The Uffizi Gallery, Florence

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  • PALLINA's Profile Photo

    survival reccomandations

    by PALLINA Updated Apr 21, 2009

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    Ponte Vecchio_Corridoio Vasariano from Uffizi
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    If you are willing to visit the Offizi (you should) please note that:
    1. with a web reservation you'll pay 4 euros more, but you save a lot of time without waiting and you have a special entrance door
    2. the audiophone costs 4 euros more and are not so detailled. Better to buy a good book in my opionion
    3. Italians before 18 and over 65 years are FREE. EU citizens from 18 to 25 have a special rate.
    4. There is a (free) wardrobe for big backbag or umbrellas but not for coats or normal bags. Go there as light as you can.
    6. Good to go there if you are interested in studying the Japaneese people but you cannot afford Tokyo. I've never seen such a concentration in my life.

    I am not giving any other tips, the Uffizi is one of the beautiful museum of the world.

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  • abi_maha's Profile Photo

    The Uffizi Gallery

    by abi_maha Written Mar 7, 2009

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    The UFFIZI GALLERY is one of the greatest museums in Italy and the world. The Uffizi was intended to house the offices of the famous Medici family (Uffizi = offices). From the beginning, however, the Medici set aside certain rooms to house the finest works from their collections.

    Today the Uffizi contains masterpieces by Italian and foreign artists from the 13th to the 18th century, such as Cimabue, Giotto, Masaccio, Beato Angelico, Leonardo da Vinci, Botticelli, Michelangelo, Piero della Francesca, Raphael, Caravaggio, along with Rubens, Rembrandt, Dürer, Goya and many others

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    Awe inspiring

    by BlueBeth Written Jan 30, 2009

    The Uffizi could possibly be the most important art gallery in the world. That's quite a claim and I guess a little naive seeing as how I haven't seen The Louvre or the Guggenheim but nowhere else have I ever been so completely overwhelmed by art.
    Standing in front of a Caravaggio that the Uffizi just happened to find in storage in the early part of the 20th century you realise how rich this collection is.
    Stand outs for me where Botticelli's The Birth of Venus and Titian's Urban Venus. Andrew loved Leonardo's The Adoration of the Magi but every room (and there are over 40 all joined by corridors lined with antiquities fro mthe Roman period onwards) has something to make you gasp.

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  • cinthya_in_victoria's Profile Photo

    The Uffizi

    by cinthya_in_victoria Updated Jan 6, 2009

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    Uffizi is one of the most popular tourist attractions of Florence. Our tour guide told us that in high season, people wait in the queue for 4 or even 5 hours! But you can reserve your tickets in advance so, that'll make your wait shorter.

    We were so unlucky to visit Florence on Monday so, THE MUSEUM WAS CLOSED!!...
    I completely blame the tour company who made the itinerary!!! I really wanted to see the world famous 'Birth of Venus' painting.... :'( But i liked the Palazzo degli Uffizi.

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  • lina112's Profile Photo

    Uffizi

    by lina112 Written Nov 17, 2008

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    The Uffizi Gallery is one of the oldest and most famous art museums in the world, is housed in the Palazzo degli Uffizi. Building of the palace was begun by Giorgio Vasari in 1560 for Cosimo I de' Medici as the offices for the Florentine magistrates. Construction was continued to Vasari's design by Alfonso Parigi and Bernardo Buontalenti and ended in 1581. Its collection of Primitive and Renaissance paintings comprises several universally acclaimed masterpieces of all time, including works by Giotto, Simone Martini, Piero della Francesca, Fra Angelico, Filippo Lippi, Botticelli, Mantegna, Correggio, Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Michelangelo and Caravaggio.

    Opening time: tuesday to Sunday 8.15-18.50
    Ticket: 10 Euros

    La galeria Uffizi es uno de los mas viejos y famosos museos en el mundo, está situado en el palacion del mismo nombre. La construcción del palacio comenzó en 1560 por Giorgio Vasari y se terminó en 1581. La colección de arte de los Uffizi es muy amplia, con fondos incluso no expuestos por falta de espacio. La exposición se distribuye a lo largo de dos pisos del palacio, ordenada cronológicamente, comenzando su recorrido por el segundo piso. Las obras que me cautivaron por completo fueron la primavera y el nacimiento de venus de Botticelli.

    Horarios: martes a domingos de 8.15-18.30
    Entrada: 10 Euros

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    The Uffizi Gallery

    by gigina Written Aug 31, 2008

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    One of the best and most famous art galleries in the world, the Uffizi Gallery (Galleria degli Uffizi) is Florence's greatest jewel. A fitting memorial to the town's importance as the cradle of the Renaissance, this art museum contains one of the greatest collections of paintings in existence.

    The long arcaded buildings which house the gallery were designed by the artist Giorgio Vasari for Grand Duke Cosimo (of the Medici family), and were intended for use as offices (this is where the name Uffizi originated). As well as the paintings which tourists travel the world to see, the Uffizi also houses a good collection of Greek and Roman statues, including the once-revered Venus de' Medici.

    The collection is arranged chronologically, with rooms themed around periods, individual artists or schools. This enables the visitor to trace the course of art from the thirteenth century, through the roots of the Renaissance, past the greatest flowerings of Florentine art and on through Mannerism and up to the eighteenth century. Along the way you will see some of the greatest masterpieces by history's greatest artists, many of them working here in Florence. The most beautiful works here include Botticelli's Birth of Venus and Primavera, Raphael's Madonna of the Goldfinch, and Giotto's Madonnas. But with a list of artists that reads like a Who's Who of art, visitors will be spoiled for choice as they pass works by Cimabue, Fra Angelico, Masaccio, Uccello, Leonardo da Vinci, Filippo Lippi, Ghirlandaio, Luca Signorelli, Michelangelo, Perugino, Titian, Rubens, Caravaggio and so many more.

    The worst things about the Uffizi are the crowds and the authorities' lamentable habit of closing rooms with excuses such as 'staff shortages'. However, you cannot possibly visit Florence for the first time without seeing the Uffizi, and the quality of its art makes up for the inconveniences. Allow yourself plenty of time to view your favourites, to wait until tour parties move on and to absorb the paintings at your leisure.

    A full-price entrance ticket is €6.50, and the museum's booking fee is €3 per person. If a special exhibition is being mounted you may have to pay extra (regardless of whether you want to see the exhibition or not). The Uffizi is part of the Polo Museale Fiorentino, the town's group of state museums, and offers free entry to European Union citizens under 18 and over 65 years of age, and reductions for those aged 18-25. Booking fees still apply.

    The Uffizi is closed on Mondays, and on the 1st January, 1st May and 25th December. The opening times are 8.15am - 6.50pm.

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    Uffizi Plaza

    by mallyak Written Aug 30, 2008

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    The Uffizi Gallery, founded in Florence in 1581, by the De Medici family, is one of the oldest museums in the world. Many important works of Italian and other schools, dating from between the fourteenth and eighteenth centuries, are kept here, including the largest existing collection of Tuscan Renaissance paintings.

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  • Herkbert's Profile Photo

    Interesting inside and out

    by Herkbert Updated Jun 9, 2008

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    Uffizi facade
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    Originally built as an office building, the Uffizi is now one of the primary art galleries in Florence. We were amazed by the sculptures and paintings throughout the gallery. Having seen many of the artworks in magazines or books, it's always a thrill when you get to see a masterpiece in person.

    If you really want to know about the various paintings, I would suggest buying a guidebook before starting your tour. We bought one and it really helped us to appreciate some of the paintings.

    My favorite works were in the Botticelli gallery. Like many others, the Birth of Venus and Primavera were high on my must see list.

    A couple of tips: Call ahead for reservations to avoid having to wait in the long lines. Our hotel took care of making the reservations or us, ask, maybe yours will too.

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    At The Uffizi Gallery

    by eksvist Written Apr 27, 2008

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    The Uffizi Gallery, one of the oldest and most famous art museums in the world, is housed in the Palazzo degli Uffizi, a palazzo in Florence.

    Today the Uffizi is one of the most popular tourist attractions of Florence. In high season (particularly in July), waiting times can be up to five hours. Visitors who reserve a ticket in advance have a substantially shorter wait.

    The narrow courtyard between the Uffizi's two wings creates the effect of a short, idealized street. On this "street" were lot of musicans, artists to amuse the tourists.

    Open Tuesday to Sunday 8,15 – 18,50
    Closed Monday, New Year’s Day, May 1st and Christmas Day.

    Tickets:
    Full Price: € 6,50
    Reduced: € 3,25

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  • seasonedveteran's Profile Photo

    World Masterpieces from the Renaissance

    by seasonedveteran Written Apr 19, 2008
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    It is very hard for a common brute as myself to appreciate these, but the sculptures are ideal forms of the human body, and this anybody can indulge in. Therefore, the Ufizzi is a must. There are many things you must intentionally think to do:

    Look up! The ceiling itself in classical roman times, is painted by skilled Italian painters. Its like looking up into heaven. Therefore, my year in europe gave me an appreciation for art because basically art is about finding beauty in common everyday topics which is reduced to austere and cold elements by other fields of study.

    Look out the window, since it gives you a great view of Ponte Vecchio and the river.

    Highlights include the man in agony with pythons and such. Many many crucifixtion, last supper and similar paintings are painted with faith and beauty in mind.

    TIP: DO NOT arrive her at 12:00, expecting to tick off the museum before dinner. We waited 4 hours at least, leaving only an hour to see the museum before it closes. They can only allow a prescribed number of visitors due to humidity affecting the paintings. Go when it opens please!

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  • wilocrek's Profile Photo

    The best Art Museum in Florence!

    by wilocrek Written Mar 17, 2008

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    The only line thats longer in Florence than the Academy, is the line to get into the Uffizi. with its endless hallways of paintings and sculptures this is a museum that is worth the wait. Even more so than the Academy.

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  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    Palazzo degli Uffizi

    by Gypsystravels Updated Mar 16, 2008

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    One of Europe’s leading art galleries is of course found here in Florence, the "Uffizi" Established in 1591 it became one of the world's first public galleries. The Uffizi has many works of art by some of the most famous Renaissance painters and sculpters. Among the Uffizi's collections you'll find "The Birth of Venus by Botticelli, works by Caravaggio and of course Leonardo da Vinci.

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    Museum Reservations - Don't Pay High Fees

    by Lacristina Updated Mar 9, 2008

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    You'll Want Reservations for the Uffizi

    Museum reservations are a great idea in Florence. You can wait in line if you prefer, but you'll feel great walking right past that long, hot line. Primarily, you'll need them for the Ufizzi (the most important collection of Italian painting anywhere) and the Galleria dell'Accademia (with Michelangelo's David).

    There are all sorts of commercial web sites offering to make reservations for you for a relatively large fee.

    But you can make the reservations yourself for just a couple of euros by calling the official Florence museum reservation service. You can use the same reservation number for the Uffizi, the Accademia or other museums. They speak English.

    From the US: 011 - 39 - 055 - 294 - 883

    (yes this is the right number - Italian phone numbers can be any number of digits!)

    If you are already in Italy, you call:
    055 - 294 - 883

    The cost of this reservation is 3 euros, but you don't pay this fee until you buy your ticket, or at least, the last time I used the service (Feb. 2008), I didn't.

    The benefits, in addition to a lower fee, are: IF there is no line at the museum, you don't have to use the reservation, just buy your ticket. If you want to change the reservation, just call and change it - there is no fee. And if you don't show up, there is no fee.

    If you go the website I have listed, click on Services, then Tickets, and scroll all the way down the page for their info on booking via phone or in person.

    Finally, most hotels in Florence will be happy to make the reservation for you, if you don't want to call and do it yourself. But if you wait until you arrive in Florence and it's high season, you may not get the times you want. Or any times at all!

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    So much to see

    by olgaehr Updated Jan 11, 2008

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    Outside Uffizi
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    Devote at least 3 hours for this museum, you will walk around one building and enter endless halls filled with various world famous paintings. Some of the original decorations in the building is art itself. Uffizi always has traveling galleries on the second floor. When we went there they had Leonardo Da Vinci works of art and science.

    Highlights:
    Leonardo da Vinci, Self-portrait and Leda and the swan
    Playing Angel by Giovanni Rosso Fiorentino
    Madonna del cardellino by Raphael
    Portrait of a Man with the Medal of Cosimo de Medici by Sandro Botticelli
    Bacchus by Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio
    La Primavera by Botticelli
    The Birth of Venus by Botticelli
    The Duke and Duchess of Urbino by Piero della Francesca
    Annuncition
    Ognissanti Madonna
    Venus of Urbino
    The Doges' Palace and Piazza San Marco, Venice by Canaletto

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  • xiquinho's Profile Photo

    The Uffizi

    by xiquinho Written Jan 2, 2008

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    Across the road from the Palazzo Vecchio, the Uffizi ("Offices") were originally just that: government offices built in 1560. Vasari, the architect responsible for the upper gallery on the Ponte Vecchio, designed the buildings.

    The upper storey was used to house Francesco I's art collection, which subsequent generations of the Medici family added to over the centuries. The last surviving member of the family, Anna Maria Lodovica, left it to the people of Florence for perpetuity.

    Although many of the sculptures have been moved to the Bargello, what's left - the Galleria degli Uffizi - is arguably the best collection of art in Italy, chronologically arranged to illustrate the story of Florentine art. Masterpieces on display include Botticelli's Birth of Venus, Michelangelo's Holy Family and Titian's Venus of Urbino.

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