Castello District - Sestiere Castello, Venice

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  • Castello District - Sestiere Castello
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    Scuola Grande di San Marco
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  • Castello District - Sestiere Castello
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    Veneziano Sunday along the southern Rivas

    by Trekki Updated Jun 27, 2015

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    From the southern end of Garibaldi Park it is only a short walk to the rive, Venice’s large quays at the bacino di San Marco. Walking toward the west will lead to Ponte dei Sospiri, the Bridge of Sighs, and Piazza San Marco.

    Next to the bridge at the end of the park stands an interesting monument, a rostral column. It has clear naval signs and decoration so must have been built to celebrate a maritime victory. But according to what I read it was made not for Venice but by the Austrian Navy end of 19th century for the archduke Ferdinand Maximilian (later known as Maximilian I of Mexico). It was brought to Venice early 20th century. However I didn’t find anything more about it, especially why it was brought to Venice.

    From there the first riva is Riva dei Siette Martiri, named after the seven martyrs the Nazi terrorists murdered in Venice during WW II, following the death of a Nazi seamen who fell into the water after having drunk too much. But .. according to the sick Nazi ideology this could not have happened so scapegoats were needed. As horrible as the story behind the name of this quay is, as peaceful it is today, not yet crowded with visitors. It is was a nice atmosphere on that Sunday afternoon in May 2007, with people strolling along the street, some had thrown out their bait to catch fish for dinner. From there the views across the bacino are fabulous. I loved the colours the light had that afternoon and especially the good photos I could take of Isola di San Giorgio with the typical Venetian street lamps in the foreground.

    The houses along the riva are beautiful too, not of special architecture but photogenic. Very interesting are the house complexes of “Marinaressa”, with large entrance arches. These were once built for the former sailors, so something like a retiring home for them.

    Vaporetto stop: Giardini (almost all lines stop here):
    Venice vaporetto map
    Venice vaporetto schedule

    Location of (4) Via Garibaldi, (5) Garibaldi statue, (6) Garibaldi Park, (7) Rive on Bing Maps.

    © Ingrid D., June 2015 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.).

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    Garibaldi park – now even more relaxing

    by Trekki Updated Jun 27, 2015

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    South of Garibaldi’s monument is a beautiful park which, according to what I read, was initiated by Napoleon as a green space for recovery for the locals, tearing down many churches and convents which once stood here. At the end the park continues to the southeast into the park where today the stalls and art and pavilions of Biennale are located. However, I didn’t continue to Biennale Park but just stayed in the Garibaldi Park along the little street Viale Garibaldi. It was again a wonderful relaxed and serene atmosphere, especially with the many benches and the tall trees which provided shade on that warm Sunday afternoon. The park almost looked like a landscape garden, especially with this charming deteriorating glass house at the end of the park.

    But things change and while this glass house was deteriorating in 2007, it was renovated in the meantime (now that I am updating in June 2015). I have read that it was built end of 19th century when the people wanted more and more exotic plants to decorate their homes and gardens. So it was a former palm tree house, which explains the height. Today it is called “Serra dei Giardini”, created in 2010 by the cooperative Nonsoloverde which offers any kind of recreation, from selling plants to yoga lessons, many activities for children and a café with biological products and natural juices.
    This alone is a reason for me to come back to Venice, because it sounds and looks like exactly my thing!
    Their website is good, in English with all the activities and ideas listed:
    Serra Dei Giardini

    Vaporetto stop: Giardini (almost all lines stop here):
    Venice vaporetto map
    Venice vaporetto schedule

    Location of (4) Via Garibaldi, (5) Garibaldi statue, (6) Garibaldi Park, (7) Rive on Bing Maps.

    © Ingrid D., June 2015 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.).

    The glasshouse has been restored in the meantime The glasshouse has been restored in the meantime

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    Garibaldi and the turtles

    by Trekki Updated Jun 27, 2015

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    Just at the northern entrance of Garibaldi Park is a very nice statue or monument to Giuseppe Garibaldi, Italy’s hero of the Risorgimento (unification of Italy) in 19th century. He is portrayed as the winner, standing on a piece of rock symbolising a mountain top. The rock is over and over covered with moss and plants are nicely arranged. What I found so sweet were the cute looking little turtles in the pond beneath the monument. The monument was created end of 19th century, by Augusto Benvenuti.

    Vaporetto stop: Giardini (almost all lines stop here):
    Venice vaporetto map
    Venice vaporetto schedule

    Location of (4) Via Garibaldi, (5) Garibaldi statue, (6) Garibaldi Park, (7) Rive on Bing Maps.

    © Ingrid D., June 2015 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.).

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    Via Garibaldi – the "real" Venice :-)

    by Trekki Updated Jun 27, 2015

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    Coming back from Isola San Pietro I spent a little more time on this beautiful Fondamenta Sant’Anna, before it merges with Via Garibaldi. The houses looked different than in Venice’s centre, they are often more narrow and taller. Maybe they are still somehow a result of having to provide space and room for many workers “outside” the noble core of Venice? The atmosphere here was to my liking: almost only locals, chatting, strolling, and pushing kids’ baby buggies, like in any part of the small-town Italy I love so much. Venice seemed far away.

    When I arrived at the point where Rio della Tana merges into Rio di Sant’Anna I smiled when I saw the view (my main photo) and thought that nowhere else laundry dries more picturesque in the sun than in Italy. Nearby is another of the boats where fresh produces coming from mostly Sant’Erasmo, Venice’s farm island, are being sold. Once again I wished I would have stayed closer by one of these boats, but bringing salads and tomatoes back to my apartment through the heat of this Sunday wasn’t a good idea.

    Continuing my walk I arrived on Via Garibaldi, which, according to what I read, is a rather “new” street: the former Rio di Castello was silted up too much to be cleaned and so it was filled up and Via Garibaldi resulted in 19th century. Maybe this might be the reason why this street is rather wide, at least it is the widest street I saw in Venice. It is lined by small cafés and bars, people sit outside in nice weather and the world is just peaceful.
    Hence my title: this felt like the “real” Venice, the daily Venice where less visitors and more locals are and do about their daily things.

    From Via Garibaldi a large alley turns south, this is Garibaldi Park.

    Vaporetto stop: Giardini (almost all lines stop here):
    Venice vaporetto map
    Venice vaporetto schedule

    Location of (4) Via Garibaldi, (5) Garibaldi statue, (6) Garibaldi Park, (7) Rive on Bing Maps.

    © Ingrid D., June 2015 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.).

    Isn't this just beautiful? Fondamenta Sant'Anna Fondamenta Sant'Anna

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    Dawdling an afternoon on San Pietro

    by Trekki Updated Jun 27, 2015

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    After having visited Chiesa San Pietro I didn’t want to go back to the city centre immediately but was in relaxed mood, so I sat on a bench and watched the world around me. The space in front of the church is large, shady with many trees and benches. Just around the corner of the church was a house, maybe a place where nuns lived or a parish house (that’s what Bing/Google maps say) and the ladies were busy walking between church and the house. Couples were sitting in the grass, reading, talking, and enjoying the day. I found this atmosphere here very very relaxing. Given the small size of the island there are not many restaurants or bars, albeit since some time there is a small bar offering caffè, Spritz and snacks. And it is also well worth walking around between the local’s houses, there are some very nice photogenic spots such as this relief at a house wall showing the patriarch presenting a fish to Baby Jesus. Of course lovers of maritime atmosphere will also enjoy this island because it is still a fishermen’s island and the guys are sitting at the docks reparing nets or boats.

    Vaporetto stop: San Pietro di Castello (lines 4.1./4.2. and 5.1./5.2.)
    Venice vaporetto map
    Venice vaporetto schedule

    Location of (1) bridge to Isola San Pietro, (2) Chiesa San Pietro, (3) Isola San Pietro on Bing Maps.

    © Ingrid D., June 2015 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.).

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    S. Pietro de Castello – bishop's seat once

    by Trekki Updated Jun 26, 2015

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    Isola San Pietro or Isola Olivolo, as it was called centuries ago was one of the very first islands which were inhabited in Venice’s very early days. It was also an important bishop seat until mid 1807.

    On the website Churches of Venice it is written that the earliest church dates back to 650, later rebuilt and extended. There it is also mentioned that Palladio was asked to work on the exterior but at the end he died before the work was completed in early 17th century. But this was obviously based upon Palladio’s plans because the facade looks like “Palladio”. Inside I found it rather plain and white except the altar section. Here a beautiful painting highlights the ceiling and an altarpiece by Baldassare Longhena. A few metres away stand this campanile and despite I knew that it must have been crooked since a long time I was slightly nervous when I walked around it. The bell tower was built early too but collapsed various times after a fire and lightning. The one we see today is from 17th century.

    The church is open daily from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. It once belonged to the Chorus Pass which is no longer available but is replaced with the churches section of Venezia Unica Pass. But sadly it is no where mentioned how much admission fee is when one does not have this church pass.
    Photography was not allowed in May 2007 when I was inside. I assume this is still the case today.

    Vaporetto stop: San Pietro di Castello (lines 4.1./4.2. and 5.1./5.2.)
    Venice vaporetto map
    Venice vaporetto schedule

    Location of (1) bridge to Isola San Pietro, (2) Chiesa San Pietro, (3) Isola San Pietro on Bing Maps.

    © Ingrid D., June 2015 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.).

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    Isola San Pietro – utmost serenity :-))

    by Trekki Updated Jun 26, 2015

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    Isola San Pietro and Isola Santa Elena are the easternmost islands of Venice and belong to Castello district. With a beautiful church of historical importance I highly recommend walking further east and spending some time on San Pietro.

    From the fish scale sign at Fondamenta della Tana I walked east, on the little fondamenta next to Rio Sant’Anna until I arrived at this beautiful wooden bridge, one of the two connecting Isola San Pietro with Castello. I think it is little boatyards I saw there, very photogenic. And as soon as I crossed the bridge I felt like being on another planet. It was so quiet here, no busy atmosphere, almost if I would be not in Venice but in a little Italian fishermen village. But as innocent as the island looks today in Venice’s early days it was one of the first settlements and a bishop seat for quite a while. There was even a fortress on the island in 7th century; very likely Castello district has its name from it.
    Once on the island it was only a few more minutes to Chiesa die San Pietro and the very crooked campanile.

    Vaporetto stop: San Pietro di Castello (lines 4.1./4.2. and 5.1./5.2.)
    Venice vaporetto map
    Venice vaporetto schedule

    Location of (1) bridge to Isola San Pietro, (2) Chiesa San Pietro, (3) Isola San Pietro on Bing Maps.

    © Ingrid D., June 2015 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.).

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    Backstreet Castello, is your fish big enough

    by Trekki Updated Jun 26, 2015

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    When I saw Christine(j)’s review about ancient measurements in Heidelberg, precisely is your pretzel big enough I smiled and realised how many of these old measurements had been used in the old ages. And so in Venice too.

    I had read that there is a “fish scale” measurement near Arsenale and Museo Storico Navale. And of course I had to find it! It is located in the little street behind the museum, called Fondamenta Rio della Tana. Tana means hole or even rat hole and might have specified the secret and closed of Arsenale complex as it was seen by the locals who didn’t work there. This street is interesting because even more it shows how shut off the whole complex was, very impressing. And while I was taking in this serene atmosphere on a lazy Sunday afternoon I found the sign at a house wall almost at the end of this little street, the fish measurements. They were meant as a scale to assure that no one who bought fish could be betrayed: it shows the minimal length for the various fish from the lagoon and the sea. It was here at Rio della Tana where the fishermen sold their catch of the day in Venice’s old days.

    Other old measurement standards are in Dornoch (Scotland), cloth size (by Joan, @scotishvisitor), Speyer (Germany), general measuring device and in Norcia, measuring grain.

    Vaporetto stop: Arsenale (almost all lines stop here):
    Venice vaporetto map
    Venice vaporetto schedule

    Location of (2) Arsenale, (5) Museo Storico Navale, (6) Backstreet Castello and the fish scale on Bing Maps.

    © Ingrid D., July 2007 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.). Update June 2015: wording.

    Is your fish big enough? Campo della Tana and Cordiere (left) Walls of Cordiere at Fondamenta della Tana Walls of Cordiere at Fondamenta della Tana Walls of Cordiere at Fondamenta della Tana
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    Chiesa S. Francesco della Vigna & vineyards

    by Trekki Updated Jun 23, 2015

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    I continued my walks through Venice’s north eastern following the streets east of Basilica Santi Giovanni e Paolo, through very charming tiny little streets where I must have been the only visitor on that day. I saw a campanile which drew my attention but I knew it could not be *the* Campanile. This is how I eventually arrived in front of the church San Francesco della Vigna. From the outside it looked more like a Greek temple and later I read that it was Palladio’s first work in Venice.

    Legends say that San Marco (St. Mark the Evangelist, Venezia’s patron saint) once arrived here during a stormy night. An angel appeared and greeted him with the words Pax tibi Marce Evangelista meus (peace with you, oh Mark, my Evangelist). These words we know from the many San Marco lion sculptures: they are chiselled into the book he holds in his paws.

    The church is named after a vineyard (vigna = vineyard) and, if we look at the satellite images, it might still be there, north of the church.

    When I was there the church was closed but I have read that it is filled with rich artwork: paintings by Veronese, a madonna by Giovanni Bellini and relief work by Pietro Lombardo. Sadly I forgot to note down the opening hours to come back. All I can say is that the church is not included in the former Chorus Pass (now Venezia Unica Pass, churches). The website Churches of Venice describes San Francesco della Vigna quite good and says the opening hours would be 8 a.m. to 12:30 and 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

    Also try to visit the cloister to the north of the church. From the photos in the website it must be a very peaceful place.

    But the most ... well I can say ecstasising thing happened when I turned around the corner at the church’s entrance and saw .... the questura where Donna Leon’s Commissario Brunetti works in the TV series. This building complex is so characteristic, I saw it so often when I watched the series and I stood first speechless and then laughing for many many minutes. Luckily no one came by, I might had been locked elsewhere. But this, Brunetti, is also a story for elsewhere, for my off path section to be precise.

    Vaporetto stop: Celestia (one stop east of Ospedale), lines 4.1./4.2. and 5.1./5.2.:
    Venice vaporetto map
    Venice vaporetto schedule

    Location of Chiesa San Francesco della Vigna on Bing Maps.

    © Ingrid D., July 2007 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.). Update June 2015: wording.

    San Francesco della Vigna, facade detail San Francesco della Vigna, facade detail San Francesco della Vigna, the campo The colonnades next to the church Colonnades and
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    Amazing façade of Scuola di San Marco

    by Trekki Updated Jun 23, 2015

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    Brotherhoods or scuole played a major role in Venezia’s past. They often had the most marvellous buildings and a lot of money. One of these scuole is or better was Scuola Grande di San Marco, the building is still there with a marvellous southern façade. Those of you who love art and especially paintings might recognise it from Canaletto’s painting SS Giovanni e Paolo and the Scuola di San Marco, dated 1725 and now on exhibit in Dresden’s Gallery of Old Masters. If I look at photos of this painting today it is fascinating how realistic it is. It could have been a photo of today, but of course, the clothes are different. But with the painting’s perspective the beautiful façade cannot be properly seen. It reminded me of Chiesa Chiesa di Santa Maria dei Miracoli and indeed it is the same architect, Pietro Lombardi, who started the work. It was finished however by Mauro Coducci in 1500. In addition to these polychrome porphyry roundels the most intriguing aspect is the symmetrical or even symmetrical-asymmetrical facade of the entrance portal and especially the parts left and right. If you stand far away it looks very three-dimensional, but the closer you walk towards it, the more the illusion becomes obvious: these details in the arch are reliefs but done in a kind of trompe d’œil style (although I don’t know if this is a proper name also for stone work). I had to touch the walls to feel that it is not three-dimensional. So much for a perfect illusion even from up close.
    The portal is beautifully decorated and shows scenes of the life of San Marco.

    Today this magnificent building is part of the civil hospital (Ospedale Civile). A medicine library is located in the upper floor and I read that there is still the scuole’s Sala del Albergo with a golden coffer vault. The interior seems to be open to the public, according to the Scuola di San Marco website. But I had to leave this for my next time.

    Best time for photos is in the afternoon when the sun shines on the southern facade.

    Vaporetto stop: Ospedale Civile, lines 4.1./4.2. and 5.1./5.2.:
    Venice vaporetto map
    Venice vaporetto schedule

    Location of (1) Campo San Zanipolo, (2) Scuola di San Marco, (3) Chiesa Santi Giovanni e Paolo on Bing Maps.

    © Ingrid D., July 2007 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.). Update June 2015: wording.

    This is not three-dimensional :-) One of the relief style lions The arch in total view Beautifully elaborated portal pillar And a view of the southern fa��ade
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    Campo San Zanipolo, one of my favourite campi

    by Trekki Updated Jun 22, 2015

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    Of all the campi in Venice I saw and sat for a while Campo San Zanipolo was my favourite. Ok, this was easy because I stayed around the corner in an apartment for the major part of my 12 days in 2007. I still don’t know why I liked it so much – maybe it was partly because of the hospital and the busy coming and going of people, maybe the cafes, restaurants and bácari. But maybe also because one of the best cafes in Venice is located here, Rosa Salva. They make really good cakes and pastries and the coffee smells and tastes divine. And then of course Chiesa Santi Giovanni e Paolowith mass service. Consequently, on weekends the campo is full with real Veneziano life – just perfect.

    In the middle of the campo sits very prominent the equestrian statue of Bartolomeo Colleoni (photos 2 and 3). This sculpture is famous in several aspects: it is one of the first bronze statues of that size built at that time (15th century) and even John Ruskin believed that there is no more glorious work of sculpture in this world. And then you might ask how does such a large and heavy statue can get into a town dominated by canals? There is an interesting and funny story behind this. Colleoni was one of Venezia’s most famous condottiere, leaders of armed forces, on terra firma back in mid 15th century. In his testament he promised to donate a large sum to Venezia, if he would get immortality through a monument in front of San Marco. But the Venetians did have problems with this, especially since he was not a native but from Bergamo. But then they thought smart and read the testament again very carefully. It did not specifically say “in front of the basilica San Marco” but just “in front of San Marco”. So his statue was placed indeed in front of San Marco, but of the Scuola di San Marco. So the testament was fulfilled and the city could claim the money.

    Vaporetto stop: Ospedale Civile, line 4.1./4.2. and 5.1./5.2.:
    Venice vaporetto map
    Venice vaporetto schedule

    Location of (1) Campo San Zanipolo, (2) Scuola di San Marco, (3) Chiesa Santi Giovanni e Paolo on Bing Maps.

    © Ingrid D., July 2007 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.). Update June 2015: wording.

    Very nice water well on Campo Zanipolo Bartolomeo Colleoni on his horse Bartolomeo Colleoni on his horse
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    Join me on a tour through “my” Castello

    by Trekki Updated Jun 22, 2015

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    Writing about Venice will always be a difficult task because almost everything has been said. I have decided that I will arrange my reviews according to the walks I did during my 12 days in town in May 2007. Hence the result is a kind of walking sequence through the individual districts or sestiere.
    This is my walking sequence through Castello, the eastern district of Venice. Castello walks part 1, 2 and 3 (see screenshots of Bing Maps with the respective localtions).

    Castello is one of my two favourite sestiere. Many locals live here, it has a very vivid and bustling atmosphere. The shops, bars and restaurants are frequented mostly by locals, and this is why many almost authentic restaurants with reasonable prices and often also homemade food can be found here.

    My Calstello walks started nearby where I stayed in an apartment, at Campo San Zanipolo, next to the splendid exterior of Scuola di San Marco. The famous Chiesa Santi Giovanni e Paolo is there with a beautiful interior and tombs of many of the city’s doges. From there I walked further east to San Francesco della Vigna and also found Brunetti’s questura from the book around the corner.

    I continued walking south, past the western walls of Arsenale to Arsenale, one of the reasons why Venice was so powerful in the past. The Arsenale’s entrance portal is splendid but the guards don’t allow visitors inside, so the only way to see at least something of the interior is to peek inside from the bridge. From there I just followed the flow and visited Museo Storico Navale which was one of my favourite museums in Venice. And through the backstreets of Castello, past an interesting the fish scale of the past trading days I arrived at the bridge to Isola San Pietro. I spent a relaxed afternoon on Isola San Pietro, visited the Chiesa di San Pietro and afterwards walked back through Via Garibaldi, found a lovely statue of Garibaldi statue with sea turtles, spent another relaxed time in Garibaldi Park before I walked back via the rive to Piazza San Marco.

    Location of (1) Campo San Zanipolo, (2) Scuola di San Marco, (3) Chiesa Santi Giovanni e Paolo, (4) Chiesa San Francesco della Vigna on Bing Maps.
    Location of (1) Arsenale’s western walls, (2) Arsenale, (3) Arsenale’s entrance portal. (4) the bridge in front of the large area of Arsenale, (5) Museo Storico Navale, (6) Backstreet Castello and the fish scale on Bing Maps.
    Location of (1) bridge to Isola San Pietro, (2) Chiesa San Pietro, (3) Isola San Pietro, (4) Via Garibaldi, (5) Garibaldi statue, (6) Garibaldi Park, (7) Rive on Bing Maps.

    © Ingrid D., July 2007 (So please do not copy my text without my permission.). Update June 2015: completely revised wording.

    My Castello walks, part 1 My Castello walks, part 2 My Castello walks, part 3
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    Riva degli Schiavoni

    by zadunajska8 Written Feb 12, 2012

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    This most famous of Venetian promenades which forms the southern edge of the Castello sestiere literally teems with people (mainly us tourists) and is a spectacular introduction to the city if you arrive by water.

    This quayside was named after the traders from Dalmatia in modern day Croatia (Schiavonia) who used to come ashore here. It seems only right that the multicultural buzz of the place has been maintained up to this day as tourists rush between elegant palazzi, hotels, restaurants, vaporetto stops and souvenir stalls. The promenade is also home to the statue of Vittorio Emanuele II, who was the first king of a united Italy. The statue was sculpted in 1887 by Ettore Ferrari.

    Google Map

    Riva degli Schiavoni Riva degli Schiavoni Vittorio Emanuele II, Riva degli Schiavoni Vittorio Emanuele II, Riva degli Schiavoni Vittorio Emanuele II, Riva degli Schiavoni
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    Scuola Grande di San Marco

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 14, 2011

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    Scuola Grande di San Marco was built in 1260 by Confraternity of San Marco to act as its seat. The building, however, was destroyed by a big fire in 1485 and rebuilt in the very beginnings of the 16th century under the design of Pietro Lombardo. Its facade is a masterwork with nicely decorated niches and pilasters and adorned with white marble statues completed by Mauro Codussi. Three of the greatest Italian explorers of the 15th century; Barbaro, da Mosto e Contarini were members of this Scuola.
    In the beginning of the 19th century, after fall of Napoleon, Habsburgs took the controll over the Venetian Republic and the Scuola became a military hospital. Nowadays it is a civil hospital of Venice.

    Scuola Grande di San Marco

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    Calle delle Rasse and Hotel Danieli

    by suvanki Updated Oct 7, 2010

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    CASTELLO
    VAPORETTO - SAN ZACCARIA

    Retracing your steps along the Riva degli Schiavoni, look for the Hotel Danieli. This is the largest and possibly one of the most famous hotels in Venice, and one of the top hotels in the world.

    Originally built as a Palace for the ducal Dandolo family in the 14th century, it became a hotel in 1822, named after its owner Joseph Da Niel. Newer wings were added in the 1940's Apparently its opulent interior is crammed with marble, stained glass, crystal chandeliers, silk covered walls, gilt mirrors and oriental carpets. It also has the uninterrupted view over the lagoon - but this comes with the accompanying noise from the pavement below!

    Between the 2 buildings of the hotel is a narrow street, Calle delle Rasse. Walking along here, you'll see many fish restaurants, bars and shops. When I visited at Christmas, small twinkling white lights decorated the street.

    This street was originally a hive of industry- Rasse (Rascia or Rassa) was a black strong canvas- like material, (or a woolen cloth) that was used to cover the gondolas, to protect their ornate furnishings and fabrics. It originated in Servia (Rascia)
    So manufacturing, selling and sewing of this material took place all along the street, and led to its name.

    Doge Vitale Michiel 1 was murdered by Marco Cassuolo at the entrance to this Calle on September 13th 1102, while he was on his way to pay his traditional annual visit to the nearby church of San Zaccaria.
    Cassuolo, was caught, after attempting to hide in one of the nearby houses at the Calles entrance, and hung.
    These houses were then destroyed. They were rebuilt, but not permitted to be constructed in stone. They were then destroyed to enable the extension of the Hotel Danieli.

    Apparently, Doge Vitale Michiel 11 was also murdered near this Calle, again on his way to San Zaccaria on 27th March 1172 - an Easter visit!! Hmmmm....

    Don't worry, the worst that is likely to happen today is that you'll be accosted by street entertainers along this route!!!

    Calle delle Rasse street sign
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