Uffizi Gallery - Galleria Degli Uffizi, Florence

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Piazzale degli Uffizi

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  • Uffizi Gallery - Galleria Degli Uffizi
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    View from the Arno Corridor
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  • JoostvandenVondel's Profile Photo

    The Uffizi : A human sized monument

    by JoostvandenVondel Updated Aug 2, 2009

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    Again, no visit to Florence is complete without a visit to the Uffizi or "Galleria degli Uffizi". Even for those who may not be as keen in art as myself, this art museum, one of the oldest in Europe, contains just the right amount of cultural delights to keep the mildly curious from feeling annoyed that they've spent too much time and money without having seen enough internationally reknowned works; whilst art connaisseurs will be able to linger much longer feeling they've savoured a good amount of the collection.

    The structure was originally built as a palace for Cosimo I de Medici (1560-1581) as the offices for the city's magistrates or "uffizi". The "cortile" (internal courtyard) is long and narrow and leads out to the Arno River. Most architectural historians treat it as the first regularized streetscapes of Europe.

    By the end of the 16th century, the Uffizi became a place where the artistic wealth of the Medici family were put on public display and over the following years, further parts of the palace evolved into viewing galleries for a selective public.

    The last remaining Medici Heiress, Anna Maria Lodevica bestowed to the city of Florence the art treasures of the family and in 1765 it was officially opened to the general public. The collection is vast including some of my favourite artists such as: Cimabue, Giotto, Fra Filippo Lippi, Hugo van der Goes, Sandro Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Titian, Caravaggio, Artemisia Gentileschi, Rembrant van Rijn...

    As stated above, there is something for everyone in the Uffizi and I would find it difficult for anyone not to be able to appreciate a visit to this museum. The crowds may be overwhelming so GO EARLY. The museum opens its doors to the first visitors at 8:15 and it is well worth arriving at that time and making the morning out of your visit. Do call the Uffizi directly to reserve your tickets on 055 2388651 (they speak fluent English); any other site will charge you more than the €4.00 booking fee charged by the Uffizi. When you arrive from the Piazza della Signoria, go to the middle of the "cortile" and to your right you will need to collect your ticket. Once you have it, you cross over to the right side of the "cortile" where you enter the museum. Enjoy!

    Opening times:

    Tuesday-Sunday: 8:15 - 18:50 (sometimes extended in the summer - check)
    Closed Mondays, Christmas, New Year's and May 1st

    €6.50 full priced admission
    €3.25 for reductions
    Exhibitions are generally more
    €4.00 advanced booking charge (well worth it, it guarantees you an entry at an alotted time, otherwise, have fun queueing up for ages)

    Uffizi Gallery, The Cortile
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    Greatest Galleria in Italy - The Uffizi

    by jlee008 Updated May 6, 2005

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    Uffizi meaning "offices" in Florentine dialect was once the Medici offices. The Uffizi building was originally commissioned in 1560 by Cosimo I de' Medici to be his office. Cosimo I also commissioned it to be a painting gallery.

    On May 27, 1993 a car bomb devastated the west wing of the gallery. However, it has since risen like a phoenix from the ashes. It remains today, one of the greatest museums of Italy and of the world. It houses an enormous collection of renaissance paintings in its seemingly small space. Unfortunately, I cannot say that there is one great work of art to see because there is a multitude of great art to see. Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael Sanzio, Sandro Botticelli...and the list goes on and on and on.

    Do check out Botticelli's Birth of Venus and his Primavera. Definately linger at Leonardo da Vinci's Annunciation. He painted this in 1472 or 1475 while training with his master, Andrea del Verrocchio. One can see his remarkable talent even at that young age.

    As with the Galleria d'ell Accademia, I highly recommend getting reservations ahead of time. Don't be surprised if the museum closes suddenly for crowding reasons. Because the paintings are sensitive to heat and humidity, the gallery may close after admitting a certain number of people. There is a small fee associated with reserving the tickets, but it is well worth it!!!

    RESERVATIONS: 055-294-883 (Mon-Fri 8:30am-6:30pm, Sat until 12:30pm) or at www.firenzemusei.it

    HOURS: Tues-Sun 8:15am-7pm
    (last entry 45min to closing)

    **Before you go, you can check out their virtual gallery before going. It is really neat!!! http://www.virtualuffizi.com/ **

    View of Uffizi from across Arno
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    The First Museum in the World

    by csordila Updated May 9, 2009

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    The octagonal Tribuna is the pearl of the Uffizi symbolizing the four elements. The cupola with shells is the sea, the scarlet silk on the walls is the fire, while the lantern and the wind rose represent the air. The marble floor and the precious table standing in the center, are the earth of course. By the 1770s it was the most famous room in the world.
    In the center of the Tribuna you can see the Medici Venus by a classical Greek sculptor. The painting on the walls are portraits of the members of the Medici family.
    The grand-ducal collection of the Uffizi comprises thousands of paintings of all times. It is impossible to see all of them in one day. If you try to get the museum visit over in one day, the result is always a dead-tired tourist, who conceives a dislike for the museums forever.
    You should be selective, and concentrate only to the art works you are most interested in. I would like to call your attention to one thing only: expect to spend some time in front of the magnificent Doni Tondo in its original frame, the only known preserved panel painting by Michelangelo. Some famous highlights, such as Birth of Venus and Primavera from Botticelli, Tiziano's Venus of Urbino, Leonardo's Annunciation, or Pope Leo X by Rafaello you should not pass by.
    At the end of the visit, go up to the terrace bar at the top, and drinking a cool Campari you can admire the fantastic view of Piazza della Signoria.

    The terrace bar Uffizi Tribuna - today Ponte Vecchio from Uffizi Uffizi Tribuna 1770  in Royal Collection London
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    Uffizi Reservation Number

    by mariocibelli Written Sep 13, 2004

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    Avoid the two-hour peak-season midday wait by making a telephone reservation. It's easy, slick, and costs only €3 (in addition to the €8.50 admission fee). Dial 055-294-883 during office hours (Mon–Fri 8:30–18:30, Sat 8:30–12:30) at least a day before your visit and ideally at least a few days in advance for a better selection. With the help of an English-speaking operator, you'll quickly get an entry slot (15-min window) and a six-digit confirmation number. Off-season, it can be possible to get a same-day reservation. Using the same phone number, you can reserve in advance for the Accademia, Bargello, Medici Chapels, and Pitti Palace; of these, the Accademia has the worst lines.

    After you've booked your reservation, go to the Uffizi at your appointed time. give your number, pay (cash only), and scoot right in.

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    Illustrious Men of the Uffizi Loggia

    by dvideira Updated May 28, 2004

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    There are 28 sculptures in niches along Vasari's court.

    All the grand Tuscan artists, writers, poets, philosophers, men of arms and statesmen representative of Florentine History:

    Cosimo the Elder
    Lorenzo the Magnificent
    Andrea Orcagna
    Nicola Pisano
    Giotto
    Donatello
    Alberti
    Leonardo da Vinci
    Michelangelo
    Dante Alghieri
    Petrarch
    Boccaccio
    Machiavelli
    Guicciardini
    Vespucci
    Galileo
    Antonio Micheli
    Francesco Redi
    Paolo Mascagni
    Aandra Cisalpino
    Sant'Antonino
    Accorso
    Guido Aretino
    Cellini
    Farinata degli Uberti
    Pier Capponi
    Giovanni dalle Bande Nere
    Francesco Ferrucci.

    loggiato degli uffizi - uomini illustri - firenze
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    Uffizi vs Pitti

    by Tijavi Updated Jul 5, 2009

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    No controversies here, just pitting the Uffizi gallery against the Palazzo Pitti museums. In reality the two museums, although sitting on opposite sides of the Arno river, are connected together by an ingeniously-devised elevated medieval corridor called Corridoio Vasariano. But this is where their commonality ends.

    While getting into the Uffizi requires a very stressful ritual of waking up on ungodly hours to beat the long queue, snatching tickets to the Pitti museums is effortless. And the collection? The Uffizi may be regarded as Italy's greatest gallery, but poor presentation and the absence of many artworks loaned to other galleries all over the world make one think if the hype is worth it. Of course, as the Uffizi is obligatory for all tourists, art lover or not, the gallery is a virtual claustrophobic's nightmare.

    In contrast, Pitti's collections are well-presented and labeled and the expansive corridors and galleries provide ample space to enjoy the collections, which are not lacking in Raphaels, Titians and Caravaggios, among others.

    If I had to choose between the Uffizi and Pitti, it's a no brainer and Pitti comes out a winner.

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    Galleria degli Uffizi

    by fishandchips Updated Feb 14, 2007

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    The Uffizi is one of the better galleries around the world with a couple of key paintings, including Botticelli's Birth of Venus, in a wonderful two storied building.

    The Uffizi Palace, as it was then, was constructed in the mid- sixteenth century by the architect Giorgio Vasari in the period when Cosimo de' Medici, first Grand Duke of Tuscany was in power. The building is a long U shaped affair with 45 rooms on the third floor that contain a large number of paintings, sculptures plus some tapestries and pieces of furniture. Work by artists Giotto, Simone Martini, Piero della Francesca, Fra Angelico, Filippo Lippi, Botticelli, Mantegna, Correggio, Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Michelangelo and Caravaggio can be seen here. On the second floor there are a few rooms including a library.

    My tour group had an optional excursion for 30 euros so I paid the 8.50 euro entry fee & walked it myself getting the 4.50 euro audio guide. You can book tickets online as queues can get extremely long in the middle of summer - a limited number of people are let in every 15 minutes so your wait may be quite long.

    Visit the below website for a virtual look at the gallery. There is also a link to purchase tickets though you have to specify date and time which may not be easy fitting into your schedule.

    Uffizi Gallery
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    The Uffizi Gallery

    by Callavetta Written Mar 23, 2005

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    Uffizi is Italian for "offices". The rooms that house the amazing Uffizi Gallery, one of the world's leading museums, were once the offices housed by those who ran the City of Firenze. Today, the corridors of the Uffizi along with the Vasari Corridor connect the Palazo Vecchio and Pittl Palace, on the other side of the Arno.

    While the Art that is housed in the museum is truly world class, the building itself is worth a visit. Murals cover the ceilings of every section of the hallways corridors. There is so much to see I imagine a person could return daily for years and not notice everything.

    Take a Virtual Tour of the Uffizi Gallery

    To avoid the long lines that are typical during the high season, purchase your tickets online.

    Tickets: euro 8,00
    euro 4,00 European Citizens

    Rubens men are as full figured as his women!

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  • dvideira's Profile Photo

    The Uffizi

    by dvideira Updated May 28, 2004

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    The pic shows the Piazzale degli Uffizi and Loggiato degli Uffizi - beginning at the Palazzo Vecchio and stretching to the river Arno.

    Here you find the entrance to the Museo degli Uffizi or Uffizi Gallery, wich houses numerous famous art works such as the Birth of Venus and the Primavera by Botticelli, The Annunciation by Leonardo da Vinci as well as works by Michelangelo, Titian and Rubens.

    Because of its popularity and because only small groups are let into the museum at one time, people have to wait in line for several hours to visit the Uffizi Gallery.
    There is a number that you can call in advance and reserve a specific time to visit the museum. For only about US $1 extra, you can call 39-055-294-883 (Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.) and buy your tickets.

    VASARI CORRIDOR:
    The Vasari Corridor goes from the West Corridor of the Gallery, heads towards the Arno and then, raised up by huge arches, follows the river as far as the Ponte Vecchio, which it crosses by passing on top of the shops. On the other side of the Arno, the corridor passes through the interior of the church of Santa Felicita, over the tops of the houses and the gardens of the Guicciardini family until it finally reaches the Boboli gardens and the apartments in the Pitti Palace.

    piazzale degli uffizi - florence
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    Help. I have syndrome di Stendhal.

    by craic Written Nov 23, 2007

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    Oh - Primavera! Oh - Birth of Venus! (Don't the girlies look just like Cate Blanchett?) Oh there's a Goya! And a Michelangelo. Help help help. I'm drowning. Isn't Canaletto lovely? Although somewhat smaller than I expected.
    This is the big one. Come emotionally prepared. The game I play of picking one piece to take home with me (if only) I took a beautiful little Caravaggio of a tipsy Bacchus.
    And the building is as beautiful as anything in it. Strolling along the galleries - the view of the Arno, the decorated roof - put a paper bag on my head I am hyper ventilating.
    Costs 10 euros.
    This is Italy giving you a great big smack in the chops.

    Uscita courtesy of United Colours of Benetton.

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    the uffizi gallery

    by doug48 Written Jul 29, 2006

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    the uffizi (office), is located next to the palazzo vecchio. built in 1580 it originally was the offices of cosimo I. the uffizi is the oldest and one of the finest art galleries in the world. the uffizi's collection contains ancient greek and roman sculpture and some of the best italian renaissance paintings in the world. some examples are, titian's "venus of urbino", francesca's "duke and duchess of urbino", botticelli's "birth of venus" and "the primavera", da vinci's "the annunciation" and raphael's "madonna of the goldfinch". one of the finest art galleries in the world, a must see site in florence.

    the uffizi
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    Galleria degli Uffizi

    by goodfish Updated Oct 28, 2014

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    This is one of world’s great art museums and a must-do for visitors to Florence. It is also one of the busiest attractions so pre-ordered tickets (see the website) or passes are HIGHLY recommended during the summer and shoulder seasons. Housed largely on the top floor of a 16th-century administrative palace built by Cosimo I, the collection includes part of the Medici family’s acquisitions and commissions.

    The works are distributed throughout the separate rooms by artist, period and/or origin. Purchase a guide from the bookshop when you arrive to give you an idea of what-is-where and some background on the most important pieces: “Uffizi Gallery: The Official Guide of All the Works” is a good one with quality reproductions, and makes a nice souvenir of your visit. Audio guides are also available for an additional fee.

    Raphael, Da Vinci, Botticelli, Lippi, Titian, Caravaggio… they’re all here and them some!

    A few good things to know:

    • Backpacks, bags and umbrellas must be checked (no charge)

    • The galleries are handicapped-accessible with some assistance: see the website

    • Cellphone use is not allowed

    • The gallery has a cafe (with a nice terrace view) and restrooms

    • Ticket prices vary depending on special exhibits

    • Non-flash photography is now allowed (as of July 2014)

    • Closed Mondays, Christmas Day, January 1st, and May 1st

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    Uffizi

    by Jmill42 Written Mar 25, 2004

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    First, I am a much bigger fan of Impressionistic art than anything else, and normally am not the biggest fan of Renaissance art. But, the Uffizi blows you away with its wondrous works of Renaissance. One after the other. Famous works, by famous artists, and just as fabulous works by lesser known people. The entire place is boiling over with masterpieces.

    It is worth the wait in line that you will have to endure in the high season. I was there in early October, and I waited about an hour and a half.

    Tickets cost 8.50 Euro for adults. 4 for students of the EU (or for US students who beg...)

    Outside the Uffizi

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  • Donna_in_India's Profile Photo

    All the Greats are Here....

    by Donna_in_India Updated Jul 5, 2009

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    The Uffizi has the greatest collection of Renaissance art in the world. There is so much to see that it can be a little overwhelming. The Uffizi is a U-shaped building and before being a world famous museum was used as administrative offices. The Uffizi houses famous works by such masters as Michelangelo, Leonardo, Raphael, and Botticelli.

    Some important rooms (5 rooms of paintings) and temporary exhibits are located on the first floor but the main collection is on the second floor. The paintings move chronologically from the Italian collection to works by German, Flemish, and finally Dutch masters. Works are divided into separate rooms by artist.

    It would be difficult to pick my favorites but I really liked the Botticelli's and the Cupids!

    Since this museum is exceptionally popular, I recommend buying your tickets online to avoid the lines. It is a must see in Florence! Allow plenty of time to see all the rooms.

    Hours:

    Tuesday-Sunday 8:15 a.m. - 6:50 p.m., closed Mondays

    Admission:

    € 6,50
    € 3,50 for European citizens over 18 and under 25

    Please note that all visitor information is correct as of this writing.

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    Italy's Greatest Art Museum

    by Tom_Fields Written Dec 29, 2009

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    If you're looking for Michelangelo's David or Botticelli's Venus, then this is the place. The powerful Medici family commissioned Giorgio Vasari to design the building as an administrative office, in the late 16th century. As the works of art accumulated, it became Italy's best-endowed gallery. In 1737, Anna Maria Ludovica de Medici, last of her line, bequeathed it to the city as a public museum.

    The Uffizi Gallery's courtyard
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