The Tower, Pisa

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    The leaning tower

    by shavy Written Oct 24, 2013
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    Everyone knows The Leaning Tower of Pisa, the tower is a freestanding bell tower , or Campanile , which like the Duomo in the Campo dei Miracoli , the wonders of the field
    Designer of the tower was probably Diotisalvi, the original intention was to build a vertical tower but shortly after the start of construction in 1173, the building began to tilt
    That was because of the soggy ground , which is inherent in Pisa, eventually it took two hundred years to build the tower, the Campanile has six floors with colonnades , is on top of the bell chamber the tower has stylistically fact the same structure as the Duomo

    In 1991 the tower was closed to the public , because scientists feared that the tower would go further and further through hells , a series of architectural interventions implemented
    Since 2001 visitors can climbed again to the spiral staircase to the top

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    About the Campanile

    by hquittner Written Jul 5, 2013
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    There were at least six Pisanos who worked on the buildings at the Campo Sancto. Besides the famous Nicola (creator of the Baptistry's Pulpit) and his son Giovanni (creator of the Duomo's Pulpit), there was at the same time working there the unrelated Bonanus (Bonanno Pisano), the first architect of the Leaning Tower. During this period Bonanno also created the bronze doors of the west facade of the Duomo and another set for the South entry. Andrea (again not related), at this time was sculpting the central highest figure on the west front of the Duomo. A generation later Tomasso de Pontedere, a son of Andrea, was in charge of the rebuilding of the belfry of the Campanile, assisted by his brother Nino. We could not climb on the Tower during our visits during the 1990's, while the lean was beings adjusted, and after 2002 we were too old to climb up.

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    Leaning Tower

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jun 10, 2012

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    The Leaning Tower of Pisa or simply Torre di Pisa is the campanile of the Cathedral. It is situated behind the Cathedral and is the third oldest structure in Pisa's Cathedral Square (Piazza del Duomo) after the Cathedral and the Baptistry.
    The height of the tower is 55.86 m (183.27 ft) from the ground on the low side and 56.70 m (186.02 ft) on the high side. The width of the walls at the base is 4.09 m (13.42 ft) and at the top 2.48 m (8.14 ft). Its weight is estimated at 14,500 metric tons (16,000 short tons). The tower has 296 or 294 steps; the seventh floor has two fewer steps on the north-facing staircase.
    Prior to restoration work performed between 1990 and 2001, the tower leaned at an angle of 5.5 degrees, but the tower now leans at about 3.99 degrees. This means that the top of the tower is displaced horizontally 3.9 metres (12 ft 10 in) from where it would be if the structure were perfectly vertical.

    Phone Number: (+39) 050 560547 - Opera della Primaziale
    Fax: 050 560505 - Opera della Primaziale

    Timetable:
    winter 9.00-17.00;
    summer: 8.00-20.00;
    From 14 June to 15 September evening opening: 20.30-23.00
    Price: € 15,00
    Price online booking: € 17,00

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    Well worth a climb....

    by fabric_letters Written May 21, 2012

    Tusacny is full of little hill top towns with towers to climb but if your going to climb any make it this one!!
    Okay you feel like your drunk as you climb the marble stairs but its a must do thing and well worth a day tip to Pisa to tick it off the list.

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  • SOUTHAFRICANDELLA's Profile Photo

    CLIMING THE TOWER

    by SOUTHAFRICANDELLA Written Apr 23, 2012

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    Tickets can be bought for climbing the tower. As these tickets are limited to 30 people every 30 minutes I suggest it is done beforehand. The clime is hard for the unfit, fun for the fit, but rewarding. The feeling of climbing something so off centre cannot be explained.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    The Tower

    by Jim_Eliason Written Nov 13, 2011
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    Its just one of those things you see all your life and you expect it to be dissapointing. Then you see it in person, and you think wow now I know why its so iconic. get here early to get tickets to climb the tower.

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    Campo dei Miracoli - The Leaning Tower

    by croisbeauty Updated Sep 26, 2011

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    The Tower is considered as the most distinctive monument in the Piazza dei Miracoli. It was begun in 1173 by Bonanno who ingeniously adopted the motif of the superimposted galleries used on Cathedral facade. After reaching only its third storey, the building of the Tower had to be abandoned due to a subsidence of the soil which caused its characteristic lean. The work was resumed a century later by Giovanni di Simone, who tried to rectify the Tower's inclination and raised it as far as its sixth srorey.
    Cylindrical in structure, the Tower is surounded by columned arcades. A spiral staircase of 294 steps leads up to the top, where the bell-tower is situated. The bell-tower was built by Tommaso, son of Andrea Pisano, in the mid-14th century.

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    Climb up the Leaning Tower!

    by GracesTrips Updated Jul 6, 2011

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    The ticket price is rather expensive but I think definitely worth it! To climb the tower is €15. It's actually more expensive to buy your tickets online. And, they have timed visits. We arrived fairly early in the morning, so there was no lines.

    The views from the top are phenomenal! And, the staircase is not so narrow that people can pass by if you need a break to rest as you make your ascent.

    Please see more photos on my travelogue!

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    Small details on the Tower

    by leics Written Apr 26, 2011

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    I've never climbed the Tower, not have I ever felt the need to do so.

    To me, it is just a rather lovely piece of architecture with an important history and an almost-unique ability to remain standing when off the vertical (but there are two other such towers in Pisa so it's not entirely unique..have a look at my travelogue).

    But there are some fascinating small details on the exterior.

    Have a look round the back: you'll find a capital with a very strange carving. A monkey stealing oranges? And you'll find another capital with some very odd faces sculpted on it.

    Look over the main entrance. What is the significance of the bear and the dragon and the ram on one side, and the bull and dragon and ?bear? on the other?

    And what of the two ships with the lighthouse(?) between them? Why are they there?

    It is exactly this type of question which makes me wish I could afford a private guide...but there is, of course, no reason why they should know the answers. Often, we do not know what Medieval symbolism actually meant and one can never be 100% certain that any guide is not embroidering the facts.

    See if you can find the Green Man. He's a pagan symbol (a face surrounded by greenery, often with greenery actually growing from his face, standing for fertility and new growth) which is found in churches, cathedrals ad religious buildings all over Europe. Like many ancient pagan symbols he was adopted by Christianity in order to more easily convert the unbelievers (most ancient churches were built on pagan sacred sites). I always look for him wherever I go in Europe, and 9 times out of 10 I'll find him somewhere. I'm glad he's on the Tower too. :-)

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    It has to be seen

    by toonsarah Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Yes, it leans!
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    This is of course the iconic sight of Pisa, and something you just have to see. And yes, it does lean, and yes, as everyone says, it is perhaps not as tall as you might expect of a tower so famous, nor as spectacular, but still – yes, you just have to see it.

    The tower is in fact the bell tower, or campanile, of the cathedral. Itwas built between 1173 and the end of the 14th century. It started to lean as soon as the third floor was completed, in 1177, and the works were stopped. A century later the works started again. In an effort to compensate for the tilt, the engineers built the upper floors with one side taller than the other. This made the tower begin to lean in the other direction, and today, if you look closely at the tower, you can see that it is not only leaning, it is also slightly bent. Over the centuries various attempts had to be made to slow the rate of its tilting, which is caused by the poor drainage of the clay soil beneath. Recent works mean that the Leaning Tower is now "less leaning" than it used to be 5 years ago. Scholars say that it has been brought back to its inclination of 200 years ago. Work is still on-going however, and I was a bit disappointed to find so much scaffolding spoiling my images of it.

    The tower is 54 meters tall and has a spiral staircase with 294 steps leading to the top of the tower. You can go up, though you may have to queue for tickets (or better, book in advance online). I confess I would have liked to do this, but Chris wasn’t so keen and time was short so we gave it a miss. But I imagine the views of the Campo dei Miracoli and Cathedral would be really excellent from the top, though the climb up the slanting spiral staircase is apparently something of a challenge.

    See my Campo dei Miracoli tip for some information about tickets

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  • Peterodl's Profile Photo

    The Tower

    by Peterodl Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The "Leaning Tower of Pisa" is the main attraction to the town of Pisa.
    It's off-center lean is quite a sight to see.
    After 10 years of preservation work in order to pull the tower back to a lean it had in the early 1700's, the tower is no open to tourists to climb the 294 steps to the top.

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  • Jenelle7's Profile Photo

    The Leaning Tower

    by Jenelle7 Updated Apr 4, 2011
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    This is the only thing that I saw in Pisa, as we only stopped on our way to Florence.
    The Leaning Tower of Pisa is an amazing feat of construction, and if you get the chance while in Italy, it is one of those places that you shouldn't miss.

    We climbed the tower, and what a climb it is. It's not for the faint hearted, as the incline on one side is quite steep when climbing the stairs. The view from the top is worth it.
    If you don't want to climb the whole way, you don't have to, as there are places on the way up that you can stop.

    They are currently doing works on the Tower, to decrease the lean, but they still allow you up, but in smaller groups.

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  • Ericasmurf99's Profile Photo

    Leaning Tower of Pisa

    by Ericasmurf99 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Tower of Pisa is the bell tower of the Cathedral. Its construction began in the August of 1173 and continued (with two long interruptions) for about two hundred years. The lean was an accident, and many times the government has tried to fix it. But the lean remains..defying laws of science! Go Tower!

    A very beautiful "must-see" in your lifetime.

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    Leaning Tower of Pisa

    by Blatherwick Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Leaning Tower of Pisa

    Here it is. The most famous architectural mistake ever. The Leaning Tower of Pisa is the bell tower, for the Duomo. The construction of the Tower of Pisa began on August 9, 1173 and continued for two centuries. After the third floor was built in 1178, the tower acquired a lean and construction ceased for a century. In 1272, another four floors were built at an angle to compensate for the tilt. Construction again stopped in 1301 and only in 1372 was the last floor built and the bell installed.

    Galileo Galilei is said to have dropped two cannon balls of different masses from this tower to demonstrate their speed of descent was independent of their mass.

    Benito Mussolini ordered the tower returned to a vertical position so cement was poured into its foundation. The results were unexpected and sank the tower further into the soft soil.

    On February 27, 1964, the government of Italy requested aid in preventing the tower from toppling. A multilateral task force of engineers, mathematicians and historians was assigned and met on the Azores islands to discuss stabilization methods. After many decades of work on the subject, the tower was closed to the public on January 7, 1990. Recently, the tower was reopened to the public on June 16, 2001 after a decade of corrective reconstruction and stabilization efforts.

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    Saving La Torre di Pisa

    by Profsmiley Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Saving the Pisa Tower

    The leaning bell tower of the Cathedral is world-famous. The construction of the tower started in 1173 and completed in 200 years with two long interruptions. The architect is unknown. Apparently the tower started to incline during its construction because of the heavy columns they used.

    In recent years, the leaning of the tower has been stopped by interventions through the sub-soil and replacement of some of the original columns.

    Once we were there, it was impossible not to play the rescuer, hence the picture :-)

    It is now possible to climb the tower, though it's better to reserve before you arrive there if you have such desire. Just keep in mind that the fee is not cheap either - € 15,00 each person.

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