Campi, Calli and Canali, Venice

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  • Things take on charm when the lights come on
    Things take on charm when the lights...
    by RoscoeGregg
  • Listening to bells in the twilight is wonderful
    Listening to bells in the twilight is...
    by RoscoeGregg
  • Campo San Bartolomeo Christmas 2009
    Campo San Bartolomeo Christmas 2009
    by suvanki
  • jorgec25's Profile Photo

    The true Venice

    by jorgec25 Written Jul 6, 2009

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    Venice
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    Visit the calles and campos in Venice. You can get a sense of how the locals live, and you see a completely different Venice.

    Don’t be afraid to get lost, because it’s almost impossible that you don’t. But you always get back on track :)

    Take a map with you and go discover. Some of the campos (squares) have cheerful street markets and cafes.

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    Campo San Polo

    by suvanki Updated Dec 9, 2007

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    Campo San Polo Venice
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    SAN POLO and SANTA CROCE

    This rectangular Campo was a pleasant place to sit and enjoy a few minutes of Christmas Days sunshine! It is the second largest Square in Venice (after Piazza San Marco)

    A few locals were enjoying themselves too, some small boys were playing football, a man was mending a bicycle for some young boys; who were playing on skateboards, while a young girl was walking round with a huge white fluffy cat! (see my other pic) Apparently a plaque on the apse of the church dated 1611 forbids all games or any selling of merchandise - the penalty being prison, galley service or exile!!!

    This Campo becomes quite lively in the warmer months, when it becomes an open air cinema. This can seat 2,000, and your 5 euro admission enables viewings of Italian dubbed films.

    Traditionally, the square has hosted festivals, markets, fairs, masquarades, Grand Balls, and bull baiting! It was also the place where Lorenzino de' Medici was assassinated in 1548 (he'd killed his cousin Alessandro - The Duke of Florence, and fled to Venice. 2 assassins in the service of Cosimo de' Medici fatally stabbed Lorenzino)

    Surrounding the cobbled centre, are a few buildings of interest, besides the church of San Polo, there are some palaces. The red building - Pallazzo Soranzo, is the institute of Chinese Language and Literature, but was originally the home of a Venetian nobleman, who adopted one of the cities most famous characters- Casanova as his son!
    Next to this is the Pallazzo Tiepolo. In the NW corner is Palazzo Corner Mocenigo, where Frederick Rolfe lived

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    From the Garnd canal by Vaporetto

    by mallyak Written Sep 2, 2008

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    This water bus is a local vaporetto on Route No. 1, which zigzags across the Grand Canal as it makes its way from the Piazzale Roma and the railway station to the Piazza San Marco. After San Marco, it stops several more times before turning around at Venice's resort island, the Lido.

    The No. 1 boat is slow, and it can be crowded during peak season or at rush hour. If you plan to use this route for sightseeing, board the boat at the end of the line (Piazzale Roma or Lido) and grab a seat in the bow, where standing isn't permitted and you'll have uninterrupted sightlines.

    The Grand Canal (Italian: Canal Grande, Venetian: Cana³asso) is the most important canal in Venice, Italy. It forms one of the major water-traffic corridors in the city. Public transport is provided by water buses and private water taxis, but many tourists visit it by gondola.

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    Campo San Trovaso

    by Mahieu Written Aug 1, 2004

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    Gondolas all over Venice of course. And if you're really interested in them, you can have a look at Campo San Trovaso. This is the square where they still repair gondolas. Some wooden houses and a wooden square, nothing special, but I loved this cosy little square and when walking on the Zattere, I saw some person busy repairing the famous gondolas.

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    What to do when it rains....

    by timtrina Written Sep 12, 2004

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    Tim and Imogen in San Marco Square

    Just grab an umbrella and walk the streets! The afternoon we arrived the weather was lovely, but got dark very quickly (and if you've read the intro page, you'll know that we searched for our hotel for 3 1/2 hours in the dark). Too tired to go out sightseeing that night, we decided to wait until the morning. The next day we were greeted with grey clouds and lots of rain. That combined with high water, made visiting the main attractions (San Marco Basillica, etc), less than enjoyable. We simply walked to the east of San Marco square with our umbrellas and headed off to find what other treasures were waiting for us. Don't ever let the bad weather get you down in Venice - it's one of those places that still holds so much charm in the pelting rain. I've even dedicated an entire travelogue for photos of this day, as we found some of the most characteristic and stunning places in these backstreets....

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    Campo Santa Maria Formosa

    by clairegeordio Written Jul 17, 2004

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    This square is in the castello area and we had to pass through it every day from our hotel to get to the main part of Venice. One bridge off the square takes you in the direction of St Mark's Square and the other to the Rialto Bridge. There is a church in the square and several outdoor cafes which were always popular.

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    Feeding the Pigeons at San Marco

    by timtrina Written Sep 12, 2004

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    Imogen feeding the pigeons

    I think almost every tourist does this when visiting Venezia - buy a packet of bird food, and throw it out to the pigeons eagerly awaiting it! Be careful though - they will flock to you from near and far - stand on your arms, shoulders and head. Travelogue follows showing just what can happen, when our daughter feed them for the first time (yes - we ended up having to feed them everyday during our stay).

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  • RoscoeGregg's Profile Photo

    Visit A Place You Like At A Different Time Of Day

    by RoscoeGregg Updated Sep 13, 2009

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    The Light On San Marco Changing
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    I have found that in Venice if I liked a particular place at one time of the day like morning, it was just as great in the evening or at night and sometimes even better.

    Often times the spot had a completely different personality.

    So my tip is that if you found a campo, bridge or canal particularly touching revisit at another time of the day.

    I found dusk and night to be particularly pleasant.

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  • timtrina's Profile Photo

    Venice by night...

    by timtrina Written Sep 13, 2004

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    You simply must walk the streets / calles of Venice at night - it is breathtakingly beautiful. Do be careful though not to go too far away from the main touristy spots (such as north of San Marco Piazza) - especially in the backstreets, as we did feel quite scared a couple of times - turning the corner to find someone waiting there. Maybe it was because we were travelling with our daughter who was 5 years old at the time, that we were ok? I have a few beautiful photos - this is one of them...

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    Campiello Santa Maria Nova.

    by breughel Written Jul 30, 2010

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    Campiello Santa Maria Nova.
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    After browsing here through 185 reviews I saw that this Campiello (small Campo) had not been commented.
    What a pleasure to finally write something about Venice that is not redundant on VT!
    Better is the fact that I found info about the palace with that strange sculpture in a niche on the front.
    This is the Palazzo Bembo-Boldù and the sculpture is a wild hairy god "Chronos" master of time, or Saturn wearing a sun disk.

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    Buildings along the Grand Canal

    by mallyak Written Sep 2, 2008

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    The Grand Canal banks are lined with Amongst the many are the Palazzi Barbaro, Ca' Rezzonico, Ca' d'Oro, Palazzo Dario, Ca' Foscari, Palazzo Barbarigo and to Palazzo Venier dei Leoni, housing the Peggy Guggenheim Collection. The churches along the canal include the basilica of Santa Maria della Salute. Centuries-old tradition such as the Historical Regatta are perpetuated every year along the Canal.

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    Even If You're Not Wearing Boots...

    by Pink_Pash Updated Apr 21, 2004

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    It's the view, not the gondolieri.

    Alright then, what to do when in Venice. Walk. It's as simple as that. If there's one city that I love getting lost in, it's Venice. Walking is a great way to travel the campos, calles, and the many canals and really get lost in the hauntingly beautiful aura that this city posseses.

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    Campo di Santi Apostoli

    by suvanki Updated Mar 23, 2008

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    Campo dei Santi Apostoli Cannaregio Venice
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    CANNAREGIO

    This bustling campo was a place I passed through many times, as it was near my hotel - Locanda Nova.

    I was quite pleased to recognise it from my previous vist, when I had been amused by 3 shops located together - A funeral parlour, Dog Shop and Pizzeria/ Kebab cafe - Was there a connection?

    This campo was one of the first of the Rialtos islets to be colonized. Venice originated from this area, and expanded outwards, as inhabitants from Torcello escaped the malaria infested island. The Church of Santi Apostoli began construction around this time. (1000 AD), and its commercial centre began.

    Cannaregios' name may have derived from the Italian word canne meaning canes or reeds, as these grew on the marshy mud flats. Although there is also thought that it originated from the Canal Regio or Royal Canal, the main gateway to the city from the mainland prior to the railway being constructed.

    During the daytime, there were a few market stalls, (some selling Christmas goods) and souvenir stands. This is a busy thoroughfare from the Rialto Bridge to San Lucia Station.

    Opposite the church, above the bridge crossing the canal - (Rio dei San Apostoli) is a popular hotel - The Hotel Antico Doge. This was originally the Pallazo Falier- home to the 55th Doge of Venice - Marin Falier, who at the age of 76, unsuccessfully attempted to overthrow the senate. He was beheaded, and declared 'Damnatic Menoriae'

    An interesting article about the Doge, his life and death can be viewed on the hotels website Click

    To be continued...

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    Campo Dei Mori - Cannaregio

    by suvanki Updated Jan 14, 2008

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    1 of the Mori Brothers - Cannaregio Venice
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    CANNAREGIO

    This campo is surrounded by residential properties, but it has a few interesting sights in it and nearby.
    Firstly, the 4 comic statues that face out from the building on the corner near the bridge. These are believed to be Rioba, Sandi and Afani Mastelli - 3 brothers from the Peloponnese (The Morea), who took refuge in Venice in 1112. Originally silk merchants, they built the nearby Palazzo Mastelli - on Fondamente Gasparo Contarini, recognised by its camel bas relief plaque. It's not certain whether they earned their nickname Dei Mori - The Moors, due to their place of birth, or from their trading connections with The East. The 4th statue on the corner of the building is Sior Antonio Rioba - ( identifiable with a metal nose - this was added in the 19th century) Rioba was the focus for malicious fun and satire

    2 of the brothers statues face into the campo, and 1 faces onto Fondamente dei Mori - it stands on an old roman altar on the facade of number 3399 Fondamenti dei Mori. Here Jacopo Robusti - better known as the artist Tintoretto, lived from 1574 until his death in 1594. A plaque of Tintoretto can be seen on the wall. (click onto my other pics to see)

    In the campo is also a plaque to the 14 victims of an Austrian zeppelin attack in 1917.

    By the Mori is a kiosk, that serves cold drinks- there are a few seats under parasols.

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    Campo Santo Stefano

    by suvanki Updated May 6, 2009

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    SAN MARCO

    This is Venice's 2nd most important square. At the north end sits its church - Santo Stefano, which has some of Tintorettos most famous works, and is also an attractive piece of architecture. (please see my next tip.)

    From its southern end, you walk directly to the Accademia Bridge that links this sestieri of San Marco, with Dorsoduro (and the Art gallery that gives its name to the bridge, and Vaporetto station)

    If you head eastwards out of the campo, by Calle de Spezier you'll arrive in Piazza San Marco (follow the yellow signs),
    and Northwards (past Chiesa Santo Stefano) takes you to the Rialto (again follow the signs)

    Before you head off in one of these directions, take time to look around the Campo, and enjoy a drink or something to eat at one of the many cafes. For Ice cream fans - of all ages- Gelateria Paolin is noted as being among the best by Venetians. I'm afraid that I didn't get to find out.

    In the 18th Century, Campo Santo Stefano was one of Venices main bull fighting arenas. However, it came to an abrupt end in 1802, when a seating stand collapsed, causing the deaths of many spectators. Carnivals and markets continued and still do - From November to December 23rd an annual Christmas market is held here. 2008 was its 10th anniversary -Please see my previous tip.

    This spacious campo is also known as Campo Francesco Morosini, named after the Doge who lived here in the 17th century. (his tomb is in Santo Stefano Church- look for the bronze plaque on the floor cordoned off by rope). He resided at No 2802.

    Morosini was the last doge to serve as the Republic's military commander, from 1688 -94)
    His main claim to fame, being that he blew up the Parthenon in Athens- aided by the Turkish gunpowder stored there! He also plundered the stone lions from this site- rehousing them in front of the gate of the Arsenale

    In the centre of the square is a statue of Nicolo Tommaseo (1802 -74), who was a scholar from Dalmatia. His philosophical theories were valuable during the Italian movement of Unification - The Risorgimento.

    Behind the statue is the entrance to Puntolaguna - No 2949. This is a state- of- the- art, multi media information centre, run by Venice's water authority (Magistrato alle Acquae).

    This is the place to visit to find out all about the matters concerning Venice and ways planned to safeguard the city and lagoon. Info on The MoSE project, eco systems, itineraries for visiting the lagoon etc. As well as informed staff to consult, there are workstations with, CD-Rom, internet sites and Video libraries.
    Apparently it's a good place to take children. There are workshops run by the staff (sometimes in english) aimed at children. (though it's closed July-August!)

    Free admission. Open Mon-Fri 14.30 -17.30 www.salve.it Tel 0415293582

    The square is surrounded by a few Pallazzos. The Veneto Institute of Science, Letters and Art is at the former Palazzo Loredan, and the high iron fenced Palazzo Francheti, is one of the few Grand Canal palaces with a garden. Off the Campo is the smaller Campiello Pisani -If you listen near the Palazzo Pisani , you might hear music being played as this is the Conservatory of music.

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