Campos, Venice

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    My Favorite Campo San Giacomo Di Oro

    by RoscoeGregg Written Apr 6, 2011

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    San Giacomo at night
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    This large and open Campo is my favorite. It changes character throughout the day. It is open with some benches and a few trees. It is surrounded by cafes’ and residences. It is a wonderful place to take a load off and watch Venice drift by.

    I especially like it at night. There is music in one of the cafes’ sometimes and it seems to be part of some Venetian’s evening stroll.

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    Campiello dei Guardian

    by suvanki Updated Apr 28, 2010

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    Campiello dei Guardiani Dorsoduro Venice
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    DORSODURO

    I came upon this interesting Campiello while wandering around Dorsoduro sestiere. It's not far from the Angelo Raffaele church.

    I was quite interested in the various bas reliefs and the terracotta plaques (which were quite unusual), My guide books don't mention this square, and I can't find much out by Googling.

    Any information would be appreciated - in the mean time, I'll keep searching

    UPDATE -I found this exerpt in 'Venice on Foot' by Hugh A Douglas

    "Calle del Guardiani. An inscription on
    the shrine in this calle, dated 1640, seems to
    indicate that the " guardiani," or officers of the
    confraternity of the Holy Sacrament (attached
    to the church of S. Angelo Raffaele), lived here. "

    Presumably some would have lived in this campiello too.

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    Campo Bandiera e Moro

    by suvanki Updated Apr 26, 2009

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    La Residenza and Calle Della Morte
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    CASTELLO
    VAPORETTO - ARSENALE

    Christmas 2008, this was to be my address for 3 nights, as my hotel booking had been altered to La Residenza- the 14th century former Gritti Palace, who's Gothic facade, with its 5 mullioned windows, dominates the north side of the campo. I'm afraid that my room overlooked the street to the right of the hotel and not into the square ( I wasn't complaining though- I'd got a bargain there- my 3 nights together cost less than 1 night if I'd paid the normal price!). Located between Arsenale and San Marco Piazza.

    I was quite curious to find the origins of the narrow street to the left of my hotel Calle della Morte - I'm sure there must have been a gruesome story. I asked the hotel receptionist, but either he didn't know, or couldn't explain.I've since found out that Calle de la Morte (Street of Death) is so called because the Consiglio dei Dieci (Council of Ten) regularly had people executed here if they were considered a problem for the Republic.

    The name of this campo is quite interesting. It is named after 3 Venetian Officers serving in the Austrian Navy, brothers Bandiera and their friend Domenico Moro. The Bandiera family used to live in Palazzo Soderini (No 3611), (which is now a chic town house Bed and Breakfast).
    In 1844, they plotted a revolt in Cosenza or Calabria for Italian unity. Mistakenly, they confided in the English government who betrayed them.They were executed by militia of the Bourbon Kingdom of the Two Sicilies.
    Their effort was considered so heroic, that this humble square was given the honour of being named a Piazza!! This lasted for 60 years. Today, the only square in Venice considered worthy of being named a Piazza is that of San Marco!


    Typical of Venices campos, it is surrounded by buildings of different styles and ages, in the centre is a well head and there is a church. ( pic 3)

    This church is San Giovani (St John) in Bragora, although it has plenty of interest, it appears to get missed by most visitors. Although I saw a tour group arrive at the same time each morning, they only stood in the campo for a while, and didn't enter the church

    It is one of Venices oldest churches, with 8th century foundations. It's also the church where Vivaldi was baptised- a plaque on the outside wall commemorates this event. Vivaldi was born in one of the houses in this campo.

    It's name is the cause of speculation - in the local dialect brago means mud, while bragolare means to fish. Then again agora comes from the greek word for a public square or market place. So it is feasable that there was a fish market here at one time - especially given its location, near to the Basino San Marco and the Quay of Riva degli Schiavoni. Other thought is that it is a reference to the area from where relics of John the Baptist were brought.

    I found it to be an interesting square, and it was mainly very quiet, apart from people passing through it. It might be different in summer though. There are a few benches to sit and rest your feet. There were quite a few plaques around the square, as well as bas reliefs of St George slaying the dragon and under one of the balconies of the red coloured building, 2 old looking pieces. One is of a Lion (unusually it is holding a shield) and below it is - well I'm not entirely sure what creature it is! (pic 2 and 4)

    There is a small cichetteria bar in the campo, where I used to enjoy my evening Aperol Spritz.

    Snacks such as pizza, sandwiches and pastries are available. Also cichetteri such as sardines. Good selection of wines and draught beer.The clientele were all locals. I was quite surprised on Christmas Eve by an elegant couple stopping to wish me "Buone Natale" as they left. Open 0900-2300.

    For fans of Donna Leon and her mysteries based around Commissario Guido Brunetti, the character Avvocato Filipetto (Wilful Behaviour) lives in this campo.

    To reach this square from Arsenale vaporetto stop, turn left, cross the bridge, and take your 3rd alleyway -C/de Dose or from the Pieta take the Calle to its right (C/de Pieta) look for the plaque warning against parents leaving their children here as orphans (see my Things to do tip on The Pieta for more info) turn right into C/dietro la Pieta.

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    Campo Bandiera e Moro or De la Bragora (I&V)

    by Zvrlj Updated Feb 28, 2009

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    Campo Bandiera e Moro or De la Bragora
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    Campo Bandiera e Moro or De la Bragora, dominated by San Giovanni in Bragora church, probably used to be fish market square. It is located by Riva degli Schavioni, very near Santa Maria della Pieta Church, in Castello area.

    The square was named after Italian patriots brothers Attilio and Emilio Bandiera and their companion Domenico Moro. After being betrayed they were executed by firing squad of Bourbon Kingdom of the Two Sicilies in 1844. It is claimed that they cried "Viva l’Italia!", as they fell. The news on martyrdom of the Bandiera brothers and Domenico Moro quickly spread all over Italy and the moral effect of their heroic act was enormous. The remains of the brothers Bandiera and Domenico Moro were brought back to Venice on June 18, 1867, following the liberation of that city after the Austro-Prussian War of 1866 and buried in Basilica di Santi Giovanni e Paolo.

    There are neither cafes nor restaurants on Bandiera e Moro square but it is not peaceful and quiet as some other off the beaten path squares – many locals spend time there, children play football… Never the less, it could be good escape from the usual Venice crowd.

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    Campo dei Mori.

    by Maurizioago Updated Jul 15, 2008

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    Campo dei Mori is a square named after three brothers coming from the Peloponnese. They were silk merchants who came to Venice in 1112 and built a palace in this small square. The palace has three nice statues on its walls.

    Campo dei Mori is located in sestriere Cannareggio. It is near the Ghetto.

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    Campiello Piave (I&V)

    by Zvrlj Updated May 15, 2008

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    Campiello Piave

    Campiello Piave is a tiny square in Cannaregio area, between Madonna dell'Orto church and the vaporetto station of the same name. It is beautiful and calm place with just one bench, several trees and with no access to any canal.

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    Campo San Giacomo dall'Orio (I&V)

    by Zvrlj Updated Feb 11, 2008

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    Campo San Giacomo dell'Orio
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    Campo San Giacomo dall'Orio is beautiful Venetian square with lot of trees. It is in Santa Croce area, just behind San Giacomo dall'Orio church, a-few-minutes-walk far from Fondaco Dei Turchi – Natural History Museum on Canal Grande. It is great place to take a rest in a shadow of a trees.

    There is Campo San Giacomo near Rialto Bridge – it is not the same place.

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    A Maze of Alleys!

    by jemcat Updated Jan 29, 2008

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    Walk everywhere! In between and through the alleys and campos... over the bridges. You will see laundry hanging from building to building and hanging baskets of beautiful flowers everywhere. Unique architecture on every building. It's not that far from the San Marco Square to the Jewish Community. There's a food store in the Jewish Comm. that sells fresh olives, cheeses, breads and good wine. We each bought something for a picnic and took it to the nearest campo and had a grand picnic. It was the most fun!

    Look through several alleys and see many bridges lined up with different structures.

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    Campo San Marziale (I&V)

    by Zvrlj Updated Jan 24, 2008

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    Campo San Marziale, I sitting by the well
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    Campo San Marziale is plain and dreamy Venetian square. There is neither any cafe nor restaurant, neither tree nor even a bench on it, just a well at the center. And cats finding the square to be good for sleeping. Campo San Marziale is the place for those tourists who do not mind sitting on the street and enjoying the Venice. We liked it very much.

    Campo San Marziale is in Cannaregio area, by the church of the same name. It is on the walking path from Strada Nuova to Madonna dell'Orto church.

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    Campiello dei Squelini (I&V)

    by Zvrlj Updated Dec 24, 2007

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    Campiello dei Squelini
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    Campiello dei Squelini is charming little square hidden behind Ca' Foscari, with just two narrow streets leading to it and with no access to the water. It is in Dorsoduro area, east from Campo Santa Margherita and north from Campo San Barnaba. Campiello dei Squelini is kind of students' place with very unique atmosphere. Effort of finding it is well worth.

    There is sort of permanent exhibition of works of Marcello Pirro, Venetian poet and painter on Campiello dei Squelini.

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    Campo San Pietro (I&V)

    by Zvrlj Updated Sep 20, 2007

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    Campo San Pietro

    Campo San Pietro is one of the most peaceful squares in Venice. It is dominated by Church San Pietro di Castello. People spending time there are mostly locals, playing with their children, reading newspapers or books, or simply sitting on the benches and enjoying quietness.

    Campo San Pietro is on the Isola di San Pietro, at the east of Venice, and it can be reached by vaporetto ("San Pietro" station), or walking about 10 minutes north-east from Giardini.

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    Take a break in a campo

    by SJTravel Written Aug 3, 2007

    The walkways are narrow and sometimes very crowded, so there may not be an opportunity for you to take a leisurely walk or take a break. I recommend walking until you find a campo (open area/square) where you can just sit, take a break, and relax. If you are lucky enough to find one of campos with a water fountain, fill up your water bottle. If you are hungry, grab something to eat or even a gelato and enjoy it in the campo. Some campos are more crowded than others, I found the ones that had more locals in it to be more fun. I often stopped, just to sit and enjoy a part of Venice that wasn't too touristy. I enjoyed just sitting and watching people go on about their day. If you are lucky, you may even find a campo that is close to a canal so you can watch gondolas or other boats go by every now and again. You are probably going to do a lot of walking in Venice, and this is just a nice way to rest your feet for a bit, but still enjoy seeing Venice.

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    Life in campo Santa Margherita

    by SPW Written Jan 11, 2007

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    Fruit and vegetable stall
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    Campo San Margherita is the largest in Venice and is well used by local residents, students and a few tourists.
    It has shady trees and benches, many pizzerias and bars, fish and fruit and vegetable stalls, a nearby supermarket and an excellent atmosphere.
    In the morning people go about their shopping, stopping to chat or just to take the air, then in the evening it is filled by people taking their passagiata, stopping for a spritz at one of the many bars, or eating out. In summer, when we were there, most eating is done outdoors under the shade of umbrellas which adds to the atmosphere.

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  • Must people watch

    by newtra Written Oct 28, 2006

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    Gossiping seniors
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    Find yourself a bench and people watch in a campo for an hour or so. It is just so interesting watching tourists struggle with their maps and guidebooks, the Venetians playing with their kids and seniors gossiping with each other. Clothing styles are everything from backpacker cargos and tank tops to the elite in their silk suits, hats and gowns. Very cool. Venice is for everyone for sure.

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    Campo San Giacomo dell'Orio

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 1, 2006

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    Campo di San Giacomo dell'Orio
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    Campo San Giacomo dell'Orio is among the most beautiful in Venezia, and here stands the church of the same name. It is one of the rare sites with trees in the city.
    The church of San Giacomo dell'Orio is perhaps the oldest church in town. Its present structure, however, dates from the twelfth century while the brick bell tower is the thirteenth century. Inside the church you can see valuable paintings by Paolo Veneziano, Paolo Veronese and Lorenzo Lotto.

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