Volterra Off The Beaten Path

  • Staccioli's Red Ring Near Volterra
    Staccioli's Red Ring Near Volterra
    by TooTallFinn24
  • Close Up of the Red Ring
    Close Up of the Red Ring
    by TooTallFinn24
  • Landscape Shot Around the Red Ring Volterra
    Landscape Shot Around the Red Ring...
    by TooTallFinn24

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Volterra

  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    Visit the Balze Out of Town

    by hquittner Written Sep 18, 2013
    A View of the Balze
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    2 km northwest of town is an irregular tract of terrain called the Balze. Within the area there have been landslides and sink holes as the land continues to fall away. It seems to have begun in the 17C and even most of a rural monastery has been engulfed.

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    • Seniors
    • Family Travel

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  • TooTallFinn24's Profile Photo

    Staccioli's Red Ring

    by TooTallFinn24 Written Jun 25, 2013

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    Staccioli's Red Ring Near Volterra
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    Driving the scenic hills from Siena to Volterra you suddenly come upon a huge red ring to the side of the road. Sitting there with nothing else around I had to stop and get a better look.

    It turns out this ring, which appears as weathered red oxide, was designed by Mario Staccioli an Italian sculptor. Staccioli taught art at the collegiate level in Milan for several years. Beginning in the 1970's he decided to focus his creative talents on sculpting.

    Staccioli has been placing pieces of art such as this through the Volterra area for years. This particular piece was placed here in 2005 to celebrate the opening of a local exhibition. Staccioli believes that art such as this out in the urban environment causes us to stop and contemplate the history and how the area has changed over time. Staccioli has many works through the Volterra area. You will see examples of his art in plazas, a small street, and even in a church in Volterra. He has also created major sculptures in places all over the world including Australia, Korea and the United States.

    The ring can be viewed on SR 68 approximately 5 km from the town of Volterra. There is no parking for viewing so be careful where you park and watch for traffic if you decide to go take a closer look of the ring.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Carcere

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 20, 2011

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    The entrance to the prison
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    Castello de Medici had prison already in the medieval times, it is where opponents to the de Medici family and their political power were confined. It was known as a very solid prison and almost impossible to escape from it. Since it served well as a prison in the medieval times it was good reference for being it even in the modern times of Italy. By the way, carcere is Italian expression for the prison.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Le balze

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 18, 2011

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    Landscape around Volterra
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    The whole of Tuscany in one big and beautiful landscape, enchanting territory rich of colours and scences which living in our memory long after we left it. I spend few days in Chianti before getting to Siena, fascinated with the beauty of that hilly and docile area, but I was there before and knew what could expected there. What I saw around Volterra was far above all my expectations. Landscapes around Volterra have those kind of wild beaty which splashing right into the face.

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  • Bunsch's Profile Photo

    Tiny roadside Madonnas

    by Bunsch Written Oct 28, 2010

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    A roadside shrine

    In many places, I noticed that simple shrines had been created, often with a Madonna or some other saint, with a few flowers marking the respect of the creators for the Creator. Stopping at one on the narrow, winding roads close to Volterra was essentially taking our lives into our hands, but I wanted to get a closer look. And I'm sure it was a blessing.

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    • Religious Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    San Gimignano

    by sue_stone Written Oct 26, 2006

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    Views in San Gimignano

    The famous tourist magnet of San Gimignano is located 30 km east of Volterra and is therefore a great destination for a day trip while you are staying in the area.

    San Gimignano is a town of towers - though only 14 of 72 remain these days. It is a fabulous sight when you catch a glimpse of it from a distance on your way there - looks like a mini city atop a cliff.

    This is a very popular place, so best to arrive early if you want to get a parking spot anywhere near the main gate! We headed there first thing, got a great park, and managed to check out quite a bit of the town before the large tourist groups descended.

    Highlights of our visit included climbing to the top of the tallest tower in town, located in the Palazzo Comunale, for amazing views; and sampling what is claimed to be some of the best gelato in Italy, whilst sitting in Piazza della Cisterna by the 13th century cistern in its centre.

    For more information, check out my San Gimignano page.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Volterra - Velathri

    by croisbeauty Written Oct 2, 2005

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    Remains of the Roman temple
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    Around the 8th century BC, Volterra became an important city of the new Etruscan civilization. At the time it was known as Velathri, bing one of the twelve major centres of Etruria, which was religious and political confederation of city-states. In fact, the archaeological evidence suggests that Volterra gradually became the dominant city of the confederation. Volterra was ruled by a Lucumo, who was both a military and a religious leader.
    In the 4th century, however, Volterra became a confederate city in the expanding territory dominated by the Romans. During the period of Roman-Etruscan coexistence, many important monuments were erected in Volterra, including the buildings of the acropolis and the temple near the Roman amphitheatre.

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  • pigletsmom's Profile Photo

    Visit Nearby San Gigminagno

    by pigletsmom Written Mar 4, 2004

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    Lovely Medieval courtyard in San Gimignano

    Volterra is not very far from San Gimignana and it is easy to see both in one day. About 45 minutes by car on lovely winding country roads. These two cities are very different in character, so the contrast is interesting. Unlike Volterra which is silent and lonely, San Gimignana is bustling with energy, and captivating with it's many towers. Lovely shops and restaurants as well.

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    • Historical Travel

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Etruscan Museum

    by iandsmith Updated May 16, 2003

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    We're just good friends

    Volterra is what I would term a fringe town. It's not quite on the beaten path but some tourists are aware of the place and make their way to it.
    Having missed out on two Etruscan displays, including Cortona's reportedly good museum (because I was lost again and arrived 10 minutes before they closed), I was determined to see at least one. I was not disappointed, Museo Guarnacci has much to recommend it, including multi-lingual audio guides, friendly staff and a display that lived up to its promise. With over 600 cinerary urns to choose from they can afford to show you the best and, even some in odd ways.
    It was interesting to note that most were set patterns and so many are just recurring themes along Grecian lines. One of the most notable exceptions is pictured here, this being one of their famed exhibits.
    An extraordinary tale surrounds their lift. "But they haven't got one", I hear you cry. That is true, the problem being that when they started excavating so they could put a lift in for the handicapped an ancient road and ruins were unearthed, a relatively common problem in Italy. Now they don't have a lift but an interesting sidelight that is covered in glass along with artifacts from the tomb of Guerriero, a general from the Bronze Age, also unearthed.

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    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits
    • Study Abroad

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  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    Porta Fiorentina

    by Cristian_Uluru Updated Aug 4, 2008

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    Porta Fiorentina
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    Porta Fiorentina is an Etruscan gataway restored in the 11th century and doing part of the medieval wall. You can see it walking toward the Roman Theatre.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

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    Via Porta all'Arco

    by Cristian_Uluru Updated Aug 3, 2008

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    Via Porta all'Arco
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    Via Porta all'Arco is fantastic scenographic street that connect Piazza dei Priori with Porta all'Arco. In this street you can see many medieval houses.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

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  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    Landscape

    by Cristian_Uluru Updated Aug 3, 2008

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    Tuscany countryside
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    In the terrace in front of the Porta dell'Arco you can have a wonderful view over the Tuscany countryside. Enjoy it.

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    • Historical Travel

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  • pigletsmom's Profile Photo

    Lovely Country Scenery

    by pigletsmom Written Mar 4, 2004

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    The lovely Italian countryside around Voterra

    The scenery around Volterra is very lovely. Take your time driving and you'll come across some lovely vistas.

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  • Bigs's Profile Photo

    Small streets

    by Bigs Written Nov 22, 2002

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    I think that all the small streets are having the most charm in Italian cities...... You sure can find them in Volterra too........

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    Volterra´s Flatiron Building

    by Bigs Written Nov 22, 2002

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    Volterras Flatiron Building

    It seems that many Italian cities have their special flatiron buildings.... This in Volterra is on the edge over the Anfiteatro.......

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Volterra Off The Beaten Path

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