Perugia Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by croisbeauty
  • Things to Do
    by croisbeauty
  • Things to Do
    by croisbeauty

Best Rated Things to Do in Perugia

  • Angelinka's Profile Photo

    Priori Palace-Palazzo dei Priori

    by Angelinka Updated Jan 26, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Priori Palace dominant expression of the spirit of the period of comuni, was built between XIII and XV century. From the main door you can visit the National Gallery of Umbria.

    Il Palazzo dei Priori, superba espressione dello spirito comunale della città, fu eretto tra il XIII e il XV secolo. Dal questo portale si entra alla Galleria Nazionale dell’Umbria

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Cathedral of San Lorenzo

    by karenincalifornia Updated Mar 3, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Cathedral of San Lorenzo stands out as the centerpiece of Perugia. It is a huge cathedral, but without the ornate facade of many Italian cathedrals. Building of this cathedral began in the 1300s and it was not completed until over 200 years later.

    Inside the church is a crucifix protected by glass. This is a symbol of Perugia's revolt against the Pope during the "Salt War" (1540) which broke out as a result of a popular uprising against the imposition of a tax on salt by the Farnese Pope, Paolo lII. Perugia reacted by calling for a complete boycott on salt, but resisted the Pope's acts of aggression only briefly before being conquered by Pier Luigi Farnese, the Pope's nephew. I suppose it is rather difficult to resist a palace coup if your main strategy consists of cutting salt out of the diet.

    The Salt War has had a long-lasting effect on all of Umbria. Umbrian bread, even today, it is baked without salt, a relic from the days when the local citizens rebelled against paying the salt tax by not using it in their cooking.

    Today, back at home in California, I often make bread without salt. It tastes different from all other American bread, which does have salt, but my family often yearns for that delicious Umbrian bread, so I leave the salt out of it. See my Todi travelogue Delicious Umbrian Dishes for my recipe for Umbrian bread - my attempt to get as close as possible to the kind of heavenly bread we had in Umbria.

    Cathedral of San Lorenzo, Perugia, italy
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Galleria Nazionale dell'Umbria

    by karenincalifornia Updated Mar 29, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Galleria Nazionale dell'Umbria (National Gallery of Umbria) is housed in the Palazzo dei Priori right on the Piazza Novembre IV. This art museum displays works of famous Italian artists, such as Duccio, Fra Angelico, Piero della Francesca, Arnolfo di Cambio, Gentile di Fabriano, Orazio Gentileschi, Pietro di Cortona. When we were there, the museum had a special exhibit of the works of Perugino, the famous Italian painter who lived from 1446 to 1524. Perugino founded a school of art in Perugia and was in high demand for his religious paintings and frescoes throughout Italy.

    The museum is well laid out and has many impressive works of art on display. Even with the crowds of the Umbrian Jazz Festival, the museum was not crowded. This is a very good place to see the works of some of Italy's and Umbria's finest artists.

    The cost of admittance is € 12,00. You will required to check your coat and all bags before viewing the exhibits. You will, however, be permitted to carry around your "documents" - your passport and cash and other valuables - in a clear plastic bag provided by the coat check desk.

    Galleria Nazionale dell'Umbira, Perugia, Italy
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Etruscan Arch

    by karenincalifornia Updated Mar 3, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You'll hear a lot about the Etruscan Arch in Perugia. For good reason. The arch was originally constructed by the Etruscans in 3rd century B.C. Two hundred years later, the Romans restored the arch during the recontruction of the city. At the same time, the city was renamed "Augusta Perusia". The name can be read over the arch.

    While Perugia was under control of the Pope during the 16th century, the loggia over one of the buttresses and the fountain at the bottom were added.

    Etruscan Arch in Perugia, Italy
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Rocca Paolina

    by karenincalifornia Updated Mar 29, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you park your car in one of the large lots on the south side of the city (Partigiani or Europa), you will walk through what will seem like catacombs before you climb to the surface.

    This is the underside of the fortress of Rocca Paolina. It is actually a portion of medieval Perugia with its ancient houses and streets. After the Pope conquered Perugia in 1540 (the "Salt War"), he erected a fortress, the Rocca Paolina, on top of part of the city, and specifically on top of the residences of the town leaders who tried to resist the papal aggression.

    I can just hear the Pope's comments about those salt boycotting Perugian rebels: "Don't send the rebels to the dungeon, let the dungeon come to the rebels."

    Ancient medieval town under Rocca Paolina
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Umbria Jazz Festival

    by karenincalifornia Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We visited Perugia on the opening day of the Umbria Jazz Festival 2004. The city had such an air of energy and excitement. Performances began at around 2:00 pm. If we had stayed through the evening, we would have seen BB King. Other Jazz artists performing in 2004 were George Clinton Parliament/Funkadelic, Jack DeJohnette, Keith Jarrett, James Brown, Patti LaBelle, The Manhattan Transfer, The Count Basie Orchestra, Alicia Keyes, Burt Bacharach, The Standford University Jazz Band and many others.

    The dates of the 2005 Jazz Festival are 08 July 2005 to 17 July 2005. Arrive early in the day in Perugia to avoid parking problems.

    Umbrian Jazz Festival, Perugia, Italy
    Related to:
    • Music
    • Festivals

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Fontana Maggiore

    by croisbeauty Updated Jan 27, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Great Fountain stands in the central Piazza IV Novembre, the main tourist attraction and monumental heart of medieval Perugia.
    The fountain was built in 1275-1278 and designed by Fra' Bevignate, assisted by Boninsegna da Venezia. The marble decorative sculptures were carved by Nicola and Giovanni Pisano, who also built the three bronze Waer Carriers. The casting of the top bronze basin and column is attributed by Rosso Padellaio. The upper stone basin, sustained by small columns with capitals, consists of 24 red marble panels separated by 24 statues.
    The bas-reliefs represent Views, Historical events, Scenes from the Bible, Saints, etc. The lower basin has 50 panels, on which are descripted the Months of the Year, the Signs of the Zodiac, Liberal Arts, Scenes from the Old Testament, the Founding of Rome, Aesop's Fables.

    Fontana Maggiore
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Rocca Paolina

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 23, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The grandiose fortress built by the will of Paolo III Farnese in record time between 1540 and 1543, occupied the area of the heavily populated medieval quarter where the houses of the Bglioni family stood.
    It was erected under the guidanceof the archirect Antonio da Sangallo il Gionave, through a system of spurs and casemats for its five levels with an additional smaller fortress downhill, called the Tenaglia.
    The massive structure continued to be a symbol of dominance over the people of Perugia for more than three hundred years.
    Immediately following the formation of the Kingdom of Italy the Perugians destroyed it to celebrate their liberation from the much hated Papal regime.
    All that is left of the building is the retaining walls of one of the spurs, where in area a number of large roomsnow used for various purposes.

    Rocca Paolina
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Foreigner's University (Università per Stranieri)

    by karenincalifornia Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Foreigner's University is housed in the 18th century Pallazo Gallanga Stuart. This University was founded at the beginning of 1900 for the purpose of sending Italian culture abroad.

    Today, the University remains devoted to the study of Italian language, art, history, and culture. It is the top language school for foreigners in the country, and courses run 1 to 6 months.

    Wouldn't a six month sabbatical studying Italian in Perugia be a blast?

    Palazzo Gallenga Stuart, Perugia, IT
    Related to:
    • Study Abroad

    Was this review helpful?

  • maritagnes's Profile Photo

    Chiesa di San Pietro

    by maritagnes Updated Aug 11, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    San Pietro is situated outside the city walls on Borgo XX Giugno. The church is richly decorated and it's belltower is one of the most important landmarks in Perugia.

    The church was founded as a Benedictine abbey in the 10th century, and were in early times in use as the cathedral as Perugia.
    Later San Lorenzo became the cathedral.

    San Pietro - belltower
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Via Maesta delle Volte

    by croisbeauty Updated Jan 28, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    At the beginning of the street, which is situated a foot of Piazza IV Novembre, there are still remains of a vaulting that supported a hall of the medieval Palazzo della Podesta, destroyed by fire in 1534.
    Red and white striped arch is all that remains of the Gothic portico of the 14th century Maesta delle Volte Oratory. This was replaced by a Renaissance whose 1590 facade is still in place.
    Now a religious westment shop, the interior is decorated with a fresco of the Madonna dated at around 1330.
    Entering into the dim Via Maesta delle Volte, which connects Piazza IV Novembre with Piazza Cavallotti, we immerse in the fascinating history of this city which is full of pleasant surprises. Here we can see the early-Gothic porticoes that follow the line of the Etruscan city walls built A.D. Burned Palazzo del Podesta was never rebuilt because the Pope banned podesta from Perugia. Here we can see the fresco of "Maesta" from 1330, as well as the remains of an Renaissance palace, also never rebuilt. Finally, here we find the fountain from 1927, that perfectly fit into the environment as if it was built in the Middle Ages.

    Via Maesta delle Volte remains of Palazzo della Podesta remains of the oratory Via Maesta delle Volte
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Palazzo del Capitano del Popolo

    by croisbeauty Updated Jan 26, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Piazza Metteoti, originally known as Piazza del Sopramuro, was built in the second half of the 13th century over a very steep area just outside the old Etruscan walls.
    The square is supported by walls built against the cliffside, from which is original name derived (Sopramuro translates as above the wall).
    The works were directed by Fra Bevigna, also responsable for supervising the works on Piazza Grande (Piazza IV Novembre) and its fountain.
    Used as a market place, the square had an open view over the valley bellow until the Palazzo del Capitano del Popolo and the adjacent Universita Vecchia closed it during the 15th century and gave it its current appearance.
    Palazzo del Capitano del Popolo is rare combination of Medieval and Renaissance architecture.
    Erected between 1472 and 1481 by the Lombard architects Gasparino di Antonio and Leone di Matteo.
    The Palace has a doorway similar in style to the Palazzo dei Priori, while its twin-windoes are trimmed with Renaissance wreaths. The half moon above the doorway contains a statue representing Justice.

    Palazzo del Capitano del Popolo
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Corso Vanucci

    by croisbeauty Updated Jan 27, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The heart of the town of Perugia is the grand Corso Vanucci, a wide pedestrian boulevard lined with museums, shops and cafes.
    The Corso is a vibrant shopping street that is filled with people until late in the evenings, as people come out to indulge in the traditional Italian "passeggiata", or evening stroll.
    During festivals, such as Umbria Jazz, the Corso Vanucci teems with people 24 hours a day.
    The street is named after the most famous son of Perugia, Pietro di Cristoforo Vanucci (1452-1523), who is much better known as Il Perugino. Perugino was great Renaissance painter of the famous Umbrian school, who left behind many invaluable works of art. Great Raffaello was his most famous pupil.
    Corso Vanucci runs from the Piazza Italia to the Piazza IV Novembre.

    Corso Vanucci
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Cattedrale di San Lorenzo

    by croisbeauty Updated Jan 29, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The first church on this place was built in the 9th century, above the remains of old Etrusco-Roman square. The same church was reconstructed during the 11th and 12th centuries, while in 1300 was decided to increase and expand its volume following the project of monk fra Brevignante. Brother Brevignante has made a project according to which the church is laid to the floor raised above the street level. The construction was delayed and lasted almost two centuries, until 1507, yet never completed, which is evident by the appearance of the front facade.
    The imposing Gothic temple, Cathedral of St. Lawrence, was constructed between the 14th and 15th century, although a large amount of its external facing remains incomplete.
    The simple, coarse stone facade has a massive Baroque portal by P. Carattoli. in the upper part of the facade is an enormous round window. The left side of the building, which look out over the central square, is decorated by a portal built by Alessi with ornamental masks by Scalza. Above the portal is a votive Crucifix, placed here by the people of Perugia in 1539.

    Cattedrale di San Lorenzo Cattedrale di San Lorenzo Cattedrale di San Lorenzo unfinished front facade
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Chiesa di San Filippo Neri

    by croisbeauty Updated Jan 26, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Church of San Filippo Neri is the most important and the only authentic Baroque building in the town.
    The Vignola-styled facade dates back to 1665 and was designed by Roman architect Paolo Morucelli, while the church itself was built between 1627 and 1634.
    With its barrel vaulted single nave and lateral chapels, the interior is richly decorated with frescoes of a variety of painters who worked on them between the 17th and the 18th century.
    "The Immaculate Conception" above the main altar is by Pietro da Cortona, and was painted in 1662.
    Oratorio di Santa Cecilia makes a whole with the church and is also built in Baroque style. The oratory was purpose built for musical devotion and is dedicated to Santa Cecilia, patron saint of music. It is a venue for concerts and other artistic events.

    chiesa di San Filippo Neri Oratorio di Santa Cecilia
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Perugia

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

24 travelers online now

Comments

Perugia Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Perugia things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Perugia sightseeing.

View all Perugia hotels