Walking, Florence

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  • Piazza Santa Maria Novella - Chillin' in Autumn
    Piazza Santa Maria Novella - Chillin' in...
    by BeatChick
  • Piazza Santa Maria Novella - September Day
    Piazza Santa Maria Novella - September...
    by BeatChick
  • Piazza Santa Maria Novella - September Day
    Piazza Santa Maria Novella - September...
    by BeatChick
  • BeatChick's Profile Photo

    Piazza Santa Maria Novella

    by BeatChick Written Jan 18, 2015

    If you're just off a long train ride and crave some respite and people watching, head on over to the nearby Piazza Santa Maria Novella where you'll spy quite a few people. Also, out of doors is a really cool statue of Dante, one of my favorite writers and poets.

    Piazza Santa Maria Novella - Chillin' in Autumn Piazza Santa Maria Novella - September Day Piazza Santa Maria Novella - September Day
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  • marikatravel's Profile Photo

    Must do in Florence

    by marikatravel Written Mar 9, 2012

    Hello,

    I think that the monuments and sightseeing suggested into the itinerary you found are some of the mustsees of Florence. I would like to add two other point of interests, such as Pitti Palace together with the Boboli Gardens and Santo Spirito Church, my favorite church in Florence, preserving great masterpieces.

    I also would like to suggest you a couple of places where to eat or taste some good food or wine. The first one is Cantinetta da Verrazzano, a nice bakery where you can taste good schiacciata together with excellent Chianti wine produced by their farm in Chianti. It is located in via dei Tavolini (between Palazzo Vecchio and the Duomo). Then go taking a coffee or a tea at the coffee bar of the Oblate Library, in via dell'Oriuolo, where you can have the best Duomo's view.

    Regarding shopping it depends what are you looking for. The city center is full of shops, libraries, bars and restaurants, as well as good pasticcerias and ice cream shop. Ah don't forget to take the ice-cream at Carapina, via Lambertesca. I think its ice-cream is the best in town, since it's made of fresh seasonal ingredients.

    Hope you'll enjoy Florence!

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    • Photography

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  • wilocrek's Profile Photo

    Walking the streets.

    by wilocrek Updated Jan 12, 2008

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    Like most Italian cities, Florence is a pleasure to walk through. Whats particularly unique about the streets of Florence is that they are long, straight and narrow. The buildings brush right up against the sidewalks on both sides and so even though none of the buildings look higher then 3 to 4 stories, they seem a lot bigger while walking the streets because of how cramped everything is. Even on a bright sunny day in Florence, if your so lucky, the streets seem to always be in the shadows and the Duomo always seems to loom large at the end of every street!

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  • cagliaro's Profile Photo

    touristy things

    by cagliaro Written Apr 4, 2007

    when you are in florence do all the touristy things. the duomo and museum, the uffizi, santa maria novello, the accademia, the brancacci chapel. walk down via tornabuoni. we stayed on the via ricasoli and walked everywhere. it was great.

    Related to:
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    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Walking and window shopping in Florence

    by SLLiew Written Oct 2, 2006

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    I enjoyed walking the streets of Florence - passing world famous branded Italian high fashion shops. Great way to for window shopping. What surprised me was the entreprenuer of many road side sellers of African descent in front of these shops. What a contrast.

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  • skywalkerbeth's Profile Photo

    Walk your buns off - and get a good picture

    by skywalkerbeth Written Jul 25, 2006

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    If you want a good view, you gotta climb! I walked up up up to the Piazzale Michelangelo and snapped away. May is just the best time to go - sunny, not too hot, and maybe a little crowded but not bad. You can also visit San Miniato al Monte, which is a beautiful 11th century church. I could see it from my hotel which was great at sunset!

    San Miniato al Monte

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  • The city itself

    by Mitjo Written May 23, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It might be obvious thing to say, but the first thing anyone who arrives to Florence should do is just to walk around and look for the architecture. It doesn't matter where you go in the city, you can still see unique buildings, large piazzas and narrow alleys which all make a large part of your experience. Sometimes it is worth to go far as possible from Piazza de la Signoria, sit down in some quite street and just look people passing you buy.

    Oo'h, what a cliché, but it works for me.

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  • chery08's Profile Photo

    Walk Walk Walk....

    by chery08 Written Jul 23, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You gotta walk alot to uncover the whole city... and it's really nice feeling walking in the streets of Florence...You will bump into some little surprises...man sellings things on the streets... people performing on the streets.. some drawing on the floor..that's so interesting~~... i LOVE it~~~~

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  • Kiwigirlie's Profile Photo

    It's not such a hard walk

    by Kiwigirlie Written Feb 2, 2005

    If you walk to the hills on the west side of the river there is a park and look out point. Very nice to get up there first thing in the morning or towards the end of the afternoon. It's a lovely place to have a picnic, some cheese & wine and enjoy the views.

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  • kenyneo's Profile Photo

    Another side of Florence

    by kenyneo Updated Oct 23, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Climb Keny climb ...
    So shout Rene from behind ...
    We will be up in no time ...
    Up the Biboli garden of mine...
    You shall throw away the Firenze in mind
    Coz what you see will be a different kind !

    If you think Florence is a sea of red and burnt orange red roof ..then you should think again. The hike up the Giardino di Biboli ( Biboli Garden) and ( Palazzo Petti ) Petti Palace is definitely worth it !!

    To love oneself is the beginning of a lifelong romance.

    - Oscar Wilde

    Florence is not only  orangey ,red roof
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  • mariocibelli's Profile Photo

    Walk on the WIld Side Part 2

    by mariocibelli Written Sep 21, 2004

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    Part of the charm of Florence is seeing how the city changes during the day. One of the best times for a walkabout, is first thing on Sunday morning like at 7 or 8 AM. THere is practically nobody out and with good sun, you have the place to yourself and can take photos till your viewfinder falls off without having to worry about the tour groups.

    The Lungarno (Day) like you cant tell!

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  • mariocibelli's Profile Photo

    Walk on the WIld Side Part 1

    by mariocibelli Written Sep 21, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Part of the charm of Florence is seeing how the city changes during the day. One of the best times for a walkabout, is first thing on Sunday morning like at 7 or 8 AM. THere is practically nobody out and with good sun, you have the place to yourself and can take photos till your viewfinder falls off without having to worry about the tour groups.

    The Lungarno
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  • Tolik's Profile Photo

    Costa San Giorgio

    by Tolik Written Jul 10, 2004

    From the back of Piazza San Felìcita, the narrow lane Costa San Giorgio winds up the hill towards Forte di Belvedere. At the fork with Costa Ascarpuccia (a beautiful road which leads downhill to Via de Bardi) is the church of San Giorgio Sulla Costa. The Baroque interior is one of the best in Florence. The altarpieces are by Redi, Vignali and Passignano, on the ceiling the Glory of Saint George.

    Further up the Costa San Giorgio at #19 is the villa purchased by Gallileo for his son. Here Ferdinando II visited the great scientist in 1620. Gallileo himself lived from 1610 – 31 farther along the road.

    Alternatively, from the foot of Ponte Vecchio you can pass beneath the Corridoio Vasariano and follow up Via dei’ Bardi. On the left of the street at No.36 is Capponi delle Rovinate with remarkable courtyard. At No 24 is the little church of Santa Lucia dei Magnoli. Via dei’ Bardi ends at Piazza dei Mozzi. At Piazza Mozzi No.1 stands the large Palazzo Bardini (1883) which houses Museo Bardini now. The Mozzi, like the Bardi, were one of the richest Florence families in the 13th century; they lost their wealth in the 14th century.

    Costa San Giorgio
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    Via Guiccardini

    by Tolik Written Jul 10, 2004

    Across the Borgo San Jacopo is a fountain of Bachus and a Roman sarcophagus. Via Guiccardini where we stayed, starts here. The Guicciardini street (ex-Volterana because it leads to the town called Voltera) runs from the Ponte Vecchio towards Piazza Pitti. This narrow picturesque street is one of the busiest in Florence; but the shops provide interesting possibilities for the Florence visitors. At the end of the road at No.15 is Palazzo Guicciardini, residence of Luidgi di Piero Guicciardini, Godfalonier of Justice. Famous historian and writer Francesco Guicciardini was born here in 1483. Francesco wrote here History of Italy in 1530. The courtyard and garden (1620) can be seen through the grille. Casa Campiglio in our courtyard was the house where Machiavelli lived and died in 1527. Dostoewski wrote "The Idiot " while living at No. 21, Piazza Pitti.

    In the beginning of the street, on the left opens Piazza Santa Felicita with a granite column (1381) which marks the site of the 1st Christian cemetery in Florence. The Greek merchants settled here in 2nd century and introduced Christianity to the city. Here is Santa Felìcita (Mon–Sat 9am–noon & 3–6pm, Sun 10–11am & noon–1pm), probably the oldest church in Florence (or second oldest after San Lorenzo). The 1st church was built here in the 4th C, and restructured in the 11th and the 14th centuries. The interior has a single nave with pilasters that frame the side chapels. Between 1736 and 1739 Ferdinando Ruggieri restructured it yet again, though he preserved the portico done by Vasari. Brunelleschi designed the Cappella Capponi for the Barbadori family (inside, 1st on the right). In the 16th century it became the Medici chapel. The church worth a visit for the famous Pontormo’s paintings (The Deposition and The Annunciation).

    Piazza Santa Felicita
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  • wanderlust23's Profile Photo

    Exploring Florence

    by wanderlust23 Updated Feb 5, 2004

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    You must also take a walk around the city around dusk. The city becomes abathe in an orange glow. It's breathtaking and makes for the best photos. (Also check out some other sunset pics in the Piazalle Michelangelo travelogue).

    Florence at sunset

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