Perugia Things to Do

  • Corso Vanucci
    Corso Vanucci
    by croisbeauty
  • Things to Do
    by croisbeauty
  • Chiesa di San Pietro
    Chiesa di San Pietro
    by croisbeauty

Most Recent Things to Do in Perugia

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Torre degli Sciri

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 23, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Torre degli Sciri

    At the end of Via dei Priori stands the Torre degli Sciri (the Tower of Sciri family), dating back in the 12th century, the only one remaind intact among the numerous ones which existed in the town, punctually demolished when the owners were banished.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Chiesa di San Filipo Neri

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 23, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chiesa di San Filipo Neri

    The Church of San Filipo Neri is the most important and the only authentic Baroque building in the town.
    The Vignola-styled facade dates back to 1665 and was designed by Roman architect Paolo Morucelli, while the church itself was built tetween 1627 and 1634.
    With its barrel vaulted single nave and lateral chapels, the interior is richly decorated with frescoes of a variety of painters who worked on them between the 17th and the 18th century.
    "The Immaculate Conception" above the main altar is by Pietro da Cortona, and was painted in 1662.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Oratorio di San Bernardino

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 23, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Oratorio di San Bernardino
    1 more image

    San Bernardino da Siena stayed in Perugia five times during the first half of the 15th century. The Saint influenced greatly the life of the town and this fact is proved by the reform of the statutes - STATUTA BERNARDINIANA - and by the spread of the devotion to Jesus Christ's name, testified by three letters IHS, inscribed on many architraves.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Rocca Paolina

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 23, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rocca Paolina

    The grandiose fortress built by the will of Paolo III Farnese in record time between 1540 and 1543, occupied the area of the heavily populated medieval quarter where the houses of the Bglioni family stood.
    It was erected under the guidanceof the archirect Antonio da Sangallo il Gionave, through a system of spurs and casemats for its five levels with an additional smaller fortress downhill, called the Tenaglia.
    The massive structure continued to be a symbol of dominance over the people of Perugia for more than three hundred years.
    Immediately following the formation of the Kingdom of Italy the Perugians destroyed it to celebrate their liberation from the much hated Papal regime.
    All that is left of the building is the retaining walls of one of the spurs, where in area a number of large roomsnow used for various purposes.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Palazzo del Capitano del Popolo

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 23, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Palazzo del Capitano del Popolo
    1 more image

    Piazza Metteoti, originally known as Piazza del Sopramuro, was built in the second half of the 13th century over a very steep area just outside the old Etruscan walls.
    The square is supported by walls built against the cliffside, from which is original name derived (Sopramuro translates as above the wall).
    The works were directed by Fra Bevigna, also responsable for supervising the works on Piazza Grande (Piazza IV Novembre) and its fountain.
    Used as a market place, the square had an open view over the valley bellow until the Palazzo del Capitano del Popolo and the adjacent Universita Vecchia closed it during the 15th century and gave it its current appearance.
    Palazzo del Capitano del Popolo is rare combination of Medieval and Renaissance architecture.
    Erected between 1472 and 1481 by the Lombard architects Gasparino di Antonio and Leone di Matteo.
    The Palace has a doorway similar in style to the Palazzo dei Priori, while its twin-windoes are trimmed with Renaissance wreaths. The half moon above the doorway contains a statue representing Justice.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Via Maesta delle Volte

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 23, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Via Maesta delle Volte
    4 more images

    At the beginning of the street, which is situated a foot of Piazza IV Novembre, there are still remains of a vaulting that supported a hall of the medieval Palazzo della Podesta, destroyed by fire in 1534.
    Red and white striped arch is all that remains of the Gothic portico of the 14th century Maesta delle Volte Oratory. This was replaced by a Renaissance whose 1590 facade is still in place.
    Now a religious westment shop, the interior is decorated with a fresco of the Madonna dated at around 1330.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Chiesa di S. Pietro

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 23, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chiesa di San Pietro
    4 more images

    In front of the building is an elegant porticoed courtyard, which one enters by means of a 17th century loggia. The building is dominated by a beautiful bell tower, which has an elevated spire and is exquisitely decorated by mullioned windows with two lights situated above a series of large jutting corbels, which resemble a cornice. The bell tower was designed by Rossellino and completed by Giovanni di Betto and Puccio di Paolo in the 15th century.
    The interior of the basilica is divided into a nave and two aisles by 18 Roman columns from the original church. The church, built in the 10th century on the site of the ancient cathedral, has a lacunar ceiling over the nave by Benedetto di Montepulciano. There are ten large canvases by Aliense, depicting Scenes from the Old and new Testament decorating the nave.
    In the sacristy are works by Perugino, Caravaggio, and Algardi. The Chapel of the Sacrament contains paintings by Vasari and "Pieta" by Perugino.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Basilica di S.Domenico

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 23, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Basilica di San Domenico
    4 more images

    The imposing Gothic construction from 14th century was rebuilt by Carlo Maderno in the first half of the 17th century. On either side of the bare facade are buttreses which continue around to the sides of the church. An elegant late 16th century portal and a double flight of steps decorate the facade.
    The enormous stark interior of the church contains side chapels. The fourth chapel on the right is a part of the original building and contains an altar frontal by Antonio di Antonio di Duccio.The transept chapels contain many votive frescoes. Works of art include an 18th century organ, the Tomb of Elisabetta Cantucci - carved by Algardi, the Tomb of Danti family, the splendid tomb of Pope Benedict XI, the work of pupil of Arnolfo di Cambio.
    The apse is lit by a large window, 23 meters in hight, beautifully decorated by Fra' Bartolomeo di Pietro and Mariotto di Nardo.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Museo Archeologico

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 23, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Museo Archeologico
    2 more images

    Next to the Basilica of St. Domenic stands the Cloister, in two orders of loggias, it is practicaly annexed to the basilica.
    In the background stands the mighty campanile of the Basilica of St. Domenic.
    Nowadays the cloister houses Archeological Museum of Umbria and it is absolutely a must see when visiting Perugia.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Porta di San Angelo

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 23, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Porta di San Angelo
    2 more images

    Porta di San Angelo, the Gate of St. Angelo, stands at the end of Corso Garibaldi, the main street of part of the city that was surrounded by walls between the 13th and the 14th century.
    In 1479 a massive donjon was erected to surmount the gate.
    It is situated just a foot from the Tempio of San Angelo, and you can't miss it.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Porta di San Ercolano

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 23, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Porta di San Ercolano
    1 more image

    Arco di San Ercolano originally had arch composed of a double row of arched lintels. These were replaced by a pointed arch during the Middle Ages. Arco stands on the stairs that bear the same name.
    Originally called Porta Cornea, this arch displays the typical pointed arch structure along with its original piers and a rounded hewn stone that recalls the formerly existing round arch.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Porta di San Pietro

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 23, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Porta di San Pietro
    2 more images

    The outside of Porta di San Pietro (the Gate of St. Peter) was designed by Agostino di Duccio of Florence in 1475 to 1480.
    It is one of the most symbolical monument of the Renaissance period in Perugia and was inspired by L.B. Albertis examples such as the Malatesta Temple in Rimini.
    The upper part was never completed with a battlement.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Madonna della Luce

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 23, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Madonna della Luce
    1 more image

    The small but beautiful church of Madonna della Luce and the cloister next to it is situated in the vicinity of Piazza San Francesco. Unfortunately, I have no informations regarding this church, if anybody can help me about I´ll be very gratefull.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Porta Trasimena

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 23, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Porta Trasimena
    1 more image

    Between the 6th and the 3rd centuries BC, Perugia was fortified by massive town walls in travertine blocks that followed the hilly ground around the city and are still largely visible today, particularly to the west and north.
    Seven gates, of which six still exist although they were partly modified by the Romans and in the Middle Ages, allowed access into town.
    The Porta Trasimena, also called Arco di San Luca, at the end of Via dei Priori retains only the Etruscan piers.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Chiesa di San Francesco

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 23, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chiesa di San Francesco
    1 more image

    Adjacent to the Oratory of San Bernardino is the suggestive Church of St. Francis.
    Erected in the half of the 13th century by the Friars Minor, it has one nave with transept and polygonal apse. It was often restored, as it was in the occasion of my visit to Perugia, to prevent collapses owing to the crumbly soil.
    In 1926 the original facade was brought back to its original conditions.
    The church, besides housing the tombs of Braccio Fortebraccio and of the jurist Bartolo di Sasso ferrato, comprised many work of art, later transferred elswhere.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Perugia

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

60 travelers online now

Comments

Perugia Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Perugia things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Perugia sightseeing.

View all Perugia hotels