Ghetto, Venice

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  • Ghetto
    by croisbeauty
  • Ghetto
    by croisbeauty
  • Ghetto
    by croisbeauty
  • leics's Profile Photo

    What you might miss in the Ghetto area 1

    by leics Updated Sep 30, 2013

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    Sottoportego Ghetto Nuovo
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    Th Ghetto area really dates from 1516, when the Ghetto Nuovo became the Jewish quarter of Venice (and it is the Venetian ghetto which originally gave the word to the rest of the world).

    At night, the area was sealed off by gates and guarded. In the daytime Jews could wander freely, but had to wear badges and/or caps to show their race.

    You can still see where the gates once were in the Sottoportego Ghetto Nuovo and there are gaps which once housed the hinges.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Chiesa di San Maurizio

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 12, 2011

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    San Maurizio
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    The Church of San Maurizio is situated in the eponymous campo. It have been founded in the 16th century and reconstructed in 1806. The front facade is in Neoclassical style adorned with the bassreliefs in its timpan and two bassreliefs on each side above the lunotta.
    In the 18th century the church was seat of the attelier of the famous sculptor Antonio Canova.

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Jewish Synagogues

    by sandysmith Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Star of David

    As you explore the Ghetto area you may be asked if you want to join a tour of the synagogues and if you want to see them inside then go as this is the only way (apart from a service) of seeing the inside of them.
    Tours in English tend to begin half past the hour, and lasts approximately forty minutes.

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    Il Ghetto

    by oriettaIT Updated Feb 11, 2011

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    Campo del ghetto nuovo
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    Venice old Ghetto is one of my favourite stroll destination. I love to get lost in its small streets and I enjoy to hang out in Campo del Ghetto Nuovo and just watch the people. There are some Jewish restaurants there and, some shops that sell antiques and old books and of course Synagogue. It is really a different Venice and never crowded as it is far from the usual touristic route.

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    Campo del Ghetto Nuovo

    by Tijavi Updated Dec 5, 2008

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    Campo dell Ghetto Nuovo
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    The history of Venice is not all about romantic canals and evocative gothic and renaissance art; it has its not so pleasant moments.

    The former Jewish quarters centered around Campo del Ghetto Nuovo is regarded as the world's first ghetto - in the original sense of the word (not in its present, crime-and-grime associated context). This is where the city's Jews were relocated and locked up at night by the dominant Christian population and where they lived under tight rules, although they were allowed to practice their religion. This went on from the late 1500s to until the late 1700s when the Venetian republic fell, after which the Jews were given their freedom to live in other places in the islands.

    Today, the campo is surrounded by Museum Ebraico (a museum devoted to Jewish religious artifacts), and four synagogues - Schola Canton, Schola Italiana, Schola Levantina, and Schola Spagnola.

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    The Last Train

    by leics Written May 1, 2008

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    The Last Train

    There is a memorial to the 200 Venetian Jews who lost their lives in the Holocaust in the campo; a series of bronze plaques, and a poem by Andre Tranc.

    Arbit Blatas, the artist, also created the moving bronze memorial on the north side of the campo. Entitled 'The Last Train', it lists the names and ages of all those who suffered.

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    What you might miss in the Ghetto area 4

    by leics Updated May 1, 2008

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    Laws and regulations.

    Medieval Venetian Jews wre subject to a number of laws and restrictions.

    Apart from being locked in at night (doctors were the only people allowed to leave the Ghetto at night), they were forbidden to take part in some trades, but encouraged in others (money-lending in particular).

    It didn't maytter if they converted to Christianity:the law remained the same.

    You can see a stone inscribed with the laws and regulations concerning what Jews and converts may or may not do (and the associated penalties) part-way down Calle di Ghetto Vecchio.

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    What you might miss in the Ghetto area 3

    by leics Written May 1, 2008

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    Banco Rosso

    In Medieval times (and earlier) Jews lent money, Christians did not. That is, historically, one of the main reasons for their continued persecution in so many countries. So much easier to organise persecution than pay one's debts........

    If you look very carefully around the Campo, you can still see the legend 'Banco Rosso' over the lintel of number 2911.

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    What you might miss in the Ghetto area 2

    by leics Updated May 1, 2008

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    A different style of architecture...

    There were many Jews in Medieval Venice, so the Ghetto became overcrowded. Even when new areas were opened up (the Ghetto Vecchio in 1541, the Ghetto Nuovomisso in 1633) conditions were cramped.

    Jews were not allowed to own property in the ghetto, so landlords created buildings with low ceilings and many floors (7 is most usual). The ghetto buildings were not allowed to be more than a third higher than others in the city. The architectural style in some parts of the Ghetto is, in consequence, quite different to the rest of Venice.

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  • Jerelis's Profile Photo

    Canneregio - Strada Nuova.

    by Jerelis Updated Jan 13, 2007

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    Chiesa San Leonardo at a very rainy morning.

    On our way back to the Grand Canal we passed-by Tintoretto's house, which houses work by this popular artist. We also visited his local parish church, the Madonna dell'Orta. The name of the church originates from a weeping statue found in a nearby garden. After that we walked our way a bit back to the station to admire Campo Ghetto Nuovo and its Sinagoga.

    Finally we made it to Strada Nuova, which is one of Venice's major town-planning schemes, linking the city centre around Rialto with the railway station. Our conclusion about Cannaregio is that on this sestiere, special attention must be paid to the number of palaces, dating from the Byzantine period to the 18th century, that are to be found together with large 16th century quater of the Ghetto, and the churches and monasteries, which are numerous in this area too.

    Address:
    Sestiere of Cannaregio.

    Directions:
    North western of Piazza San Marco – a 12 minute walk.

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  • Jerelis's Profile Photo

    Canneregio - Adjencted to the Grand Canal

    by Jerelis Updated Jan 13, 2007

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    The impressive Chiesa di San Giovanni Crisostomo.

    The areas adjencted to the Grand Canal were built up next. The urban sprawl proceeded northwards, on what were, untill then, remote islands. With the construction of the railway and road bridge to the mainland in the 19th century, the mainly residential and religious nature of the sestiere changed. But it contains treasures in its own right.

    We visited Canneregio on our last day in Venice. We started our hike at Stazione Ferroviaria Santa Lucia and walked our way into the sestiere via Rio Terra Lista di Spagna. There are numerous local markets located throughout this area serving the Venetians who still live here, and providing lively and colourful scenes for us. We learned that Canneregio was the last part of the historic center of Venice to be developed, its canal are remarkably straight and well organized. We walked all the way to Fondamenta Nuova and enjoyed the sweeping views of the northern lagoon and the Island of San Michele and Murano.

    Address:
    Sestiere of Cannaregio.

    Directions:
    North western of Piazza San Marco – a 12 minute walk.

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  • Jerelis's Profile Photo

    Cannaregio - The second largest sestiere.

    by Jerelis Updated Jan 13, 2007

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    Beautiful houses at Rio Terra Lista di Spagna.

    Cannaregio is Venice's second largest sestiere, stretching across the north west of the city from the station almost to the Rialto Bridge. It's one of the few parts of the city where Venetians still live in great numbers. Its numerous restaurants offer some of the best cuisine available in Venice at very reasonable prices. Especially in and around the Ghetto area and the Foundamenta della Misericorda where we found a good selection of both regional and ethnic restaurants.

    Canneregio was settled well before AD 1900, when the first dwellings were built on the islands of San Giovanni Crisostome and Santi Apostoli, close to Rialto.

    Address:
    Sestiere of Cannaregio.

    Directions:
    North western of Piazza San Marco – a 12 minute walk.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Ghetto

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 1, 2006

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    The synagogues in Venezia are among the oldest in Europe. Here you can see the Schola Canton, the Levantine, German and Spanish synagogues, the last of which was restructured by Galdassare Longhena. There is also a nursery school, a baker's producting unleavened bread, the Museum of Jewish Art and Culture and a Rabbi school where many Jewish students, especially from USA, come to study the Talmud.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Ghetto - memorial

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 1, 2006

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    Memerial to 200 Venetian Jews killed during holoca
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    In 1938, right before the Big War, there were 1.471 Jews living in the Ghetto, whereas in the 17th century there had been more than five thousand. Today only two or three Jewish families have survived keeping up the ancient tradition and preserving their identity.
    Just think of the Holocaust, remembered in the Campo del Ghetto Nuovo in a bas relief by Arbit Blatas, but also of the racist campaigns of the early twentieth century in the city. The recist campaigns excluded the Jews from public office and from using the beaches at Lido. On the door of the famous Harry's bar a sign was hung "No dogs and no jews allowed."

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    Wartime Past

    by Nixter01 Written Feb 12, 2006

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    GHETTO sign
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    I have always wanted to visit the 'GHETTO' as I find these kind of places very interesting and educational along with feelings of sadness of what they went through, so with my pop up map we managed to visit on my last day. I was suprised along with somewhat disappointment that it was just like the rest of venice, in fact if you did'nt know you were there you would not know any different. There is a museum there, but unfortunately it was closed on the day we went, but open all other times.
    It is also suprising how quickly you reach the area, it looks miles away on the map, but remember it is only a small island and you are there quicker than you know it.
    There are several plaques on the street walls in Jewish, although some maybe german, can anyone let me know ? I can only assume its Jewish.

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