Treviso Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in Treviso

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    Treviso-orientation info/maps

    by BruceDunning Updated Aug 29, 2009

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    Description of the city
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    The town is rather easy to maneuver around once you are inside. What is not provided is directional signs to find key tourist sites. A good map helps to be able to make a circuit route of the special things to see. Treviso is called the city of art and water. There definitely is plenty of water, and it runs through the city fast and looks clean and green from the mountains. The art you need to search a bit more for, and the museums are sparse because 4 of the 5 are under "renovation", for how long, who knows.
    The city was formed in 89BC and Romans controlled for centuries. The Byzantine had the rule until 568, then Lombards and Franks had control for some times. In 1397 it became part of Venice republic. French had the rein for a while until Napoleon was defeated. The Austrians then took over, but lost out in 1848 Revolution of Italy. During WWI and WWII it was very much destroyed. Rebuilt to original condition is amazing.

    Parking inside of the walled area could be a challenge. A lot of traffic is going by fast and to find these may be difficult. We found a place/posta just south of the wall heading out of the city. It is hard to find a spot to park in the middle sector, and there are time limits.

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    Museo di Santa Caterina

    by Pinat Updated May 13, 2009

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    It is the main Treviso museum. a former church which has been restructured to house the Civic Museum.

    Tomaso da Modena's renowned St. Ursula frescoes are displayed in the centre of the church. You'll become familiar with the name of Tomaso da Modena as you tour Treviso. The fourteenth-century artist's charming frescoes are all around the city's churches and rank among the best art you'll see here.

    It's open from Tuesday to Sunday 9am-12:30 and 2:30-6pm. Entrance costs €3.

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    The Chiesa di San Nicolo - Interior

    by suvanki Updated Mar 10, 2009

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    Walking inside this vast church, I was surprised to see how light and airy it appeared. Sunlight streamed through the windows on two levels. It reflected off the shiny marble flooring too.

    In the late 19th century the church underwent a programme of restoration, with funds raised to preserve the buildings artistic heritage.
    The roof and ceiling were replaced, and red marble from Verona was used on the flooring
    Some parts of the structure that were 'out of character' were demolished.

    Unfortunately the church was bombed heavily on the 7th April 1944 causing severe damage to the roof, and the demolition of a part of the bell tower.

    The Nave is divided by two columns of pillars, that support the wooden ceiling.
    Some of these are decorated with frescoes by Tomaso da Modena and his pupils.
    These include - St Romuld, St Agnes and the Redemptor and St Jerome in his Study.(pic5)
    The 3 naves are ended by 3 apses ; the main one is the presbytery, which contains sculpturework by Antonio Rizzo and a painting by Lotto.

    On the walls are many more frescoes (pic 4)

    On the wall facing the doorway is an organ loft by Gaetano Callido (1778 - 1779) . Underneath this are more frescoes. (pics 2&3)

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    The City Walls

    by suvanki Updated Mar 10, 2009

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    Part of Trevisos City Walls and River Sile

    Treviso has been fortified since its early days, when it was an important Roman Settlement.

    The walls seen today date from the 16th century. Under orders from the Venetian Republic, they were re-inforced and enlarged during the time of Fra' Giocondo and later Bartolomeo D' Alviano. Treviso was seen as an important land defence for Venice.

    The walls spread for nearly 4km, with circular keeps and 3 important gateways into the city- These being ; San Tommaso, Santi Quaranta and Altinia.

    The River Sile flows by the walls, giving a moat - like appearance.

    It is quite a pleasant walk (or jogging route- there were plenty of people pounding the pathway), around the perimeter walls, there are marked cycle lanes too.

    At the time of my visit, it was a lovely crisp December day with blue skies and sunshine- so perfect for enjoying the views of the river.

    Although a busy road runs parallel, it wasn't too difficult to 'shut out' the traffic noise.

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    Chiesa di S. Martino

    by suvanki Updated Mar 10, 2009

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    Chiesa di Santo Martino Treviso
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    Leaving the train station, I set off towards the Centro, by Via Roma, which leads into Corso Del Popolo. I nearly walked past this church, set in a small plazza off this street.

    It was a modern round shaped building. I wasn't sure if it was open, but luckily it was - Wow! I wasn't expecting anything like this. I'm glad that I took some photos or I'd have thought that I'd imagined it - especially as when I tried to find out more about it I couldn't find anything in the info I had on Treviso.

    I found out that during the allied bombing raid of 7th April 1944, the church of Sant Martino was hit, so presumably, this church was built in its place.

    Inside the church was a crucifix , which was in memory of the victims of the bombing. I picked up a card with a photo of this, but the info is in Italian. I think it states that it is to commemorate the 102 members of the parish that died on that day. I think the bronze figure of Christ was rescued from the old church, (it is dated 1750) and dedicated to this church on 7th April 1984. If this is correct, it looks quite contemporary in its wooden crucifix casing. I'm afraid that I didn't get a photo of this, as there were people praying nearby.

    The church inside was light and airy, with many bright paintings and frescoes. There was also quite a bit of useful information in Italian and English.

    The foundation stone was laid by the then Bishop of Treviso, Mons. Antonio Mistrorigo on 19th March 1960. The structure was completed in less than 2 years. The ceremony of consecration by the Bishop took place on December 5th 1970.
    The architect was a Sig. Tramontini. His plan was for an aiseless church of 400 square metres.

    One of the churches unusual features is the use of 2 load bearing pillars,(pic 2) that support the ceiling without walls - these walls were added much later!

    These 2 pillars start at the foundations crowfoot shaped, then rise, increasing in diameter, towards the dome, as they do so, they project forwards to the apse and to the exterior, 'til they blend in with the dome itself.

    The church was planned not just to be aesthetically pleasing, but its structure is also based on symbolism.

    Firstly, Everything must rise high - the columns, walls and dome - as well as the floor (as you can see from pic 1, the church is raised on a platform) this is all to symbolize the idea that human life must aim at Christ and at the Kingdom of Heaven.

    The 14 side walls are staggered at one with the other, and built in brickwork - This symbolizes the straits, troubles and sufferings which affect man, but draw him to eternal life. They also represent the 14 stations of the cross.

    The church was also planned to expound the evangelical parable of the Grain of Mustard - the believers have a feeling they are under the leafy branches of the tree the Gospel talks about - Apparently the outside is meant to look like a tree shape, with its green dome looking like leaves!

    The apse is 'an architectonic body' added to the main body of the building. Its' white marble round structure represents the Tent - (Tabernacle), where Christ offers his real and sacramental presence among man on earth.

    On the Holy table, which is constructed from engraved white marble, is a representation of a pelican!! - this bird feeds its young on its own blood - again this has strong Christological reference!

    On the parapet, which is carved from onyx, there is a carving of the Lamb God drinking from the spring, from which 7 streams gush - This symbolizes the Seven Sacraments.

    The floor is covered with marble tiles, alternative red and white , which symbolize the Holy Rood - red = blood, white = water, which spouted from Christs crucified chest as a symbol of redemption.

    I was very impressed with this church, it was very memorable, and I spent quite a while looking around.

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    Museo Civico Luigi Bailo

    by STEFZAMM Updated Mar 10, 2009

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    Museo Luigi Bailo - Treviso

    I walked all the way to this museum but it was closed ! Apparently they are refurbishing it and everything was moved to another museum which was situated on the other side of the city and then I really had no time to get there. I understand from what I found that once this is refurbished it will be up and running for visitors again.
    I found that this museum had an archeological collection and art gallery. It contains frescoes by Tommaso da Modena & Giloramo da Treviso, there are also pictures by Bellini, Lotto, Titian and other famous artists. In February 2009 this museum was closed and everything was moved to the convent of Saint Catherine - (Convento di Santa Caterina).

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    Cathedral of San Pietro

    by STEFZAMM Updated Mar 10, 2009

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    Cathedral of San Pietro - Treviso
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    The dome of Treviso or the Cathedral is dedicated to St. Peter. This cathedral was built in the 15th & 16th century where once used to be a Romanesque church, evidence of this is the crypt which dates back to the 11th and 12th century. The exterior was completed in 1836. It was a shame for me to enter this huge empty church, we were the only visitors. On the left hand side facing the altar there is another small altar with a notice for tourists that this is only for prayer well I'm catholic and I'm tourist so I decided to walk in, kneel down and thank the lord for so much marvels in this world and for being so happy that day. I got up and took a picture. May I remind you that this church was empty and I could not bother any catholics that might have been praying yet as soon as I leave this small altar I find this very stupid lady that stood there waiting for me with her hands crossed as though I was five years old at school and had a row at me, well I explained to her that I did take a photo but I intentionally went in to pray but she was very rude and abrupt. This other prayer to god was slightly different now, I was actually telling him "Why is that some people that represent your church are so unfriendly??" and I walked on admiring the church turning round to take a photo of the main altar now before I went out and this same lady again brought this huge, mega large sweeping mop that I've never ever seen in my life and she went to and forth from left to right of the altar to clean the floor, so there went my picture! Generally I love to visit churches they make me happy and I cannot explain why but this cathedral in Treviso was so unwelcoming thanks to the lady or one of them that takes care of it. I hope your visit to the cathedral of Treviso will be somehow a better experience than mine. The opening hours are between 7:30am and 12:00pm

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    Piazza Del Duomo

    by STEFZAMM Updated Mar 10, 2009

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    Piazza del Duomo - Treviso
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    I was not impressed with this piazza as it looked more of a wide road with ample space for parking to me rather than a piazza or Piazza del Duomo. You will only visit this piazza to visit the duomo - (cathedral) or the baptistry which is close by the cathedral so it can also be seen from this piazza.

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    Palazzo Dei Trecento

    by STEFZAMM Updated Mar 10, 2009

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    On the door step of Palazzo dei Trecento
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    This Palazzo was built around 1185 and completed around 1268. It was used as a hall for public meetings. The name was derived from the 300 council memebers that it had called 'il Maggior Consiglio' - (The big council). Just like the other buildings in Piazza dei Signiori this was rebuilt again after the 1944 bombing and if one goes round this building you can still figure out what was left from the bombing and what was constructed after the bombing. I believe the purpose of leaving these signs is another sort of remembrance. If you would like to see pictures of the bombing you would be able to see clearly the sings on this building today. These pictures are found under the arcades just opposite the Palazzo dei Trecento. I was very disappointed when I found out that this palace was closed for visitors since I was there during opening hours. I asked the locals if they had any idea why this was closed but they did not have an answer. From what I found as with this palazzo and other places of interest, people in Treviso don't really cater for tourism and at least the ones I asked seems they are not so knowledgeable about the treasures of their own city. Well the opening hours if you are lucky for this palazzo are: Tue - Sat, from 9am to 12pm.

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    Torre Del Comune

    by STEFZAMM Updated Mar 10, 2009

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    %b Torre del Comune - Treviso

    Torre del Comune or also called Torre Civica is also situated in Piazza dei Signiori just on top of the Palazzo della Podesta. Just like the palazzo, this big bell tower was built in the 13th century and then re built in the 19th century in gothic style, this was after the bombing of the 1944. This big bell is said to be heard twice daily at 9am and 5pm to advise the locals that it is the beginning or the end of their working day and also at noon along with other bells in other towers or churches around Treviso. Interesting to say while I was at the Piazza dei Signoiri just as soon as we arrived in Treviso I was telling my friends the time when the bell rings and as soon as I finished it rang!!! .. and it was mid night so yes this bell does also ring at mid night. It also rings on December 31st at mid night and on the 7th of April to remember the tragic bombing of 1944. If you would like to find more about the 1944 bombing as per my tips there are some very nice pictures along the arcades of the buildings in Piazza dei Signiori where they captured the remainings from the bombing. It is very interesting.

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    Palazzo Della Podesta

    by STEFZAMM Updated Mar 10, 2009

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    Palazzo della Podesta - Treviso (main entrance)
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    This Palazzo was built in the 13th century and it is situated in Piazza dei Signiori on the north side of the square. This Palazzo has the big bell tower. This building was re built in the 19th century in a Gothic style. Palazzo della Podesta is also known as Pallazzo della Prefettura because today it houses the prefect's office.

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    Piazza Dei Signiori

    by STEFZAMM Updated Mar 9, 2009

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    Piazza dei Signiori - Treviso

    Piazza dei Signiori is the main square in Treviso, it is situated in the centre of Treviso. It houses the Palazzo dei Trecento , once being the council of the town and the Palazzo della Podesta with the tall Torre del Comune. The Palazzo Pretorio which is a renaissance palace houses the town council. Today this piazza is the main hub of the city and besides these large architectural buildings it also holds a cafeteria where one can sip on coffee and enjoy the everyday life.

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    The Chieso di San Nicolo - Paintings

    by suvanki Written Jan 17, 2009

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    St Christopher Fresco Chiesa di San Nicolo
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    Besides the frescoes by Tomaso di Modeno mentioned in my previous tip, there were many other works of art, from different periods and in different styles.

    One piece that caught my eye straight away, was the fresco of St Christopher, in the right nave, next to the organ - It was hard to miss this painting, as it reached nearly upto the ceiling!

    Another painting that I liked was one from the 16th Century, by G. Carboncino 'Il Beauto e Susone e L'Addolorate', particularly the painting of 2 male characters in it (pic 2)

    One that fascinated me, was 'Madonna con Bambino e I Santi Pietro e Paolo' a 15th century piece by A. Vivarini. (pics 3-5) It made me feel quite uneasy looking at the 6 characters- I'm not sure if this was the intended effect of the artist. The saints looked quite sinister, the cherubs quite surley and The Virgin Mary and Christ child quite demonic.

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    THE CHIESA DI SAN NICOLÒ -History and Exterior

    by suvanki Updated Jan 17, 2009

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    CHIESA DI SAN NICOL��
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    I'd initially thought that I'd arrived at the Duoma (The Cathedral) due to the vast size of this church, and also because I'd read articles complaining about the front of the Duoma being a Car Park.
    I'd arrived at San Nicolo from its car park, where a rather harrassed attendant was directing cars, and collecting payment.

    The Chiesa di San Nicolò dates from the beginning of 14th century and was built by the Dominican fraternity.

    This was mainly funded and encouraged by Friar Niccolò Boccalino’s legacies, (He was better known as "Pope Benedetto XI". )

    The Church was located west of the centre of Treviso, at the point where the most urbanized area ended and the uncultivated lands began.

    Construction of the church was delayed, due to two significant events. Firstly, by the collapse of a bell tower, which demolished most of underlying chapels, and then by The Plague, which affected Treviso in the first half of 14th century.
    Later, the Church was damaged by enemy bombs on the night of 7th April 1944.

    Apparently, The Chiesa di San Nicolò 'represents a moment of transition between the strong Romanesque style and the Gothic style'.

    Its red brick exterior is quite simple, but also quite imposing.

    Open 07.00-12.00 and 15.30-19.00
    Free Entrance

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    Ponte San Martino

    by suvanki Updated Jan 17, 2009

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    Ponte San Martino
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    Shortly after leaving the railway station, I came across this bridge crossing the River Sile (or Sil) - The River of Silence.

    I spent quite a while enjoying the views up and down river

    to be continued...

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