Show Prices
3.5 out of 5 stars
129 Opinions
0 miles away
Show Prices

View all Florence hotels