Fun things to do in Lucca

  • Tower Guinigi
    by 11mirjam
  • The gardens at Palazzo Pfanner
    The gardens at Palazzo Pfanner
    by Jefie
  • City walls
    by Homanded

Most Viewed Things to Do in Lucca

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    Chiesa(s) in main square of Capannori

    by BruceDunning Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There is a lovely church in the square and other older well preserved structures. The old church was from 786 origin and it was destroyed in 940, to be re-built again in 970. The church is right on the main street of the town and the Sanctuary is also nearby. The old church got another face lift inside in 1640, and transitioned into 1800 for renovations. The campanile is 33 meters high

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Villa Elegance

    by BruceDunning Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Walk down the main street -it is only 4 blocks- to the back entrance to the village. It has some real quite shops that are for daily shopping by locals. The machelleria, dolce neggozia, hardware store, clothing, etc. One of everything a person needs is there. It is a nice feeling to notice local environment in daily living. The main attraction is the chiesa. It was first founded by a monk that build Saint Quirico in 745. That led to continued grow in agriculture. The city of now 41,000 and has a derivitive name form the pharase "little house". It has a lot of substance in growing crops of cereal wheats, vegetables, olive oil and grapes, spread through the flat plains east of Lucca.
    Main attractions are the villa tours of Mansi, Torrigiani and Reale. These are very nice tours and well worth the trip through each. A brief of each. Mansi is a restored but abut to decline open villa(windows and all) The frescoes are super, but fading due to climate/humidity. The baroque facade was added in 17th century. Villa Torrigiani was built in mid1500 and has had hard times, but the gardens are remaining intact. Villa Reale was built before 1500, ands Napoleon's sister who lived in Lucca built a great garden in the back. Only the garden can be visited, because a family occupies as a home. The web sites are shown below forvillas

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Biking in and around Lucca

    by suzqmac Updated Nov 2, 2010

    If you're interested in seeing something of the 'outside' of the wall - I'd suggest contacting Serena and spending a morning riding around the river Serchio and learn something about the ways in which the river has changed and what is being done to look after the river.

    Despite being told when I contacted them that an English speaking guide was not available - Serena speaks very understandable English and we enjoyed a lovely morning together.

    Just a lovely way to enjoy the Tuscan countryside.

    And it is very reasonably priced.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • alza's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    Piazza del Giglio

    by alza Updated Oct 14, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Teatro del Giglio, a landmark of Lucca, is situated on the square of the same name. Very famous place offering a changing programme according to the season: Opera, Theater, Dance and Symphony.
    It's known as the most ancient classic theater of Italy.

    The Square is small and quiet, locked in as it is between the Duomo San Martino and the rather too large Piazza Napoleone.

    The composer Giacomo Puccini is a child of Lucca and is forever honoured here. He was a piano accompanist at the Giglio in his early years as a musician, and returned to it years later as a composer. His operas were mounted there during his lifetime and received triumphantly. The list of his works played at Teatro del Giglio follows:

    Edgar, September 1891
    Manon Lescaut, September 1893
    La Bohème, September 1896
    La Bohème, Summer 1899
    Tosca, September 1900
    Manon Lescaut, Autumn 1906
    La Bohème, January 1906
    Madama Butterfly, September 1907
    Manon Lescaut, Autumn 1910
    La Fanciulla del West (The Girl of the Golden West), September 1911
    Tosca, Autumn 1912
    La Bohème, Carnival 1917
    Tosca, Spring 1919
    Madama Butterfly, Autumn 1920
    La Bohème, Carnival 1923
    Manon Lescaut, September 1923
    Tosca, Carnival 1924

    Now I'm upset with myself for the photo I took at the square... I thought I was getting Puccini but I got Garibaldi (again!) -- a tragedy of Toscan proportion!

    There's a very pleasant Enoteca tucked into a corner of the square, where I had a long Aperitivo in the company of two nice German or Swiss women. When they left, a young family took their place. The baby stayed in his stroller and babbled but the 3-year old boy immediately set out to explore what obviously was the largest playground he'd ever seen. Amazing to watch him walk away from his parents to climb stairs to the buildings, touch the old stones, constantly looking back towards the Enoteca to be sure he wasn't left behind! And to hear his cries of joy! A beautiful moment at the end of the day.

    Was this review helpful?

  • alza's Profile Photo
    3 more images

    Piazza San Michele in Foro

    by alza Written Oct 14, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There's a good statue on Piazza San Michele that linked me to my Canadian history and I decided to focus my tip on it. (The Church of San Michele in Foro is extensively covered already, across the web.)

    The statue is of Francesco Burlamacchi, a politician from Lucca who dreamed of a Confederation of ancient Tuscan Republics with Siena and Lucca, to counter the gradual control of the Pope and Emperor Charles V. His plan of attack was revealed and he was decapitated by order of Charles V. He was later recognised as "First Martyr to Italian Unity". The statue by Ulisse Cambi shows a noble figure of great character.

    The Burlamacchi family had converted to Protestantism. After Francesco's death, they found refuge in France, then in Geneva. One descendant, the French General François Charles de Bourlamaque, served in Canada from 1756, during the Seven Years War. Bourlamaque defended French positions at Oswego, New York, on Lake Ontario (near Syracuse, New York.)

    I walked along a street called Burlamacchi in Lucca, by chance. I had a feeling it was linked to the Bourlamaque name, very well-known in my hometown of Québec City. My primary school in Québec was on Bourlamaque Street... After a quick search, I found that Burlamacchi and Bourlamaque are one and the same family. It's a small world...

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jefie's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    Villa Bottini

    by Jefie Updated Jul 21, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The city of Lucca is famously surrounded by sumptuous country villas, such as the Villa Mansi, Villa Torrigiani and Villa Garzoni. You do need a car, however, to get there. If you'd like to get an idea of what these villas look like, a good option is to visit Villa Bottini, which is located in the historic part of Lucca. The 16th century villa itself is generally not open to visitors, except for different city events. However, it's possible to go for a walk around its lovely gardens and get a little taste of the countryside right at the heart of Lucca.

    Admission is to the gardens is free.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jefie's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    Orto botanico di Lucca

    by Jefie Updated Jul 21, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Lucca's botanical gardens were established in 1820 by Marie Louise of France, the second wife of Napoleon. Marie Louise, then known as the Duchess of Parma, had also founded the University of Lucca and the gardens were meant to become a research facility for botany students. Important scientific research has been conducted at the gardens throughout the years, and although there are still experiments going on, the gardens are open to the public. The arboretum features several exotic species and in the greenhouses it's possible to see a collection of plants with medicinal properties, as well as a collection of edible wild species that are often used in the region's traditional recipes. The Orto botanico is not that big, but it's beautiful and there's enough to keep plant lovers busy for a while.

    L'Orto botanico di Lucca is open from the end of March to the end of October, from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm (7:00 pm in the summertime). Admission is 3 Euros.

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Climb into the hills

    by BruceDunning Updated Aug 8, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Any point north of the city are hills/mountains. They merge into the Apuan and Appenine ranges and within these ranges is a valley. In that valley is the Serchio River that winds through it, and that also allowed people to settle in the low lying valley and into the small hills. This scanned picture depicts the valley where villages thrive surrounded by the hills on either side.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Mansi Villa Grounds

    by BruceDunning Updated Aug 8, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The grounds are a real treat and well maintained. There is about 20 acres under maintenance, and they used to have much more grounds when it was a working estate. Gerardo Mansi was instrumental in preserving the villa after he married a niece of Parenzi family; they were the original owners. The garden was designed for the times of 18th century, and has open spaces, pools of water, statues, stone walls, and an English garden and tropical area.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Mansi Villa Inside

    by BruceDunning Updated Aug 8, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The inside is decorated very nicely, and tours are easy to take with or without a guide. The unfortunate issue is the windows are left open and with humidity, it is only a matter of time where frescoes and paintings deteriorate. Some water damage is prevalent already. The funding to maintain the villa is tight, and still occupied by two family heirs, who do what they can. They are proud of the heritage, but also know it costs a lot to keep up. Why they keep the windows open??

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    Colle di Compito

    by BruceDunning Updated Aug 8, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This delicate and ornate church was hidden in between some buildings when we went by. The structure is from 1700 called chiesa S. Maria Assunta. It is right smack in the middle of the small town square/street and we stopped for a bit at the deli shown next to the other church.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    Segromigno Pieve di S. Lorenzo

    by BruceDunning Updated Aug 8, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The first notice of this church was from 816 and in 12th century they expanded the size. In the 18th century another facade was put on it. It is a lovely church with decorative statues on the top and white marble striped in the facade. It is right on the main winding road going up the hill.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo
    3 more images

    CAponnori-Castelvecchio di Compito

    by BruceDunning Updated Aug 8, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The church called S Giovanni e Andrea is of era in 919 and upgraded in 1260. It serves the Pieve di Compito area, a part of CAponnori, suburb of Lucca. It was restructured in 1796 and again restored in 1901. The clock tower is right next to the church and looks cramped but not, and it is functional.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    CAponnori-SAn Colobano Chiesa di San Colombano

    by BruceDunning Updated Aug 8, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Only from the 1260 era and the capella (head) was the featured attraction. The structure was updated in 1600, but the balustra remains from the original. We stayed right close to this church and it is well attended by locals that some come daily for prayer. Another of same size is just up the road also in Segromino area.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    CAponnori-Lunata Pieve SAn Frediano

    by BruceDunning Updated Aug 8, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This church was from 812 as a second one from the first in 768. Over the years a lot of the church has been transformed from the original, but the tower looks to be very old. The baptismal and christening area were discovered in 1822, which were covered over and enclosed.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

Lucca Hotels

See all 129 Hotels in Lucca

Latest Lucca Hotel Reviews

Il Ciocco Hotel & Resort
193 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 13, 2014
Hotel Noblesse
86 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 14, 2014
Piccolo Hotel Puccini
131 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 6, 2014
La Torre
37 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Aug 27, 2013
Hotel Ilaria
375 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 21, 2014
Lucca in Villa San Donato
33 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 3, 2014
Park Hotel Cavalieri
4 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Nov 25, 2012
Hotel Villa Rinasciemento
27 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Oct 4, 2013
Alla Corte degli Angeli
210 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 7, 2014
Leone di Sant'Anna
15 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Sep 5, 2012
B&B Alla Dolce Vita
18 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Aug 18, 2013
Best Western Grand Hotel Guinigi
82 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 15, 2014
Antica Residenza del Gallo
22 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 13, 2013
Villa La Principessa
98 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Feb 2, 2014

Instant Answers: Lucca

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

77 travelers online now

Comments

Lucca Things to Do

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Lucca locals.
Map of Lucca