Local traditions and culture in Venice

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Most Viewed Local Customs in Venice

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    Ca' d'Oro

    by croisbeauty Written Oct 14, 2011

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    Palazzo Santa Sofia is far better known as Ca' d'Oro (golden house) gue to the gilt and polychrome external decorations which once adorned its walls. It is one of the oldest palaces on Canal Grande built between 1428 and 1430 for the noble family Contarini who provided Venice with eight doges. The architect who designed and built the palace was Giovanni Bon and his son Bartolomeo. These two architects and sculptors epitomises the Gothic style in Venice and are better known for their works on the Doges Palace.
    Following the fall of the Republic in 1797 the palace changed ownership in several times. The ballet dancer Marie Taglioni, who was owner in the 19th sentury, removed the Gothic stairway from the inner courtyard and destroyed the ornate balconies overlooking the court. The last owner, Baron Giorgio Franchetti, bequeathed the palace to the state and its open now for the public as a gallery.

    Ca' d'Oro Ca' dOro

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    Cimitero - Isola di San Michele

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 14, 2011

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    The small island San Michele used to be the prison, untill the Napoleon's occupation when occupying forces decreed that Venetians could not bury their deceased on any of the main islands, but only on San Michele.
    San Cristoforo, another small island, become a cemetery in 1807 but then the chanel that separated the two islands was filled in during 1836 and now it is what we know as San Michele. The bodies were carried to the island on special funeral gondolas.
    San Michele is used for cemetary even today, some famous people were buried here: Igor Stravinsky, Ezra Pound, Joseph Brodsky, Horation Brown, just to mentione few of them.
    Great architect Mauro Codussi built the church of San Michele at the island, in 1469, and it was the the first church in Venice built in Renaissance style.

    Cimitero di San Michele Isola di San Michele

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    The home of Cimarosa

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 14, 2011

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    Domenico Cimarosa (1749-1801) was Italian composer, writing more then eighty operas, both comic and serious. He was very popular at his times for the Opera Buffa, Italian comic opera full of humour and accentricity. A part of his short life Cimarosa spent abroad, in St.Petersburg by invitation of Empress Catherine II, remaining there at the court for four years. Cimarosa was also invited by Emperor Leopold II to come to Vienna, where he produced his masterpiece "Il Matrimonio Segreto" /secret marriage).

    Ca' di Domenico Cimarosa Ca' di Domenico Cimarosa

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    Ca' Pesaro

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 14, 2011

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    Most of the superb Venetian palaces facing Canal Grande and Ca' Pesaro is certainly one of the most famous. The palace is set around the courtyard and was designed by Baldassare Longhena who reiterpreted the great Jacopo Sansovino. Today, it houses the International Gallery of Modern Art with works by the most important twentieth century artists, such as Kandinsky, Miro, Morandi etc. The Upper floor is dedicated to Museo d'Arte Orientale, containing objects from Japan, China and Indonesia.

    Ca' Pesaro Ca' Pesaro
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    Fondaco dei Turchi

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 14, 2011

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    Fondaco dei Turchi was originally built in the 13th century as a palace for the Pesaro family, that's why some Venetians call it Palazzo Pesaro. Built in Venetian-Byzantine style originally used as a trading depot for the goods from the East. In the 14th century it was given to Nicolo d'Este who was lord of the town of Ferrara. In the beginning of the 17th century Palazzo Pesaro became the "Fontego" for Turkish merchants , place to live and do business.
    From 1865 the building was restored and housed Museo Correr. Since 1923 it is Natural History Museum with two million objects in the collection; botanical and zoological specimens, fossils and ethnographic collections.

    Fondaco dei Turchi
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    Museo Storico Navale

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 13, 2011

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    Museo storico Navale, situated in the Sestiere Castello and close to Aesenale, is devoted to naval and nautical history. It is one of the Venice's less visited museums. The museum has a very wide selection of objects and artefacts to do with nautical and Venetian history. Here one could see boats through the history and course the historic gondolas.
    The museum is at the adress: Riva S.Biasio 2148, Castello
    Open from monday to saturday from 8:45 to 13:30, closed on Sunday
    Admission something less then 2 euros

    Museo Storico Navale
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    Teatro Goldoni

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 13, 2011

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    Teatro Goldoni has been founded in 1622 under the name of Teatro San Luca, known also as Teatre Vendramin after the name of the owners. Later on it was renamed Teatro Apollo and since 1875 is called Teatro Goldoni. Carlo Goldoni was the greatist Venetian dramatist of all times.
    The theatre had many changes and renovations due to fire or structural failures. This theatre had been the first in Italy to install gas lighting.

    Teatro Goldoni Teatro Goldoni

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    Palazzo Cavalli - Franchetti

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 13, 2011

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    Palazzo Cavalli-Franchetti is situated on the Canal Grande and next to Ponte dell'Accademia. It is 16th century and renewed in the 19th century enriched in Venetian Gothic style with rich window framing. The neo-Gothic improvements were made around mid of the 19th century when the palace become property of Hambsurgs. Close to end of the 19th century the palace was bought by the Baron Franchetti who married girl from the Vienna Rotchilds. In 1922 the palace was sold to the Istituto Federale di Credito per il Risorgimento della Venezia. Since 1999 it is the seat of the Istituto Veneto di Scienza and frequently houses cultural events.

    Palazzo Cavalli - Franchetti Palazzo Cavalli - Franchetti
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    Galleria d'arte Contini

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 12, 2011

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    The Art Gallery Contini is situated in Calle Larga XXII Marzo, Sestiere San Marco. It is open every day from 10:30 - 19:30 and admission is free.
    Galleria d'arte Contini is point of reference for the international art market of the most prestigious names, intereted in in modern and contemporary painting and sculpture.

    Galleria d'arte Contini Galleria Contini Galleria Contini

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    Market Shopping--Fish and more

    by painterdave Written Jun 6, 2011

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    The people of Venice are known for their preparation of seafood, but where do they buy it? They visit the huge market along the canal, and purchase their vegetables, fruit, and seafood in the morning. This large market is a must see for a tourist, don't miss it.
    There are also a few small bars there and you can have a cappuccino, sit and watch the action. The people working in the market do not mind having their photo taken as they are used to it.
    But the seagulls.... ha they are the real actors.

    market from canal gull thief vegetable seller small shellfish called bovolotti
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    Rialto Markets - Ever since the year 1079.

    by Jerelis Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    One huge advantage of sleeping in the city of Venice itself is that you´re able to strawl through the streets early without having the masses of tourists around you. It´s also best to arrive early at the Rialto Markets if you want to see the Pescaria (fish market) and Erbaria (vegetable market) in full swing. The barges start arriving at dawn and the vendors are bargaining with costumers by 77 or 8 am. The wholesalers and most retailers close up by midday, so stock up on fruit, vegetables and photo opportunities before lunch!

    When strolling at the market you can trully sense the vibe that ever since the year 1097 Venetians have depended on the Rialto Markets for their daily supplies of fish, vegetables, fruit and other foodstuffs. The markets are open to the public and at the early hours there is no better show in town. Stevendors unload crates of produce from gbarges, vendors hawk their wares, restaurant chefs examine the daily supply of fish, crustaceans and bivalves, delivery men push handcarts loaden with fruit and vegetables. We definately witnessed the hive of activity and the atmosphere was a riot of colours.

    Address:
    Rialto Markets, San Polo

    Directions:
    From the vaporetto stop at Ponte di Rialto (Rialto Bridge) cross the bridge and work your way to the right and you’ll encounter the Erberia along the water and the Pescheria is further along.

    Opening hours:
    Pescaria (fish market):
    07:30 am – 12:00 pm
    Erbaria (vegetable market):
    07:30 am – 13:00 pm

    Relinde at the fish market. Crabs, alive and kicking!
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    Rialto Markets - The commercial heart of Venice.

    by Jerelis Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The true heart of the Rialto Markets are the vegetables sellers at the Campo de la Pescaria and around the Campo San Giacome di Rialto and the Pescaria (the site of the fish market) between Campo delle Beccarie and the Canal Grande (Grand Canal). During the 11th century the Rialto area became the commercial heart of Venice. Therefore near the Rialto Markets offices connected with trade, banking and sea traffic were established. We can trully say that the Rialto Markets are situated at a magical place.

    One of the beautiful buildings is the Ca’d’Oro (Golden House) whom Canal Grande facade is probably the most magnificent example of domestic Gothic architecture in Venice. The present building of the Pescheria was built in 1917, but fish has been sold in this site for over 600 years. The building running along the Canal Grande and ending at the Campo de le Pescaria is called Fabbriche Nuove, amazing architecture! We simply loved this colourful place full of life.

    Wehenever you haven´t had enough, near the church of San Giacomo di Rialto you´ll find fruit sellers open in the afternoon too.

    Address:
    Rialto Markets, San Polo

    Directions:
    From the vaporetto stop at Ponte di Rialto (Rialto Bridge) cross the bridge and work your way to the right and you’ll encounter the Erberia along the water and the Pescheria is further along.

    Opening hours:
    Pescaria (fish market):
    07:30 am – 12:00 pm
    Erbaria (vegetable market):
    07:30 am – 13:00 pm

    The market seen from the Canal Grande A worker of the market is delivering fresh goods.
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    Rialto Markets - Located in San Polo.

    by Jerelis Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Venice attracts some 20.000.000 tourists a year. Add in a local population of roughly 60.000 and you're talking about a big appetite for groceries. One of the most famous markets where Venetians do buy their own groceries is the Rialto Markets, in the sestiere of San Polo. San Polo is the smallest sestiere, but it's the 2nd most important area of the city in terms of historical importance and attractions for the visitors to Venice. In this district it is still customery to "live over the shop", which means that dwellings and workplaces are often combined. But it's also one of the most confusing parts of the city to navigate through.

    This sestiere runs to the east of the Rio di San Polo to the Ponte di Rialto (Rialto Bridge). San Polo has been the liveliest quarter of Venice since the 11th century when it became the centre for the city's markets. Even up till today it's still home to the Rialto Market, which used to be the centre of trade and commerce for the Venetian Empire. Today, from Tuesday to Saterday in the morning hours there is still a major market here besides the Ponte di Rialto. The fish market offers remarkably good value for money.

    Address:
    Rialto Markets, San Polo

    Directions:
    From the vaporetto stop at Ponte di Rialto (Rialto Bridge) cross the bridge and work your way to the right and you’ll encounter the Erberia along the water and the Pescheria is further along.

    Opening hours:
    Pescaria (fish market):
    07:30 am – 12:00 pm
    Erbaria (vegetable market):
    07:30 am – 13:00 pm

    The daily market near Rialto Bridge. Beautiful and fresh stuff all around.
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    Parking methods on the lagoon's islands

    by Jefie Updated Sep 25, 2010

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    When we reached the island of Burano on our cruise of the lagoon, we saw that there already was a boat parked at the island's small landing dock. However, there was no need to wait: our captain simply placed a wooden board between the two boats and we proceeded to make our way through the other boat to reach the dock! Apparently this method was devised to handle the flow of visitors which, without being heavy, can still be a lot to handle for a small island like Burano.

    Burano's busy landing dock
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    Buy your produce at a floating market

    by Jefie Written Sep 11, 2010

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    I don't know how common these floating markets are - we only saw one during the few days we spent in Venice, and it was located near the Ponte dei Pugni, in the Dorsoduro area. This little boat was filled with fresh fruits and vegetables, and for us it was yet another reminder of how unique life is in Venice. Well, that and the "floating delivery truck" that passed by with a new set of washer and dryer :o)

    Floating market in the Dorsoduro area People buying fruits and vegetables from a boat

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