Santa Maria Novella, Florence

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  • Santa Maria Novella
    Santa Maria Novella
    by croisbeauty
  • Santa Maria Novella
    Santa Maria Novella
    by croisbeauty
  • Santa Maria Novella
    Santa Maria Novella
    by croisbeauty
  • Church of Santa Maria Novella

    by kedi+ Written Apr 14, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Santa Maria Novella

    This was the first building I visited when I entered Firenze.. We parked the car in the underground carpark just across the station and started our daily feet tour and it was there... 8))
    About its history, the church was begun in 1278 and was finished in 1360. It's in Lombard style with several stories decorated with small arches and harmonious windows..
    Façade is built with green and white marble and harmonizes well with the architectural complex of the church.
    Interior is in the form of "T" with a nave, two aisles and cross vaulted ceiling..
    Go to find it to have more.. ;))

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    S. Maria Novella Nave

    by bpwillet Written Feb 22, 2004

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    Central Nave-Santa Maria Novella

    The nave is designed to have the piers spaced closer together as they reach the altar at the other end. This is intended to create an illusion of a really long church, assisted by the gray and white banding of the arches. The interior also houses some exceptional works from the 14th and 16th centuries. Of note are "Trinity" by Masaccio (1428), the frescoes of the Cappella Strozzi and Cappella Tornabuoni.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Firsts Come First

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Santa Maria Novella

    One of the first things you'll note when leaving the train station is the famed 13th century Santa Maria Novella church, known for its unique Florentine facade, its charming front fountains, and the square that it overlooks, once used as a mini-circus around its tiny obelisks. At the opposite end of its eponymous square is a museum patio displaying several works of art essentially exposed to the elements, your first taste of art in an art-overwhelmed Florence.

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    Best Chapels or Shrines in Italy

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    chapel, Santa Maria Novella

    The chapels within Santa Maria Novella are the best you'll discover in Italy. Most remain in dimly-lit conditions to allow the artwork of centuries to remain sheltered in shadow, but many are coin-operated to give adequate lighting for a few timeless photos. Be ready. These chapels are so beautiful that coins come readily from other visitors, so while they pay your way, you're ready with the camera.

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    Near Santa Maria Novella station

    by lina112 Updated Nov 27, 2008

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    The Church of Santa Maria Novella was built in the 13th century according to the wishes of the Dominican monks. The façade of this church is built in the Gothic-Romanesque style, with white and green marble. Among the most important works of art inside are the frescoes by Masaccio portraying the Holy Trinity, the Crucifix by Brunelleschi and the one by Giotto.

    Ticket: 2.50 euros

    La iglesia de Santa Maria Novella fue construida en el siglo XIII de acuerdo con los deseos de los monjes dominicanos. La fachada de estilo gótico romano está hecha de marmol blanco y verde. Entre las obras de arte mas importantes que se encuentran en su interior destacan los frescos la santa trinidad de Masaccio, la crucifixión de Brunelleschi y la de Giotto.

    Entrada: 2.50 euros

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    Santa Maria Novella Cloister

    by bpwillet Updated Feb 22, 2004

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    Cloisters of Santa Maria Novella

    These are among the nicest examples of Italian Gothic architecture. Begun in 1340 and completed internally in 1360, the cloisters were designed by the same Dominican friars who constructed the church. Among the artists involved in the decorations during the first half of the 15th century the most famous name is that of Paolo Uccello, one of Florence's Renaissance masters. You can also walk through most of the chapels and see the many frescoed walls, some severly flood damaged.

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  • JoostvandenVondel's Profile Photo

    A Dominican Delight.

    by JoostvandenVondel Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Santa Maria Novella, Facade
    1 more image

    Even if you are not planning an extensive stay in Florence, please DO stop in this beautiful basilica located just across from the railway station also called Santa Maria Novella.

    I remember crossing the piazza in the blistering sun only to be relieved to enter the church via its cloister gate just to the left of the main church building. Once through the cloister garden, you step into a magnificent building, home church of the Dominican Order (Order of Preachers) in Florence.

    Construction on the basilica began about 1246 and was finished about 1360. However, Santa Maria Novella's striking black and white marble facade, commissioned by Giovanni di Paolo Rucellai, a local textile merchant, was added later (1456-1470) designed by Leone Battista Alberti. Identified as a polymath, this truly 'Renaissance Man' attempted to incorporate the ideals of humanist architecture into the existing medieval part of the facade, with what I believe, is great success.

    Alberti constructed a broad frieze (wide central section part of an entablature which rests upon columns) decorated with squares; he also is responsible for the detail above the frieze, including the four white-green pilasters and a round window, crowned by a pediment (the triangular section found above the horizontal structure - on this basilica, above the four top columns and their entablature) with the Dominican solar emblem, and flanked on both sides by enormous S-curved volutes (the spiral scroll-like ornaments). The four columns with Corinthian capitals on the lower part of the facade were also added. The pediment and the frieze are inspired by the antiquity, but the S-curved scrolls in the upper part were considered new and without precedent in antiquity. The scrolls (or variations of them), which are found in churches all over Italy and also wider afield, all find their origin here in the design of this church.

    The interior is a celebration of chapels containing precious works of art including The Holy Trinity by Masaccio and the exquisit frescoes in the Spanish Chapel. Once again, I would highly recommend a visit to this church. For art and architectural lovers, it is a true delight, and for the young backpacker, even their tired souls will be uplifted after a visit here! More information about the works of art to be seen in the complex, can be found in the lovely website below. Enjoy!

    Church of Santa Maria Novella

    WEEKLY: 9am - 5pm Friday: 1pm - 5pm
    HOLIDAY: 1pm - 5pm
    ENTRANCE: € 2,50.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Novella

    by Willettsworld Written Jul 12, 2005

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    The church of Santa Maria Novella was built by the Dominicans between 1279 and 1357. The lower Romanesque part of the facade was incorporated into one based on Classical proportions by the pioneering Renaissance architect Leon Battista Alberti in 1456-70. The Gothic interior contains superb frescoes including Masaccio's "Trinity".

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  • alloquisha's Profile Photo

    The most beautiful church exterior...

    by alloquisha Updated Jul 30, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Art exhibit ad

    When you emerge from the train station, one of the first things you will see is the Church of Santa Maria Novella...and it doesn't look all that amazing. However, if you go around to see the facade that faces the Piazza of the same name, you will probably be blown away! It is truly drop dead gorgeous, I stood there for a good twenty minutes just taking in all its marble detail. The colors are just amazing; in my opinion, the exterior rivals the Duomo (and probably is more attractive...a bit more human in scale.) In this photo, you can see some of its arches decorated in zebra-like stripes. It's really a fun piece of work! I was unable to capture a good image of its whole unfortunately, so I went for a shot that included a temporary art exhibit advertisement.

    HOWEVER...the interior is, well I'll be frank: one of the ugliest I have ever seen! It was a big disappointment after being awed by the exterior. I found it to be totally uncohesive and lacking a real sense of place. Definitely not worth the time or money...sit outside and gape at the exterior instead and you will be more than fulfilled.

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Beauty on the outer reaches of the centre

    by mikey_e Written Aug 21, 2007

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    Basilica di Santa Maria Novella
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    The Basilica di Santa Maria Novella was completed (almost) in 1360, although some of the work continued on into the 15th century. The façade is a transition, as you look up toward the sky, from Romanesque to Gothic and has the distinctive white and green patterning of Tuscan Romanesque. Many of the frescoes and artwork have been revitalized by the recent restoration works. A chapel by the altar contains a painted crucifix by Brunelleschi (the artisan responsible for the completion of the Duomo) and the famous green cloisters, together with a museum, are located just outside the entrance to the Basilica.

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  • meaganelizabeth's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Novella

    by meaganelizabeth Written Aug 10, 2005

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    One of the most beautiful churches, containing many important peices of artwork. The facade is beautiful, but the gardens and the interior are really special. They allowed me to sit and paint here for several hours each day. Less crowded and loud than other churches. Take pictures here, because they all look so romantic!
    In this square outside, there are many gypsies. I never understood why, so just be careful.

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  • xiquinho's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Novella Church

    by xiquinho Written Jan 2, 2008

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    One of the first great Florentine churches, Santa Maria Novella was built between the 13th and 14th centuries, and ranks among the city's most attractive buildings. The ornate black and white marble facade, completed in the 1400s and resembling intricate mosaicwork, is the church's most immediately appealing feature, but the interior, like many of the city's institutions, serves as a repository for numerous works of art. Arguably most significant among these - at least for those interested in the history of art - is Masaccio's Trinity, one of the first paintings to employ the use of perspective, and therefore one of the great cornerstones of the Renaissance.

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    Santa Maria Novella

    by challenger Written Sep 8, 2002

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    One of the many beautiful churches in Florence. When visiting this as well as most of the other churches in the city, you are not allowed to wear shoulderless strap tops, shorts or mini skirts. If in doubt (especially if you are a woman) always carry an extra T-Shirt or scarf with you to cover flimsy tops :-)

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  • MatthewMetcalfe's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Novella

    by MatthewMetcalfe Written Oct 5, 2004

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    Santa Maria Novella

    Santa Maria Novella was the first European Church I had ever seen. It was awesome even though it paled in comparison to The Dome or St. Peter's in Rome. Inside, the craftsmanship is unlike anything I've seen in American Churches. Artwork from the masters is found in almost every nook.

    Built over generations, the patrons of the church who gave extraordinary support in building it are entombed in the wall surrounding the courtyard. Each tomb has the Family Crest on it.

    There are often lines to get in so leave plenty of time to see it. The Street Vendors sometime sell books on the church as well. They are relatively inexpensive ($10.00 or so) and give a great history of the building.

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  • vanessadb's Profile Photo

    Santa Maria Novella, The...

    by vanessadb Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Santa Maria Novella, The Church and the Cloisters
    The Church of Santa Maria Novella is one of the many beautiful churches of Florence. Frescoes from Giotto, Brunelleschi, Ghiberti, Ghirlandaio and many others are featured inside. Masaccio's Trinity is there as well.

    Make sure you don't miss the Cloisters (separate entrance and ticket) and the simple yet enchanting Chapel of the Spaniards.

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